Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news 22 November 2020

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Come with us as we report through 2020

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TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

These news reports are updated on an ongoing basis. Check back regularly for the latest news as it develops – where necessary refresh your page at www.africaports.co.za

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Front Page: BAHRI TABUK

EARLIER NEWS CAN BE FOUND AT NEWS CATEGORIES…….

The Sunday masthead is of the port of Durban Container Terminal 

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FRONT PAGE: BAHRI TABUK

Bahri Tabuk, pictuire by Trevor Jones appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Bahri Tabuk, pictuire by Keith Betts appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Bahri Tabuk: Pictures by Trevor Jones (upper) and Keith Betts (lower)
We have a Ro-Ro vessel with a difference for our Front Page this week. She is the Saudi-owned BAHRI TABUK (IMO 9626522) seen arriving on an overcast rainy day that has been keeping Durban damp and sodden for much of the spring. Although Saudi-owned the 50,714-gt ship is managed by Mideast Ship Management, a UAE company based in Dubai. Built in 2014, the attractive Ro-Ro vessel is one of five in the fleet, Bahri Abha, Bahri Yanbu, Bahri Jazan, Bahri Hofuf being the siblings. Several of these ships, Yanbu and Tabuk among them, have been used to carry European-manufactured munitions to Saudi Arabia for use in the conflict in Yemen. These two pictures are by Trevor Jones (upper) and Keith Betts (lower)

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‘ONE’ MORE CONTAINER SERVICE BETWEEN NORTHERN EUROPE AND WEST AFRICA

ONE's EWX service map Europe to West Africa, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Ocean Network Express (ONE) intends launching a new weekly Europe – West Africa Service (EWX) aimed at delivering a more efficient and comprehensive service network.

According to ONE the first voyage will commence in February 2021.

From February the port rotation* will be as follows:

Hamburg – Rotterdam – Antwerp – Le Havre – Algeciras – Tangier – Dakar – Tema – Abidjan –
Hamburg
* the port rotation is subject to change.

EWX, as a dedicated service between Europe and West Africa, will provide competitive transit times and direct services.

By calling at Algeciras and Tangier ports, ONE will also provide transhipment connections linking West Africa from areas such as the Mediterranean, North America and Asia.

No details as to ship type or size range have so far been made available.

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IN CONVERSATION: Catalogue of failures behind growing humanitarian crisis in northern Mozambique

Soldiers from the Mozambican army patrol the streets in Mocimboa da Praia following an attack by suspected Islamists in October 2018. Adrien Barbier/AFP via Getty Images

Cristiano d’Orsi, University of Johannesburg

Cabo Delgado, the northernmost province of Mozambique, has been under attack for three years. The violence was triggered in 2017 when armed men attacked a police station, killing one police officer and critically injuring another. Locals identified the assailants as “al-shabaab”, alluding to an Islamic connection.

This year, the violence has escalated. In August, militants linked to the Islamic State seized the province’s strategic port town. The militants are reported to have formal ties to Islamic State. They are also tapping into local grievances.

The attacks in Cabo Delgado have led to loss of life and severely damaged infrastructure, already badly affected by Cyclone Kenneth in 2019. According to the government, nearly 35,000 houses have either been partially or totally destroyed. People from these communities are now seeking refuge in other Mozambican provinces.

The attacks have also led to disruptions in assistance to those who most need it. These include the elderly, women and children. And last month, the Mozambican Home Affairs Minister, Amade Miquidade, defined the attacks as “crimes against humanity”.

The origins of Cabo Delgado’s violent extremism are complex. Mozambique is a fragile state from many points of view. Cabo Delgado in particular has been called an “ungoverned territory”.

It is the poorest province in Mozambique, with high unemployment and inequitable distribution of wealth. The area is rich in oil deposits, liquefied natural gas fields and gemstones. But people who live there have not benefited.

Since 2017, insurgents have carried out more than 600 attacks in its central and northern districts, causing more than 2,000 deaths. Over 60% were civilians.

The crisis has resulted in growing numbers of internally displaced persons – more than 300,000 by the end of September. That is about 13% of the province’s population. These rising numbers could soon result in a displacement crisis.

Management of the crisis is being hampered on a number of fronts.

The Mozambique government has been unable to openly discuss the crisis and help those in need of support. It is also against updated displacement numbers being published, fearing it may damage the reputation of a province on which the country’s economic future is effectively mortgaged.

A lack of information from the government has helped to create confusion. In addition, it is sticking to a military approach that has been marred by human rights abuses. One example has been the arrest of journalists working in the region.

Certainly one of the biggest mistakes the government made was allowing insurgents to occupy Mocímboa da Praia for a long period of time. New recruits are joining freely.

For their part, humanitarian agencies have been focused largely on cyclone relief efforts. And institutions on the continent have not risen to the occasion. The regional Southern African Development Community has failed to step up to the plate and the African Union has not been able to get its act together. Both have obligations, on paper at least, to assist.

Although the regional body recognised the insurrection in Mozambique as a threat to the entire region in May this year, there has been no regional or international intervention.




Read more:
Why South Africa has a keen interest in extremist violence in northern Mozambique


Massive displacement

Up until the end of 2019, Mozambique’s government had directed its people to remain in their villages despite the repeated attacks. People fleeing for safety were instructed to return to their lands, with the promise that military units would be dispatched to protect them. This official stance delayed the mobilisation of international aid and the opening of accommodation centres for internally displaced persons.

By September 2020, about 1,000 refugees had crossed into neighbouring Tanzania. This has deepened concerns in the international community about the impact of the conflict on the region.

With Cabo Delgado currently recording the second-highest number of COVID-19 cases in Mozambique, population displacements have the potential to accelerate the spread of the virus across borders.

Also in September, Mozambique asked the European Union for help in training its armed forces to battle the insurgency. It also requested medical equipment and humanitarian assistance to help victims of the conflict.

In October, 24 boats carrying 2,700 refugees docked near Pemba on the southern shores of the Cabo Delgado province. They were fleeing violence and insecurity.

The massive displacement of people internally, together with the large numbers of refugees, have now become a major point of concern for the government. Internally displaced Mozambicans are now at risk of abuse. This is particularly true for women and children.

Generally, access to basic services like food and shelter is severely limited. Humanitarian workers are struggling to provide an adequate response to the growing needs within COVID-19 restrictions.

Assistance and obligations

Mozambique is a state party to 15 of the 19 international conventions and protocols against terrorism, and the 1999 African Union Convention on the Prevention and Combating of Terrorism, including the AU’s 2004 terrorism protocol. These allow nation states to seek assistance from the international community in times of crisis occasioned by terror.

The African Union first acknowledged the crisis in February 2020. It announced its willingness to support Mozambique, but could not intervene ahead of the Southern African Development Community, due to the principle of subsidiarity that governs relations between the AU and regional economic communities.

Various instruments of the Southern African Development Community, of which Mozambique is a founding member, oblige the regional body to come to Mozambique’s aid as it continues to battle terrorists and insurgents.

But a summit of the regional body held in Harare in May 2020 failed to agree on what role it could play.

Humanitarian response

These are hard times for Mozambique. The Southern African Development Community and the African Union should develop and implement a coordinated response to the crisis urgently.

For its part, the Mozambican government should take the lead in the humanitarian response to support internally displaced citizens. It needs to dispatch multi-sector teams of professionals to assist the local authorities in registering the displaced, and providing psychosocial support.

As the government demarcates plots of land to resettle the displaced, it should set up more centres to accommodate those who are living with host families. Reports of tensions between host families and displaced persons are becoming more common.

Access to adequate and appropriate shelter and non-food items is critical to ensure that the most vulnerable are not at risk.

Mozambique is a signatory to the AU Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa. As such, the government must ensure that the Mozambican security forces desist from violating the rights of people who have been displaced. In addition, it must ensure that refugees arriving in Pemba are treated with dignity.

On top of that, the United Nations must continue to support the government’s humanitarian response to ensure that its internally displaced populations are protected.

This article was updated to remove an error that made an incorrect reference to Pemba.The Conversation

Cristiano d’Orsi, Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at the South African Research Chair in International Law (SARCIL), University of Johannesburg

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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ESPO PUBLISHES 2020 ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR EUROPEAN PORT SECTOR

On 10 November the European Sea Ports Organisation (ESPO) presented its fifth annual Environmental Report during a dedicated Webinar.

The report is available HERE

espo eNVIRONMENTAL rEPORTS 2020, FEATURED IN aFRICA ports & ships MARITIME NEWS

The ESPO Environmental Report 2020 includes more than 60 different environmental performance benchmarks, such as the Top 10 Environmental Priorities of the European ports, and figures on the green services to shipping (shore-side electricity, LNG and environmentally differentiated port dues).

These ten priorities are indicated CLICK HERE

Air quality continues to be the top environmental priority for ports as it has become a key determinant of sustainable port activity and ports’ license to operate.  Climate change has become the second top priority of ports in 2020, having entered the Top 10 environmental priorities for the first time in 2017. In 2020, seven out of ten European ports take climate change into consideration when they develop new infrastructure projects.

The threat posed by climate change is demonstrated by…

Paul Ridgway London Correspondent for Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

 

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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TRANSNET ISSUES WARNING OF JOB AND TENDER SCAM

 

 

Transnet banner featuring in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Transnet SOC Ltd has issued a statement saying that it wishes to warn the public not to fall prey to job and tender scams.

According to Transnet (together with its operating divisions – Engineering, Freight Rail, National Ports Authority, Pipelines, Port Terminals and Property), it has experienced an increase in the number…

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TOTAL & CMA CGM COMPLETE WORLD’S LARGEST LNG BUNKERING OPERATION

CMA CGM Jacques Saade a the port of Rotterdam taking LNG bunkers from the Gas Agility. Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
CMA CGM Jacques Saade a the port of Rotterdam taking over 17,000 m3 of LNG bunkers from the Gas Agility

The CMA CGM Jacques Saadé, the world’s largest containership powered by Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) recently completed her first LNG bunkering with Total’s LNG bunker vessel, the Gas Agility, on 13 November 2020 at the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands. The 23,000 TEU containership received around 17,300 m3 of LNG, making it the largest LNG bunkering operation to ever take place.

Safe and efficient bunkering operation was performed by the Gas Agility at the Rotterdam World Gateway terminal by means of a ship-to-ship transfer, while the CMA CGM Jacques Saadé carried out cargo operations simultaneously. The supply of LNG was provided by Total Marine Fuels Global Solutions, Total’s dedicated business unit in charge of worldwide bunkering activities. Refueling took approximately 24 hours to complete.

Read the rest of this report in the TRADE NEWS section available by CLICKING HERE

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WHARF TALK: Coastal Ship Movements

Mystery ship off he KZN coast opposite Amanzimtoti this week - see story below. Picture: Veselfinder, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Mystery ship off the KZN coast opposite Amanzimtoti this week – see story below.    Picture: Veselfinder

No News is not necessarily good news!

There’s little in the way of news coming out from some of the ports lately, including from Cape Town ever since they more or less overcame the congestion problems that arose with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

That was when some of the port staff went down with the virus, while others stayed away from work for fear of catching the dreaded coronavirus. Either way it caused chaos with port operations and required an injection of volunteers from another port to help restore equilibrium to terminal operations.

We sometimes battle to obtain news from the windy city – Port Elizabeth, home to two ports in close proximity and a third just up the coast at East London. Having said that, we carried a report yesterday about Oiltanking Grindrod Calulo (OTGC) announcing their withdrawal from the planned liquid bulk terminal at Ngqura. Elsewhere today we report on what effect this will have on the existing liquid bulk tank farm at Port Elizabeth. It’s all related.

Shipping news is not all bad news, doom and gloom although there’s been enough of that in 2020 so far. What about the interesting ships we observe along the coast. What cruise enthusiast can complain of the procession of cruise ships that in any other circumstance would never have visited our shores, yet not only did they come this way but most stopped over to bunker, drop off local crew and take fresh supplies (including booze and ciggies otherwise then denied to shorebound South Africans).

This happened not just once, but in some instances was repeated when the ships returned some months later.

Meanwhile, the good people of Ballito, just to the north of Durban, have a daily view from their patios, balconies and verandahs of the MSC Orchestra drifting at anchor a short distance off the coast, sitting it out with a skeleton crew while waiting patiently (?) for cruising to resume.

Every now and then the 90,000-ton ship, so well-known to local cruisers, enters port at Durban for water or whatever, before returning to her lonely vigil.  Sometimes she takes a short cruise along the coast ‘to nowhere’ and always returning to her anchorage.

Recently we had a call from a reader living at Amanzimtoti on the KZN South Coast, just south of Durban.

There was a “rust bucket” of a ship hanging around close inshore off ‘Toti, he reported. Had been there for several days and nights, was it a foreign fishing vessel stealing all our lovely fish or was it a ship in distress? Surely someone must know of it, he said.

That’s when AIS comes to the rescue and makes us appear so smart and knowledgeable. A quick scrutiny revealed the vessel in question to be the Italian cable-layer TELIRI (IMO 9105889), owned and managed by Elettra TC of Rome and presumably undertaking some repairs to an existing cable along the KZN coast. Or maybe they just enjoyed the view of the little town named in Zulu as the ‘river of sweet waters’.

Shortly after this Teleri entered port to bunker after which she sailed for the the Cape with Takoradi showing as her destination.

It was about this time that another cable-layer, the better known (locally) LEON THEVENIN broke free of the shackles holding her firmly to the quayside at the Cape Town V&A Waterfront and sailed with her destination showing as “off Durban”.

What’s potting with the undersea cables off Durban we do not know. There are cables that come ashore along the KZN coast but that’s at Mtunzini, further north on the Zululand coast. Maybe a reader can tell us?

By the way, the fishing off ‘Toti is reputed to be rather good!

Resident cable layer Leon Thevenin, stationed in South Africa to cable laying and maintenance repairs. Picture: Terry Hutson, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Resident cable layer Leon Thevenin, stationed in South Africa to cable laying and maintenance repairs. Picture: Terry Hutson

Turning our attention back to the Cape once more, reader and correspondent John Hawkins tells us that last Saturday (14 November) the bulk cargo vessel ASI M (IMO 9244843) sailed from Cape Town at 05h50 bound for the port of Recalada in Argentina, with an ETA showing of 29 November 2020.

On Tuesday 17 November the ship returned to anchorage in the bay off Milnerton, at 10h37. Whatever the reason was she came back under her own steam with no salvage tug in attendance to see her to the anchorage position. A mystery, he says!

Adding to this little story the bulker has since sailed once more for South America, with a new ETA allowing for the unplanned delay.

Another snippet of shipping news from him concerns the heavylift semi-submersible vessel HUA XING LONG (IMO 9808182) which arrived off Cape Town on 14 November from Chaguaramas anchorage and sailed again two days later, bound for Ningbo in China. Chaguaramas incidentally is in Trinidad, a short distance from Port of Spain. These heavylift ships are always of interest because of their size and often, the unusual cargoes they carry on deck.

News from the port of Richards Bay is that Transnet is upgrading the fencing and as a result construction work may at times contribute to traffic congestion within the port precinct, due to delivery of materials on heavy lorries.

The construction duration will be from 19 November 2020 to 2 August 2021 – that’s because Richards Bay is a big port and has a long fence!

If any reader has some news or snippets to share please pass them on, addressed to terry@africaports.co.za

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WHARF TALK: Port Elizabeth Tank Farm closure not affected by OTGC withdrawal

Port Elizabeth tank farm and surrounds. Picture: TNPA, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Port Elizabeth tank farm and surrounds. Picture: TNPA

Plans to close-down the existing tank farm at the Port Elizabeth harbour and transfer the operation to nearby Port of Ngqura are not affected by the news this week that Oiltanking Grindrod Calulo (Pty) Ltd (OTGC) had abandoned further development of its Liquid Bulk Terminal project in the Port of Ngqura – see that report HERE.

On Monday OTGC said it has not been able to achieve a commercially viable business case for the proposed terminal. The evolving market and commercial requirements for a reduced terminal capacity and land could not be accommodated in the parameters of the TNPA procurement process, it said.

According to Transnet National Ports Authority the decommissioning of the Port Elizabeth tank farm will still go ahead….

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IN CONVERSATION: Ships moved more than 11 billion tonnes of our stuff around the globe last year, and it’s killing the climate. This week is a chance to change

Shutterstock

Christiaan De Beukelaer, University of Melbourne

The shipping of goods around the world keeps economies going. But it comes at an enormous environmental cost – producing more CO₂ than the aviation industry. This problem should be getting urgent international attention and action, but it’s not.

This week, all 174 member states of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) will discuss a plan to meet an emissions reduction target. But the target falls far short of what’s needed, and the plan to get there is also weak.

As other industries clean up their act, shipping’s share of the global emissions total will only increase. New fuels and ship design, and even technology such as mechanical sails, may go some way to decarbonising the industry – but it won’t be enough.

It’s high time the international shipping industry radically curbed its emissions. The industry must set a net-zero target for 2050 and a realistic plan to meet it.

Cargo ships waiting offshore with plane wing in foreground

The shipping industry accounts for more carbon emissions than aviation.
Shutterstock

Shipping: by the numbers

Globally, more than 50,000 merchant ships ship about 11 billion tonnes of goods a year. In 2019 they covered nearly 60 trillion tonne-miles, which refers to transporting one tonne of goods over a nautical mile.

Per tonne-mile, carbon dioxide emissions from shipping are among the lowest of all freight transport options. But in 2018, shipping still emitted 1,060 million tonnes of CO₂ – 2.89% of global emissions. By comparison, the aviation industry contributed 918 million tonnes of CO₂, or 2.4% of the total.

And as international trade increases and other sectors decarbonise, global shipping is expected to contribute around 17% of human-caused emissions by 2050.

An emissions pariah

The IMO, which regulates the global shipping industry, did not set meaningful emissions reduction targets until April 2018. This is despite being requested to reduce emissions as far back as 1997 under the Kyoto Protocol.

The IMO has pledged to halve shipping emissions between 2008 and 2050 while aiming for full decarbonisation. By 2030, the carbon intensity (or emissions per tonne-mile) of individual ships should fall by 40%, compared with 2008 levels.

The IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee, is devising binding rules for the industry to achieve these emissions goals. Draft measures being considered this week focus solely on reducing the carbon intensity of individual ships. The plan has been slammed by critics because emissions reductions are not in line with Paris Agreement commitments of limiting global warming to 1.5℃ or 2℃ by 2100.




Read more:
The shipping sector is finally on board in the fight against climate change


There are two main issues with the 40% emissions intensity target.

First, it’s not ambitious enough. Research suggests limiting warming to 1.5℃ requires the shipping industry to reach net-zero emissions. Merely reducing the carbon intensity of ships will barely make a dent in current emissions. Worse, even the best-case scenario will likely lead to a 14% emissions increase compared to 2008.

Second, the IMO has yet to say how it will meet its targets. The plan up for discussion this week is weak: not least because it lacks enforcement mechanisms.

Exterior of IMO building
The IMO dragged its feet on setting an emissions target for the industry.
Shutterstock

So how do we fix the problem?

Earlier this year, I sailed on the Avontuur. This 100-year-old two-masted schooner under German flag sailed from Germany to the Caribbean and Mexico to load 65 tonnes of coffee and cacao, then ship it under sail to Hamburg.

The round-trip took more than six months and 15 crew members. Roughly 169 million ships like the Avontuur would be needed to transport the 11 billion tonnes of goods moved by sea each year. It would require 2.5 billion crew, compared with 1.5 million today. Clearly, that is not realistic.

So how, then, do we solve the international shipping problem? Clean transport advocates say we must reduce demand for cargo transport by using what’s locally available, and generally consuming less and moving to a post-growth economy.




Read more:
Plain sailing: how traditional methods could deliver zero-emission shipping


Some scientists concur, arguing either carbon intensity or shipping demand must come down – and probably both.

Ships can significantly reduce their emissions simply by slowing down. Carbon emissions increase exponentially when ships travel above cruising speed. But the industry seems unwilling to pick this low-hanging fruit, perhaps because it would compromise just-in-time supply chains.

Ships commonly burn huge amounts of heavy fuel oil. Emerging fuels, such as hydrogen and ammonia, have the potential to cut emissions from ships. But producing these fuels may create substantial emissions, and adopting new fuels would require building new ships or retrofitting existing ones.

Existing vessels can also be retrofitted with more efficient propulsion mechanisms. They could also be fitted with wind-assist technologies such as sails, rotors, kites, and suction wings. Research suggests these technologies could reduce a ship’s emissions by 10–60%.

And new designs for sail-powered cargo vessels are emerging. But these ships are yet to be built and it may be a long time before they are widely used.

An artist impression of the Neoline sail-powered cargo ship.
Sail-powered cargo vessels can help slash global emissions.
Neoline

Looking ahead

Technological solutions on their own will not bring the necessary emissions reductions. New technologies must be embraced immediately, and ambitious regulation is necessary. Industry and consumer demand for shipped goods must fall as well.

Earth’s remaining carbon budget is fast shrinking and all industry sectors must do their fair share. At this point in the climate crisis, further delays and weak targets are inexcusable.The Conversation

Christiaan De Beukelaer, Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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SUPPORTING SAFE RESUMPTION OF CRUISE SHIP OPERATIONS

Picture per www.imo.org / IMO / SDGS ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Picture per www.imo.org / IMO / SDGS ©

IMO and UNWTO encourage the cruise industry and Governments to continue their efforts to enable cruise ship operations to resume safely

In a joint statement issued on 5 November, the IMO and the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) highlighted the importance of the cruise sector for the world economy.

According to industry data, the cruise sector supports 1.2 million jobs and contributes US$150 billion to the global economy every year. Tourism is vitally important for Small Islands States, where it sustains millions of livelihoods and brings substantial socio-economic benefits.

The two UN agencies also recognise the efforts made by the industry, countries and international organisations to protect the safety, health and well-being of passengers and crew, as well as the health of the population of destination port States of cruise ships. Since cruise operations were suspended worldwide due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the industry has been reviewing and enhancing its protocols to identify ways to go further in protecting the health of passengers, crew and the general public.

Introduced on 5 November the joint statement invited Governments to use the Guidance on the gradual and safe resumption of operations of cruise ships in the European Union in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic (shared by IMO in Circular Letter No 4204/Add.26 SEE HERE ) to facilitate the recovery of the sector under safe conditions, as well as three framework documents (operator framework, passenger framework and seafarer framework) developed by the UK’s Chamber of Shipping together with Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA).

IMO and UNWTO emphasise that the resumption of cruise ship operations will also benefit the wider maritime community, since passenger ships participate in the automated mutual-assistance vessel rescue (AMVER see www.amver.com ) and are often requested by Rescue Coordination Centres to offer assistance to ships in distress at sea.

IMO and UNWTO reiterate their call to Governments to designate all seafarers and marine personnel as key workers and remove any barriers to crew changes. SEE HERE

Paul Ridgway London Correspondent for Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

 

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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WHARF TALK: Durban Port Bulletin News

Moshe Motlohi, Transnet National Ports Authority General Manager reports:

Moshe Motlohi, Durban port manager featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

We started off this week with disturbing news as the Port where we learnt of a colleague’s sudden passing. While we know that the COVID-19 pandemic has posed challenges in us showing compassion in as far as funerals are concerned, we do have you in our thoughts. To the family and colleagues of Lindani Zulu, I wish to extend my condolences and I do hope that you find comfort in knowing that you are in our prayers.

The Maydon Wharf Decongestion stream has hit the road running. This stream has brought in players from Cato Ridge to discuss interventions around the proposed mega truck staging facility. We were also joined by this stakeholder in our biweekly Decongestion Task Team meeting this week.

I am very much optimistic about the progress to be made in this stream and I hope that soon we will see a notable difference in the challenges which have been characterizing Maydon Wharf.

This week was jam packed with engagements in the port. We started off the week with hosting the new Transnet Group Executives in an induction programme of all Transnet sites in the Durban area. I also had the privilege and opportunity to be part of the panel discussion at the District Development Model Meeting held at the ICC where I provided feedback on progress made in the Decongestion Task Team initiatives.

The work done was positively received and we were encouraged to continue collaborating with stakeholders in an effort to “Re-imagine Durban”. We also hosted our Chief Executive, Mr Pepi Silinga in the port for two days where we walked all of the Port precincts to familiarise him with our port operations and infrastructure projects on the horizon.

Lastly, watch this space for a CNN special where we were featured in to create awareness on our port and also provide update on the Decongestion Task Team Initiatives.

For the first time this week, the Root Cause Analysis stream of our task team reported on progress made in this front. The stream looked at system capability in the Durban Container Terminals where data was analysed and notable findings were reported.

Looking at the period from February to date, we noted that the performance has improved in these terminals compared to the preceding period. We are currently having 40% of the trucks being handled with the acceptable envelope of performance compared to our target. We have not looked at the factor of trucks doing multiple transactions. With that it is possible that the percentage is likely to be higher than reported.

We are hoping and working towards increasing this gradually to higher percentages.

The next step here is to find key interventions to help us get to our ideal standard. We are also wanting to share these achievements with the colleagues on the ground to so that they can be encourage to push harder to achieve the ultimate goal.

Our focus for the upcoming week, we continue to monitor the Maydon Wharf precinct and roping in key stakeholders around interventions in this area. With alert level 1 being amended and some of the restriction being slightly relaxed, COVID-19 remains a threat to our lives as well as our businesses, therefore be safe and remember to keep a safe social distance, always wear your masks, wash your hands regularly with soap and water or sanitize with an alcohol based sanitizer.

source: TNPA Port of Durban. Note that this reflects the week 9-15 November 2020

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WHARF TALK: Durban Volume and Vessel Call Performance

Salisbury Island and the vast Island View Liquid Bulk terminal beyond, handling a variety of chemical and petroleum products in addition to grains and agricultural products. Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Salisbury Island and the vast Island View Liquid Bulk terminal beyond, handling a variety of chemical and petroleum products in addition to grains and agricultural products

For this reporting week Container Volumes were above budget.

Imports cargo was the major contributor for the positive variance, this is primarily due to high cargo output from China for year-end goods.

Transshipments did well at 8% above budget. 12 vessels were committed and 19 vessels were handled, calling with larger than budgeted parcel. Exports however remain below budget by 2%.

Automotive volumes were below budget this reporting week. This sector has dropped in volumes once again while the port was still experiencing a spike in the previous reporting week. Only a total of 955 import units where handled which proved that there was an erratic behavior in terms of consumer trends.

Exports performed moderately well at 4064 units down from 5970 units handled in the previous reporting week.

Durban port dry bulk volumes were below budget. This sector is under budget in this reporting week due to lower fertilizer imports handled for the period. We also see moderate volumes of Chrome ore exported at 55,000 tons with manganese also coming in at just over 40,000 tons.

Break Bulk volumes saw a good week this period and performed above the targeted budget. This was due to high volumes of cement imports handled at the port totaling to 71,853 tons. The port also saw an influx of rice landed at 26,573 tons and with steel also performing well at just over 12,700 tons.

With liquid bulk volumes declining during this reporting week, only chemicals volumes performed. This was mainly due to a record breaking number of eight vessels handled carrying large parcel sizes of imports and exports volumes destined for the mining, manufacturing and construction sectors.

SBM (Single Buoy Mooring) volumes were 42% below budget, due to only two vessels handled. Petroleum volumes came in at 32% below budget, this was as a result of high volumes handled the previous reporting week.

source: TNPA Port of Durban. Note that this reflects the week 9-15 November 2020

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WHARF TALK: SA Port Statistics for October 2020 are now available here

Port statistics for the month of October 2020, covering the eight commercial ports under the administration of Transnet National Ports Authority, are now available.

Details of the port throughputs, ships berthed and motor vehicle and container volumes handled can be seen in the Tables below.

Statistics involving motor vehicles are measured in vehicle units. These include imports and exports, earth-moving and other ro-ro or wheeled vehicles.

The effects of the long economic downturn continue to be reflected in the results if compared with previous years, (these statistics available on this site), although there have been suggestions of a gradual recovery in respect of cargo volumes handled.

Container handling remains adversely affected, representing as it does manufactured goods and household items of the wholesale and retail trades. As was the case with September, the month of October is usually one of the peak months for these commodities, but the peaks this year are considerably lower, and with a second wave of COVID-19 looking likely, both in South Africa and across much of the world, the prospects for the immediate future are not promising.

All things considered it is looking as though 2020 will not be a year to remember, for several good reasons. For a comparison with the same month in 2019 we provide a link below.

For comparison with the equivalent month of last year, October 2019 CLICK HERE

These statistic reports on Africa PORTS & SHIPS are arrived at using an adjustment on the overall tonnage compared to those kindly provided by TNPA and include containers recorded by weight; an adjustment necessary because TNPA measures containers by the number of TEUs and does not reflect the weight which unfortunately undervalues the ports.

To arrive at such a calculation,  Africa PORTS & SHIPS uses an average of 13.5 tonnes per TEU, which probably does involve some under-reporting.  Africa PORTS & SHIPS  will continue to emphasise this distinction, without which South African ports would be seriously under-reported internationally and locally.

Port Statistics continue below

Cape Town harbour scene, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Cape Town harbour scene

Figures for the respective ports during October 2020 are:

Cargo handled by tonnes during October 2020, including containers by weight

PORT October 2020 million tonnes
Richards Bay 8.054
Durban 6.378
Saldanha Bay 6.237
Cape Town 1.337
Port Elizabeth 1.299
Ngqura 0.878
Mossel Bay 0.044
East London -0.137
Total all ports 24.366 million tonnes

CONTAINERS (measured by TEUs) during October 2020
(TEUs include Deepsea, Coastal, Transship and empty containers all subject to being invoiced by NPA

PORT October 2020 TEUs
Durban 213,052
Cape Town 60,431
Port Elizabeth 4,446
Ngqura 44,440
East London 2,521
Richards Bay 821
Total all ports 325,711 TEU

MOTOR VEHICLES RO-RO TRAFFIC (measured by Units- CEUs) during October 2020

PORT October 2020 CEUs
Durban 27,104
Cape Town 2
Port Elizabeth 8,746
East London 8,917
Richards Bay 3
Total all ports 44,772 CEU

SHIP CALLS for October 2020

PORT October 2020 vessels gross tons
Durban 255 9,897,389
Cape Town 124 3,726,140
Richards Bay 148 5,625,766
Port Elizabeth 68 1,678,951
Saldanha Bay 49 3,282,660
Ngqura 47 2,417,376
East London 24 775,661
Mossel Bay 31 177,037
Total ship calls 746 27,130,980
— source TNPA, with adjustments regarding container weights by AP&s[/restrict]

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WHARF TALK: Update on the nurdle clean-up efforts along the Western Cape coastline

Plastic nurdles in the beachsand, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Plastic nurdles in the beachsand

The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) said in a statement on Tuesday (17 November) that authorities are working hard to address the nurdles recently washing up along certain regions of the south Western Cape coastline from Fish Hoek in False Bay to Goukamma Marine Protected Area and Plettenberg Bay.

The nurdles are also reported to be washing up along the Eastern Cape coastline, the exact locations are still to be confirmed. These may…

 

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RAMAPHOSA CALLS ON BRICS TO STRENGTHEN TRADE, INVESTMENT TIES

BRICS banner flying in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

South Africa’s President Cyril Ramaphosa has called on his Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRICS) counterparts to strengthen trade and investment ties. He said this was needed to fast-track economic recovery post the COVID-19 pandemic.

The President’s call comes as the BRICS virtual summit took place on Tuesday (17 November), coinciding with the start of the South Africa Investment Conference in Johannesburg.

“We call on our BRICS partners to ramp up investment in not just South Africa but across the continent, particularly in the manufacturing sector.

“Investors from the BRIC countries will realise considerable benefits by investing in Africa, particularly with the implementation of the African Continental Free Trade Area from January 2021,” he said.

The third SA Investment Conference is a platform to share with investors the progress South Africa has made in economic reforms and to showcase the country’s potential as an investment destination.

While African leaders acted swiftly to contain COVID-19, President Ramaphosa called on the international community and the BRICS partners to support a comprehensive stimulus package for African countries.

“This will enable African countries to contain the disease and rebuild our damaged economies,” Ramaphosa said.

The New Development Bank has a significant role to play

“To date, the bank has approved US$4 billion of COVID-related emergency assistance projects, including $1 billion to South Africa to support our health response and social relief measures,” he said.

Pres Cyril Ramaphosa, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
President Cyril Ramaphosa

The president welcomed the indications from the New Development Bank that it aims to provide up to $10 billion in crisis-related assistance and to support economic recovery efforts.

In light of the battle of the COVID-19 pandemic and the search for a vaccine, President Ramaphosa said this year’s experience has demonstrated the need to accelerate the establishment of the BRICS Vaccine Research and Development Centre in South Africa, as agreed in the 2018 Johannesburg Declaration.

“We support the initiative to establish an integrated early warning system for preventing mass infectious diseases, and believe this is a project that could be supported by the New Development Bank.

“Investing in science, technology and innovation will not only prepare us for future health emergencies, but it will also enable us to confront other global challenges,” he said.

At the summit, South Africa also reiterated its call for multilateralism.

“It is clear from this pandemic, that we must strengthen multilateralism as the preferred means to advance our mutual interests.

“We reiterate our call for reform of the UN Security Council to ensure that it is more representative and inclusive, in line with the principle of the sovereign equality of all states.”

With respect to development through industrialisation, President Ramaphosa said countries must ensure that trade rules take the interests of developing countries into account.

In this regard, the President said reform of the World Trade Organisation is key to rebalancing the global trading system and ensuring that its benefits are shared more equitably.

As resolved in the 2019 Brasilia Declaration, he urged for continued collaboration through the BRICS partnership to address the problem of under-invoicing, which has a profound impact on industrial development and employment goals.

“Our meeting today – in the midst of economic and social turmoil – is evidence that our partnership is strong and enduring.

“Working together, let us continue our onward march towards shared peace, security and prosperity, not only for our respective countries, but for all of humanity,” said the President.

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UNCTAD’s REVIEW OF MARITIME TRANSPORT 2020
Highlights and figures on Africa

UNCTAD Report, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

On 12 November from Geneva UNCTAD issued its Review of Maritime Transport 2020. The document may be downloaded HERE

Review of Maritime Transport 2020 provides an update on the latest trends in maritime trade, supply, markets, key performance indicators, and legal and regulatory developments. It also includes a special chapter with testimonials from maritime stakeholders and their experiences in coping with the COVID-19 pandemic.

There is no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the global interdependency of nations and set in motion new trends that will reshape the maritime transport landscape.

UNCTAD reports that the sector is at a pivotal moment facing not only immediate concerns resulting from the pandemic but also longer-term considerations, ranging from shifts in supply-chain design and globalisation patterns to changes in consumption and spending habits, a growing focus on risk assessment and resilience-building, as well as a heightened global sustainability and low-carbon agenda. The sector is also dealing with the knock-on effects of growing trade protectionism and inward-looking policies.

The pandemic has brought to the fore the importance of maritime transport as an essential sector for the continued delivery of critical supplies and global trade in time of crisis, during the recovery stage and when resuming normality.

Many organisations, including UNCTAD and other international bodies, issued recommendations and guidance emphasising the need to ensure business continuity in the sector, while protecting port workers and seafarers from the pandemic. They underscored the need for ships to meet international requirements, including sanitary restrictions, and for ports to remain open for shipping and intermodal transport operations.

Impact of COVID-19 in Africa

Here the UNCTAD media staff have done a good job outlining the Review’s findings with an African slant. This is most praiseworthy.

Negative impact

COVID-19 has negatively impacted Africa. In the second quarter of 2020, UNCTAD estimated the drop in Africa’s exports at -35% and the drop in imports at -25%. By July 2020, there were some improvements, but numbers still pointed to double-digit drops of -17% for imports and -21% exports.

Ship calls down

By late June 2020, the drop in the number of ship calls in Sub-Saharan Africa stood at -9.7% while the drop in container ship calls stood at -12.7%. The impact on bulk shipping was less pronounced. Port calls by dry bulk carriers declined by 7.7% while calls by wet bulk carriers was less affected, falling by 1.4 % only.

African ports

The pie-chart shows sub-regional participation in Africa’s maritime trade, 2019. UNCTAD ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The pie-chart shows sub-regional participation in Africa’s maritime trade, 2019. UNCTAD ©

African ports have shown mixed trends in terms of impact on connectivity. In three African ports (Lagos, Durban, TangerMed), for example, connectivity levels were found to have coped well with the pandemic compared with other ports in the region, despite blank sailings negatively impacting service frequency.

Cargo delays

Restrictions affecting inland transportation have created some challenges to cross-border crossings. For example, in some African countries, the time taken to pick up cargo after customs release increased in 2020 compared to the same period in 2019.

Trucks took longer times to return to their departure points due to the restrictions imposed to contain the pandemic. Such disruptions led also to delays in the return of empty containers to the ports (e.g. port Mombasa), which often led to retention charges set by shipping lines.

Like in other regions, digitalisation is recognised as key to navigating the COVID-19 crisis, hence capacity-building in this area is required. However, a “readiness gap” in the maritime sector’s automation and technology levels puts African countries at a disadvantage.

Challenges ahead

Maritime transport in Africa needs to address challenges facing innovation and technology, infrastructure quality, regulation and governance, human capital and skills, as well as business and investment.

Addressing sustainability concerns is an important agenda item at the global level and Africa’s maritime sector should improve its ability to align activities with sustainability goals and principles as well as build the resilience of its infrastructure, services and operations.

Achieving the 2050 greenhouse gases’ emissions targets set out by the IMO is critical, and countries, including in Africa, have an important role to play in enforcing IMO rules as a way of minimising climate change impacts on the sector.

Demand (merchandise trade, maritime cargo): key trends in seaborne trade and port cargo traffic
While about one-third of African countries are landlocked, maritime transport remains the main gateway to the global marketplace. Africa’s international trade relies heavily on shipping and ports.

Value and volume considered

Africa accounts for a small share of world merchandise trade by value: about 2.5% of exports and 3% of imports in 2020. In terms of volumes, however, and based on maritime trade data estimated by UNCTAD, Africa contributes relatively larger shares to globalised maritime trade. In 2019, African ports loaded close to 7% of world maritime trade (exported) and unloaded 4.6% of this trade (imported). These contributing shares, however, remain below those of developing Asian and American regions.

The marginal relative contribution of Africa to maritime trade is also observed when looking at its share of developing countries’ maritime trade. In 2019, Africa accounted for about 12% of the volumes loaded in developing countries and 7% of the unloaded ones. The dominant shares were held by developing Asia, followed by developing Americas (Latin America and the Caribbean).

Africa’s contribution to world trade

The contribution of Africa to maritime trade flows is marginal unlike Asia, which has benefited from its greater integration into global manufacturing and trading networks, promoting intraregional trade. Maritime trade in Africa continues to be shaped by the continent’s trade concentration and limited diversification. Accordingly, about half of the goods exported by sea in 2019 composed of tanker trade, while over two-thirds of imports consisted of dry cargoes (dry bulks and containerised goods).

UNCTAD’s top five African ports featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
UNCTAD’s top five African ports

Africa’s container ports accounted for a modest share of about 4% of global containerised trade volume, much of which comprised imports of manufactured goods.

Targeted trade and industrial policy measures and regional integration initiatives such as the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) have the potential to enhance Africa’s containerised trade flows.

Shipping fleet developments, connectivity and port performance

Participation in the supply of shipping services remains an ambition in Africa, as the continent’s ownership of the world fleet is limited, with only Nigeria to be featured among the top 35 owning nations, with a share of 0.31% in deadweight tonnage as of 1 January 2020.

Only Liberia makes the list of top flag states, ranking second globally after Panama in terms of deadweight capacity and third after Panama and Marshall Islands in terms of the value of the fleet. As of 1 January 2020, Liberia had increased the ship-carrying capacity registered under its flag by 13% and accounted for 13% of the total world deadweight.

At the corners; sub-regional load centres

African countries’ shipping connectivity is strongly influenced by their geography. The best-connected countries are those at the continent’s corners, where international shipping routes connect to hub ports, notably in Morocco, Egypt and South Africa. They are followed by sub-regional load centres, notably Djibouti, Togo and Mauritius. The top five African ports on UNCTAD’s liner shipping connectivity index (LSCI) during from the first quarter of 2006 to the third quarter of 2020 are presented in the figure here.

Ports’ intraregional connections

Like in other regions, ports in Africa tend to be generally more connected to each other. These intraregional connections do not necessarily carry trade between neighbouring ports, but the high connectivity is the result of being connected to the same overseas routes, in combination with feeder and trans-shipment services.

For example, Durban and Cape Town in South Africa are connected to each other by services provided by twelve companies. In Angola, Luanda is most connected to Cape Town, South Africa with seven companies, while Mombasa, Kenya is most connected to Dar es Salaam, Tanzania through direct services by ten companies. By comparison, there are only six companies that connect Mombasa, Kenya with Ningbo, China. The connectivity level of Tanger Med, Morocco is highest with Algeciras and Valencia in Spain, through services provided by nine liner companies.

Five of the bottom ten countries ranked according to their port performance (as measured by average port hours weighted by the size of vessels) are located in Africa. The continent requires improved infrastructure and implementation of requisite port and trade facilitation reforms that can help ports in the region to handle the ever-growing demand effectively.

Paul Ridgway, London correspondent of Africa PORTS & SHIPS mariitme news

 

 

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? SHIPS ATTACKED ONE AFTER THE OTHER IN GULF OF GUINEA

Jolly Roger in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Jolly Roger in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

 

 

 

 

 

An absolute spate of attacks on merchant ships operating in the Gulf of Guinea has to raise serious concerns and questions about the ability of local naval or coast guard authorities in tackling this problem. Almost naturally attention focuses on the Nigerian Navy, without question the senior service in the region and probably the only one capable of tackling the rampant piracy head-on, if only there is a true will and intention.

Below are the recent incidents of piracy on merchant shipping:

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? TORM ALEXANDRA APPROACHED BY PIRATES, CHASED BY ITALIAN NAVY

Torm Alexandra. Picture courtesy Vesselfinder, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS MARITIME NEWS
Torm Alexandra. Picture courtesy Vesselfinder

On 7 November 2020 the Singapore-flagged chemical tanker TORM ALEXANDRA (IMO 9466001) was approached and boarded by armed pirates whilst in transit from Lomé. Torm Alexandra had arrived in Lomé from South Africa and Walvis Bay and is currently at Pointe Noire.

The time was 05h33 UTC in position 03°39’48N 002°29’49E, this being…

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? ATTEMPTED BOARDING OF TANKER WESLEY

Chemical tanker Wesley. Picture courtesy Balticshipping.com, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Chemical tanker Wesley. Picture courtesy Balticshipping.com

A second incident on 7 November involved the tanker WESLEY (IMO 8917924) as the Marshall Island-flagged vessel was underway 180 n.miles SSE of Lagos in position…

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? VALLEY OAK

The chemical tanker Valley Oak (formerly Marida Maple). Picture courtesy Shipspotting, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The chemical tanker Valley Oak (formerly Marida Maple). Picture courtesy Shipspotting

Four days after the two above incidents, on 11 November 2020 the Marshall Island-flagged chemical tanker VALLEY OAK (IMO 9438145) became the next victim of pirates making an attempt at board the vessel.

This occurred while sailing deepsea offshore the coast of Benin in position 03° 01.8N 002° 42.0E, 198 n.miles South of Cotonou.

The attempted attack happened at 21h00 UTC and involved what appeared to be a ‘fishing vessel’ exhibiting proper navigation lights which approached the 128-metre tanker at a speed of 16.5 knots, attempting to close down the Valley Oak which had resorted to evasive manoeuvres in an attempt to thwart any boarding.

This step appeared to deter the pirates who ultimately abandoned the chase and broke away. Everyone on the Valley Oak is reported to be safe.

Dryad Global reported this as the 7th reported incident within the Gulf of Guinea within seven days and the 5th within waters off Benin.

The maritime security intelligence agency says these incidents are most likely aimed at conducting kidnap for ransom operations. “Whilst the pirates retain both the capability and intent to target larger vessels, it is highly likely that smaller vessels presenting more opportune targets will become more desirable as time goes on and the risk to the perpetrators increases.

“The perpetrators are likely to be aware that increased time at sea with both the Beninese and Nigerian Navies as well as international Naval vessels belonging to the Italian and Portuguese Navies operating on high alert will significantly increase their own risk. As such it is highly likely that incidents will continue.

“All vessels operating within the area are encouraged to operate at the highest levels of vigilance and deploy full hardening / mitigation measures where possible. The risk profile for the wider Gulf of Guinea region at this time is CRITICAL with attacks assessed as highly likely / expected daily.”

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? Heavylift vessel Zhen Hua 7

Semi-submersible heavylift vessel Zhen Hua 7. Picture by David Meek / MarineTraffic, featyured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Semi-submersible heavylift vessel Zhen Hua 7. Picture by David Meek / MarineTraffic

Our next report involves something different from a tanker, the Chinese heavylift vessel ZHEN HUA 7 (IMO 9166560) which was reported to have been boarded while…

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? GENERAL CARGO VESSEL AM DELTA

The Ghanaian-flagged general cargo ship AM Delta, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The Ghanaian-flagged general cargo ship AM Delta

Yet another ship to be boarded with crew later kidnapped is the general cargo vessel AM DELTA (IMO 9015929), which came under attack as recently as Monday, 16 November at 04h00 UTC.

At that time the ship was drifting some 44 n.miles South of Brass, Nigeria or…

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? TANKER SKS DONGGANG

SKS Donggang. Picture courtesy Shipspotting - Pedro Amaral, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
SKS Donggang. Picture courtesy Shipspotting – Pedro Amaral

The motor tanker SKS DONGGANG (IMO 9461855) is next in our litany of ships at the mercy of armed pirates at sea in the Gulf of Guinea.

This attack took place 59 n.miles South of…

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PIRACY: WHAT IS GOING ON? CONTACT LOST WITH TANKER STELIOS K

Stelios K. Picture by David Mortimer, courtesy Shipspotting, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Stelios K.     Picture by David Mortimer, courtesy Shipspotting

Dryad Global reports that contact has been lost with the tanker STELIOS K (IMO 8679209) which was en route to Lagos in Nigeria.

This was being reported on Tuesday 17 November at…

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WHARF TALK: OTGC discontinues development of liquid bulk terminal at Port of Ngqura

This was an artist's impression of what the proposed liquid bulk terminal would look like. Does the withdrawal of private enterprise mean that Transnet will have to take on its completion and continue with its operation? What effect does this mean for the existing termianl at nearby Port Elizabeth? Once more the port of Ngqura leaves a bucket full of questions - featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
This is an artist’s impression of what the proposed liquid bulk terminal would have looked like. Does the withdrawal of the private operator now mean that Transnet will have to take on its completion and add this as yet another terminal under its care?  What effect does this mean for the existing liquid bulk terminal at nearby Port Elizabeth?   Once more the port of Ngqura, created from a political desire rather than a commercial need, leaves a list of questions     Picture:  supplied

Oiltanking Grindrod Calulo (Pty) Ltd (OTGC) announced Monday (16 November 2020) that the development of its Liquid Bulk Terminal project in the Port of Ngqura has been discontinued.

OTGC was awarded the preferred bidder status in 2011 by Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) to develop a liquid bulk storage terminal in the Port of Ngqura. The facility was intended to replace the existing terminal in Port Elizabeth and service fuel importers in the Nelson Mandela Bay region.

Since the date of award, OTGC has been engaged in negotiating the build, own, operate and transfer (BOOT) agreement, engineering design of the terminal, obtaining commercial commitments from customers, negotiating funding with lenders, and obtaining the required regulatory permits for the construction of the project.

OTGC said on Monday that it has not been able to achieve a commercially viable business case for the proposed terminal. The evolving market and commercial requirements for a reduced terminal capacity and land could not be accommodated in the parameters of the TNPA procurement process.

“OTGC is, therefore, in the regrettable position that it has had to discontinue the project.”

OTGC is a joint venture between operating partner Oiltanking GmbH, a German multinational that is one of the largest independent operators of tank terminals for oils, gases and chemicals worldwide, and local partners Grindrod Limited, a JSE listed Freight and Financial Services company, Calulo Investments (Pty) Ltd, a diversified BBBEE investor in the petrochemical industry and Adopt-a-School Foundation, a non-profit organisation which supports education in disadvantaged schools.

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WAKASHIO STERN REMOVAL CONTRACT AWARDED TO CHINESE SALVORS

Nagashiki Shipping Co, the Japanese manager of the bulker WAKASHIO which went aground on a reef off the east coast of Mauritius, has awarded a contract to China’s Lianyungang Dali Underwater Engineering to remove the stern section of the bulker, which broke in half when another salvage team was attempting to tow the damaged vessel into deep water. Picture above courtesy French Military

This is taking place three months after the Wakashio famously sailed directly into the reef, after…

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JAPANESE NAVY EXCHANGES SHIPS ON GULF OF ADEN COUNTER PIRACY PATROL

The JS Ariake is a Murasame class destroyer, launched in October 2000. She has a semi stealth design, powered by gas turbines which give her a speed of 30kts. Her helicopter is a Mitsubishi SH-60, similar to the Sikorski S-70 design. This is ideal for conducting maritime reconnaissance patrols as it is able to identify potential piracy activity from a huge range and respond accordingly. Picture courtesy of JMSDF, Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The JS Ariake is a Murasame class destroyer, launched in October 2000. She has a semi stealth design, powered by gas turbines which give her a speed of 30kts. Her helicopter is a Mitsubishi SH-60, similar to the Sikorski S-70 design. This is ideal for conducting maritime reconnaissance patrols as it is able to identify potential piracy activity from a huge range and respond accordingly. Picture courtesy of JMSDF

 

After six months conducting counter piracy operations with the Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) in the Gulf of Aden, the Japanese naval ship OHNAMI prepares to return to her home port.

The Takanami class destroyer has been working in support of the CMF’s Combined Task Force (CTF) 151, a counter piracy task force which is currently led by the Turkish Navy.

During their six month deployment JS Ohnami, led…

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IMO’s MSC TAKES PRACTICAL STEPS TO SUPPORT SHIPPING & SEAFARERS

Illustration per www.imo.org IMO © featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Illustration per www.imo.org IMO ©

​​An important reference set of protocols to ensure safe ship crew changes and travel during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has been recognised by IMO’s technical body, the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC).

The 102nd session of the IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 102) took place in virtual session from 4 to 11 November and approved a circular containing protocols for safe crew change during the pandemic.

The Committee approved an MSC circular recognising the industry-developed protocols, which set out general measures and procedures designed to ensure that…

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WHARF TALK: AMSOL active in Port Nolloth

AMSOL supply vessel and tug Aogatoa, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
AMSOL supply vessel and tug Aogatoa

It is not often that Port Nolloth manages to get in the news, which is unfortunate because this little port, situated in the north-western corner of South Africa’s Northern Cape province in what is known as the Richtersveld – home to some of the most beautiful landscape in South Africa – is the port from where the largest offshore diamond mining fleet in the world is supplied by the De Beers logistics base and an offshore supply and support service operated by South Africa’s AMSOL.

Visitors to Port Nolloth will quickly come to love its quiet beauty, friendly residents and close relationship with the sea; reflected in local marine operations supported by two AMSOL launches – ‘Aukwatowa’ and ‘Aogatoa’.

These vessels, built in Cape Town in 2015, remain the critical link in the offshore mining logistics chain – and their Masters, Officers & Crew are committed to providing a safe, efficient and professional service to ensure operational continuity.

The decision to build these vessels locally in South Africa five years ago positively impacted skills development and job creation in the ship building sector at the time, which highlighted AMSOL’s ongoing commitment to the Department of Trade & Industry’s National Industrial Participation Programme (NIPP) and Operation Phakisa.

Local talent pipeline

In recent years, a deliberate focus on local recruitment and development has seen an increased number of ratings and officers from the region working at sea and rising through the ranks. Local resident Captain Leroy du Plessis is an example of how the operation has impacted the community over the years.

Captain Leroy du Plessis, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Captain Leroy du Plessis

He grew up in Port Nolloth and attended the local primary and high schools. With a love of the sea, he pursued a career as a seafarer with AMSOL – achieving his Master’s ticket in 2019. He is one of the Richtersveld residents who now work for the company, having had opportunities to enhance their skills and experience across AMSOL’s operations.

To continue this success, AMSOL initiated a dedicated trainee programme which attracts Port Nolloth residents; three of whom will complete the experiential learning in 2020.

Underpinning this focus on local recruitment and employment is a programme of maritime career awareness and promotion, and various national Career Exhibition initiatives including local events such as the Northern Cape Career Exhibition series, which was due to take place in early 2020, are participated in and sponsored by AMSOL.

Enterprise & Supplier Development

A local supply chain supporting AMSOL’s operations as been important to ensure sustainable economic impact, especially during the COVID19 pandemic. The dedicated Strategic Sourcing team also works closely with suppliers and service providers in Port Nolloth, Springbok and surrounds to ensure continuity in the value chain.

Medical services, transportation, accommodation, victualling and food supplies, vehicle and equipment maintenance are provided by local businesses who create employment in the area. And enterprise development in the more specialist area of marine engineering is still on the radar.

AMSOL says that continuously increasing local procurement remains an important focus for the AMSOL team, whose commitment to socio-economic development underpins its presence in Port Nolloth.

This also remains the foundation of the long-term partnership between De Beers and AMSOL, which aims to create value for all stakeholders, positively impact the region and ensure sustainability.

Did you know?

The naming of AMSOL’s two supply launches was an opportunity to preserve cultural heritage. ‘Aukwatowa’ bears the original name of Port Nolloth, meaning “where the water took away the old man”. ‘Aogatoa’, her sister ship, means “safe return”. These vessel names were chosen in collaboration with local community representatives. source: AMSOL

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WHARF TALK: SAMSA Durban office reopened after COVID-19 closure

SAMSA banner displayed in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) has announced via the cancellation of Marine Notice 38 of 2020 that SAMSA’s Durban office has been reopened.

This follows SAMSA having resolved the Occupational Health & Safety issues experienced at the SAMSA Durban Office, which necessitated the office not being reopened with the resumption of services at the authority’s various offices around the country.

In a statement SAMSA urges stakeholders to continue with online applications to limit physical contact and avoid overcrowding in the offices.

“Those that will need to call into our offices are required to adhere to the national COVID-19 regulations.”

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WHARF TALK: Durban Port Bulletin News

Moshe Motlohi featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Moshe Motlohi, Transnet National Ports Authority General Manager reports:

As promised in the previous issue, the first session of the Maydon Wharf Decongestion stream met. This is the first step into a journey that will address the challenges that have been characterizing Maydon Wharf recently.

As a supplementary activity to this stream the TNPA EXCO set up a team that will be looking at how the Port and Cato Ridge can work together to address congestion and the ever growing back of the port demand. We remain positive about these plans.

It was also a delight and pleasure to having hosted the Deputy Minister of Finance, Dr David Masondo late this week. Fruitful engagements were held and there will definitely be follow up visits.

We have also noted the challenges experienced at the MPT terminal and Maydon Wharf precinct this week. As mentioned, great attention is being given this precinct and with the interventions in the pipeline, we hope to change the current picture. We continue monitoring activities and interventions within our port.

This week we also had the Port Consultative Committee where we engaged with stakeholders. We also has the opportunity to present the Decongestion Task Team Initiative progress to the Transport Forum. The progress report was well received and a lot of support has been given by this structure. We have been invited to share the learnings with the Cape Town Decongestion Task Team.

Personally, this is one of the indicators that something is going in the right direction though a lot of work still needs to be done on our side. We need not to rest, we need to soldier on and continue working around the clock to achieving our Decongestion Task Team objective, which in the main is to Integrate to Decongest the Port of Durban.

With all of this being said, COVID-19 remains a threat to our lives as well as our businesses, therefore be safe and remember to keep a safe social distance, always wear your masks, wash your hands regularly with soap and water or sanitize with an alcohol based sanitizer.  source: TNPA Port of Durban. Note that this reflects the week 2-8 November

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WHARF TALK: Durban Volume and Vessel Call Performance

Maydon Wharf scene. Picture: Terry Hutson, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Maydon Wharf scene. Picture: Terry Hutson

Container Volumes were once again above budget this reporting week. This is as a result of higher than budgeted export and transshipment cargo handled in our terminals. Exports performed very well at 7% above budget, with empty containers exceeding budget by 31%. This was mainly due to the evacuation of empties to China for repacking and export of raw material.

Transshipments also did well at 101% above budget.

Planned vessels also called with larger than budgeted parcel sizes (4804 parcel sizes budgeted and 5552 handled on average per vessel).

For the first time this financial year since the lockdown began, this week has noted the highest throughput at the Port of Durban for the automotive sector. We noted the upsurge for exports at 5970 units loaded with imports also not sitting very far off at just over 4600 units brought in. Automotive volumes were above budget.

The Dry Bulk volumes were above budget. We note that manganese ore exports performed extremely well with a total of 116,984 tons loaded with chrome coming in lower at just over 55,000 tons.

In terms of the agricultural space, wheat imports came in at just over 57,000 tons with fertilizer and woodchips performing marginally well.

Break bulk were below budget. However, there has been a slight improvement from the previous two weeks. This was due to a parcel of 22,351 tons of cement imported in the period as well as steel import registering just under 13,000 tons handled for the week.

Liquid bulk volumes were below budget this reporting week. Refined petroleum was the contributor for the negative variance by achieving 85% below budget.

There were only three refined petroleum vessels handled in this reporting week. High volumes of Crude oil and chemicals were handled which achieved 44% and 26% respectively.  source: TNPA Porrt of Durban.   Note that this reflects the week 2-8 November

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WHARF TALK: Some Cape Town ship movements

Hua Xing Long with jack-up rig loaded, featured in Afreica PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Hua Xing Long with jack-up rig loaded

A couple of interesting ship movements have been reported at Cape Town in the last few days. On Saturday 14 November 2020 the Chinese heavy lift vessel HAU XING LONG (IMO 9808182) arrived in Table Bay at 06h30 after a two month, eighth day voyage from Amsterdam.

From this one must assume she stopped off along the way – the heavylift is carrying on her submersible deck what appears to be two large oil rig supply vessels.

The imposing ship went to anchor off Milnerton where she remained cum Sunday.

Among some of the cargoes Hua Xing Long has carried are the Alpha jacket and foundation piles for TenneT’s Hollandse Kust Zuid offshore wind project in the Netherlands. Loading was performed in the United Arab Emirates and lifted off by heavy lift crane Sleipnir near the installation site.

Hua Hai Long also previously loaded two jack-up rigs, the Banba and the Laebos, and transported them from the UAE to West Africa. One of the rigs had a large protrusion, which required extensive engineering and custom seafastening, which was designed by the engineering team.

Yet another interesting cargo for the vessel involved loading the Enterprise 351 jack-up rig in Singapore and transported her to the US Gulf. Loading operations took place with the vessel under Dynamic positioning (DP mode), a computer-controlled system to automatically maintain a vessel’s position and heading by using its own propellers and thrusters.

Container ship Yangtze Shanghai

A second arrival to arouse some interest is the newbuild container ship YANGTZE SHANGHAI (IMO 9786085) built this year and sailing under the flag of the Marshall Islands. Not much information is yet available for this ship other than her deadweight of 63,868-dwt. Even Equasis.org has no record of her as yet.

Yangtze Shanghai arrived off Cape Town on Sunday 15 November from Cotonou in Benin, remaining in steam offshore until entering port and berthing at the container terminal at 15h00 the same day. The ship arrived in ballast and was high out of the water with no visible containers on board.

Hopefully there will soon be photographs available.     source John Hawkins plus additional information by AP&S

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AT THE CENOTAPH
                Remembrance Sunday
                     8 November 2020

HRH The Princess Royal saluting the Cenotaph after she had laid her wreath. As an Admiral she is Chief Commandant for Women in the Royal Navy. She is also Patron of a number of naval charities. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2020 ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
HRH The Princess Royal saluting the Cenotaph after she had laid her wreath. As an Admiral she is Chief Commandant for Women in the Royal Navy. She is also Patron of a number of naval charities. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2020 ©

A national two-minute silence, led by HM The Queen, took place across the UK on 8 November commemorating the servicemen and women killed in all conflicts since the First World War.

Around 150 personnel from the Royal Navy, the British Army and the Royal Air Force were present at the Cenotaph on Whitehall in London, as members of the Royal Family and senior politicians laid wreaths after the two minute silence at 11h00.

Service Chiefs of the Royal Navy, the Army and the Royal Air Force laid their wreaths at a very sparsely attended parade, slimmed down because of the COVID-19 restrictions. Only 26 veterans paraded and only six Commonwealth High Commissioners laid wreaths, their own tributes and those representing the absentees.

Other Remembrance Sunday ceremonies took place across the country and around the world, including in countries where the armed forces are currently deployed, such as Afghanistan, Cyprus and Somalia.

Over the past year UK troops have been deployed on 35 operations in 30 countries around the world.

Paul Ridgway, London correspondent of Africa PORTS & SHIPS mariitme news

 

 

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

** [Remembrance Day was observed at a number of places across South Africa on 8 November, including at the Durban Cenotaph at Francis Farewell Square opposite the City Hall, where wreaths were laid.]

Part of the Royal Navy contingent in Whitehall. Photo: MoD Crown Copyright 2020 © featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Part of the Royal Navy contingent in Whitehall. Photo: MoD Crown Copyright 2020 ©

 

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MASSACRE REPORTS IN CABO DELGADO, NORTHERN MOZAMBIQUE

Cabo Delgado province, Mozambique where an insurgency involving Jihadist terrorists is taking place, with limited internatonal attention, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Cabo Delgado province, Mozambique where an insurgency involving Jihadist terrorists is taking place, with limited internatonal attention

German media sources are reports a massacre of over 50 people in Mozambique’s Cabo Delgado province, near the village of Muatide.

According to these reports over 50 people were beheaded on the soccer field – yes, that figure is “over 50”.

In France two people were killed in this manner by jihadists and there was an international outcry – justifiably! Has anyone heard of the over 50 being executed in like manner in a remote village in the bush of Mozambique?

To be honest we don’t even know whether this report is factual, except such news from the bush usually proves accurate. We also know of mass evacuations of people fleeing from the area. The port town of Pemba is now home to many of the more than 400,000 refugees.

The Catholic bishop of Pemba, Luiz Fernando Lisboa, was unable to confirm the number of beheadings alleged to have taken place.

No news because of no interest

Have there been headlines in the local South African press? This atrocity compares with news of cyclone damage and other natural calamities in the South-East Africa country – little attention until well after the event.

Twitter is often first to carry most of this local regional news. Here are couple of Twitter comments on the beheadings:

“Suddenly, Black Lives Won’t Matter for liberals because it’s not America,” tweeted user Vaidehi.

Others said there was little international interest because the massacre happened in Africa.

Too true!

This is a maritime news publication and it is not ordinarily our business to report on such matters except that we have strong reasons to maintain an eye on events in the northern section of South Africa’s neighbour, not only because it houses several seaports but also because of the gas production taking place offshore in the Rovuma Basin and the production plant under construction between the harbour towns of Palma and Mocimboa da Praia.

It is necessary to remind readers that Mocimboa da Praia, to the best of our knowledge, remains in the hands of the Islamist insurgents. MdP as it is often referred, was undergoing development as a supply port for the gas industry when the attacks began.    sources: Pinnacle News, Deutsche Welle, Twitter

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IN CONVERSATION: Catalogue of failures behind growing humanitarian crisis in northern Mozambique

Soldiers from the Mozambican army patrol the streets in Mocimboa da Praia following an attack by suspected Islamists in October 2018.  Adrien Barbier/AFP via Getty Images

Cristiano d’Orsi, University of Johannesburg

Cabo Delgado, the northernmost province of Mozambique, has been under attack for three years. The violence was triggered in 2017 when armed men attacked a police station, killing one police officer and critically injuring another. Locals identified the assailants as “al-shabaab”, alluding to an Islamic connection.

This year, the violence has escalated. In August, militants linked to the Islamic State seized the province’s strategic port town. The militants are reported to have formal ties to Islamic State. They are also tapping into local grievances.

The attacks in Cabo Delgado have led to loss of life and severely damaged infrastructure, already badly affected by Cyclone Kenneth in 2019. According to the government, nearly 35,000 houses have either been partially or totally destroyed. People from these communities are now seeking refuge in other Mozambican provinces.

The attacks have also led to disruptions in assistance to those who most need it. These include the elderly, women and children. And last month, the Mozambican Home Affairs Minister, Amade Miquidade, defined the attacks as “crimes against humanity”.

The origins of Cabo Delgado’s violent extremism are complex. Mozambique is a fragile state from many points of view. Cabo Delgado in particular has been called an “ungoverned territory”.

It is the poorest province in Mozambique, with high unemployment and inequitable distribution of wealth. The area is rich in oil deposits, liquefied natural gas fields and gemstones. But people who live there have not benefited.

Since 2017, insurgents have carried out more than 600 attacks in its central and northern districts, causing more than 2,000 deaths. Over 60% were civilians.

The crisis has resulted in growing numbers of internally displaced persons – more than 300,000 by the end of September. That is about 13% of the province’s population. These rising numbers could soon result in a displacement crisis.

Management of the crisis is being hampered on a number of fronts.

The Mozambique government has been unable to openly discuss the crisis and help those in need of support. It is also against updated displacement numbers being published, fearing it may damage the reputation of a province on which the country’s economic future is effectively mortgaged.

A lack of information from the government has helped to create confusion. In addition, it is sticking to a military approach that has been marred by human rights abuses. One example has been the arrest of journalists working in the region.

Certainly one of the biggest mistakes the government made was allowing insurgents to occupy Mocímboa da Praia for a long period of time. New recruits are joining freely.

For their part, humanitarian agencies have been focused largely on cyclone relief efforts. And institutions on the continent have not risen to the occasion. The regional Southern African Development Community has failed to step up to the plate and the African Union has not been able to get its act together. Both have obligations, on paper at least, to assist.

Although the regional body recognised the insurrection in Mozambique as a threat to the entire region in May this year, there has been no regional or international intervention.




Read more:
Why South Africa has a keen interest in extremist violence in northern Mozambique


Massive displacement

Up until the end of 2019, Mozambique’s government had directed its people to remain in their villages despite the repeated attacks. People fleeing for safety were instructed to return to their lands, with the promise that military units would be dispatched to protect them. This official stance delayed the mobilisation of international aid and the opening of accommodation centres for internally displaced persons.

By September 2020, about 1,000 refugees had crossed into neighbouring Tanzania. This has deepened concerns in the international community about the impact of the conflict on the region.

With Cabo Delgado currently recording the second-highest number of COVID-19 cases in Mozambique, population displacements have the potential to accelerate the spread of the virus across borders.

Also in September, Mozambique asked the European Union for help in training its armed forces to battle the insurgency. It also requested medical equipment and humanitarian assistance to help victims of the conflict.

In October, 24 boats carrying 2,700 refugees docked near Pemba on the southern shores of the Cabo Delgado province. They were fleeing violence and insecurity.

The massive displacement of people internally, together with the large numbers of refugees, have now become a major point of concern for the government. Internally displaced Mozambicans are now at risk of abuse. This is particularly true for women and children.

Generally, access to basic services like food and shelter is severely limited. Humanitarian workers are struggling to provide an adequate response to the growing needs within COVID-19 restrictions.

Assistance and obligations

Mozambique is a state party to 15 of the 19 international conventions and protocols against terrorism, and the 1999 African Union Convention on the Prevention and Combating of Terrorism, including the AU’s 2004 terrorism protocol. These allow nation states to seek assistance from the international community in times of crisis occasioned by terror.

The African Union first acknowledged the crisis in February 2020. It announced its willingness to support Mozambique, but could not intervene ahead of the Southern African Development Community, due to the principle of subsidiarity that governs relations between the AU and regional economic communities.

Various instruments of the Southern African Development Community, of which Mozambique is a founding member, oblige the regional body to come to Mozambique’s aid as it continues to battle terrorists and insurgents.

But a summit of the regional body held in Harare in May 2020 failed to agree on what role it could play.

Humanitarian response

These are hard times for Mozambique. The Southern African Development Community and the African Union should develop and implement a coordinated response to the crisis urgently.

For its part, the Mozambican government should take the lead in the humanitarian response to support internally displaced citizens. It needs to dispatch multi-sector teams of professionals to assist the local authorities in registering the displaced, and providing psychosocial support.

As the government demarcates plots of land to resettle the displaced, it should set up more centres to accommodate those who are living with host families. Reports of tensions between host families and displaced persons are becoming more common.

Access to adequate and appropriate shelter and non-food items is critical to ensure that the most vulnerable are not at risk.

Mozambique is a signatory to the AU Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa. As such, the government must ensure that the Mozambican security forces desist from violating the rights of people who have been displaced. In addition, it must ensure that refugees arriving in Pemba are treated with dignity.

On top of that, the United Nations must continue to support the government’s humanitarian response to ensure that its internally displaced populations are protected.

This article was updated to remove an error that made an incorrect reference to Pemba.The Conversation

Cristiano d’Orsi, Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at the South African Research Chair in International Law (SARCIL), University of Johannesburg

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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IMO NEWS OF AFRICA: GABON

IMO Gabon security issue featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS martime news

Gabon is the latest IMO Member State to receive tailor-made, virtual maritime security training from IMO experts. This instruction was held on 2 and 3 November.

According to a report from the excellent IMO Media service Gabon officials received a recap of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and the specific role of the Designated Authority (DA). The latter is a specified organiSation responsible for maritime security that is nominated by a national Government.

It was emphasised that the DA’s role includes setting the appropriate security level, verifying compliance of port facilities and approving port facility security assessments and plans.

Finally, the event included a question and answer session, providing specific advice and information relating to Gabon’s specific needs.

Readers wishing to learn more about IMO’s maritime security work are invited to take a look HERE

IMO’s mandate

The IMO has within its mandate to make trade and travel by sea as safe and secure as possible. To manage and mitigate any threats with the potential to compromise maritime security the Organization develops suitable regulations and guidance through the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) and with input from the Organization’s Facilitation Committee (FAL) and Legal Committee (LEG). See link above for background information on IMO’s involvement with Maritime Security.

The IMO ISPS Code

The IMO’s International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) 1974, as amended, includes provisions adopted to address maritime security matters.

Within SOLAS chapter XI-2 on Special Measures to enhance maritime security is the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code, which is a mandatory instrument for all countries Party to the Convention. The aim of the ISPS Code is to ensure that the applicable ocean going ships and port facilities of IMO Member States are implementing the highest possible standards of security.

Divided into two sections, the ISPS code contains detailed security-related requirements for Governments, port authorities and shipping companies in mandatory Part A, and a series of guidelines on how to meet those requirements in a non-mandatory Part B.

The Organization, through its maritime security capacity building and technical cooperation programme, conducts various national and regional activities, to ensure that the ISPS Code is implemented effectively by Member States. Such activities are available to Member States if and when required.

Paul Ridgway, London correspondent of Africa PORTS & SHIPS mariitme news

 

 

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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GHANA INLAND PORT AT BOANKRA GETS UNDERWAY

 

Construction of the $330 million Boankra Integrated Logistics Terminal (BILT) in Ghana has commenced.

Ghana map with the location of the Boankra inland terminal, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Ghana map with location of the Boankra inland terminal

Launched earlier this month by Ghana’s president Nana Akufo-Addo the inland terminal near Kumasi is being regarded as a dry port extension to the Tema Port.

Due for completion in 2023, the terminal is expected to increase the movement of goods and services in the country and also facilitate transit trade between Ghana and the landlocked countries of Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger.

It has taken 18 years to find a concessionaire for the BILT. The Ashanti Port Services Limited, a consortium of Afum Quality Limited of Ghana and DSS Associate of South Korea, finally won the bid to bring life to the project.

The concession agreement will last for 30 years including a 3-year construction period for the development of various project facilities on a 413-acre land in Boankra, which is near Kumasi in the Ashanti Region.

Boankra is served by the eastern network of Ghana Railways.

BILT is an ultra-modern integrated logistics terminal consisting of a Container Service Yard, Container Freight Station, Reefer, Warehouses, Truck Parking Area, Trucker’s Facilities, Fuel Station, Commercial Complex, Freight Forwarders Offices, and facilities for postal, telecommunication, utilities services, among others.

President Akufo-Addo said the implementation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) would be buoyed by the construction of the BILT which will ensure “…..an effective and efficient transport system, especially as Ghana is playing host to the Secretariat.”

He called for BILT and other similar infrastructure projects, such as the development of the Keta Port, the Tema-Akosombo Railway Line, and the ongoing port expansion projects in Tema and Takoradi Ports, to make a positive contribution in ensuring that Ghana derives maximum benefits from AfCFTA.

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PORT OF LONG BEACH HITS MILESTONE AMID COVID-19 CRISIS

Port of Long Beach featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Port of Long Beach

 

More than 800,000 TEU moved through US second-busiest seaport

It was reported on 12 November that the Port of Long Beach achieved yet another single-month record in October by processing more than 800,000 cargo containers for the first time in its 109-year history.

Dockworkers and terminal operators moved 806,603 TEU in October and broke the best month record set in September 2020 by more than 11,000 TEU. Trade was up 17.2% from October 2019.

In the words of Mario Cordero, Executive Director of the Port of Long Beach: “The peak holiday shipping season is supporting our ongoing recovery and record highs, but we are now facing a new wave of COVID-19 cases spreading across the country and remain locked in a trade dispute with China. We are optimistic about the gradual economic recovery while bracing for any shocks still to come.”

Long Beach Harbor Commission President Frank Colonna added: “Our string of recent records show that our persistence and ability to work with industry and workforce partners allowed us to continue growing amid a critical time for our nation. The Port of Long Beach has a lengthy history of adapting to the needs of our customers during the best of times and the most difficult of times.”

Surge in cargo

This surge in cargo comes as retailers continue to prepare for the holiday shopping season, a rise in e-commerce and an increased demand for gardening equipment, pet supplies and musical instruments.

Long Beach Port had 94 container ship calls in October, 18 of which were unscheduled vessels that made up for voyages cancelled earlier this year.

October’s figures mark the third time in 2020 that the Port has broken an all-time record for cargo movements within a single month.

In July 2020, the Port processed 753,081 TEU, surpassing the previous single-month record set in June 2018 by nearly 900 TEU. The record fell a second time in September 2020, when the Port processed 795,580 TEU. October 2020 surpassed the previous month’s mark by 1.4%.

Imports jumped 19.4% last month (October) compared to October 2019 with 402,408 TEU, while exports were down 12.9% to 114,679 TEU. Empty containers headed back overseas grew 31.8% to 289,517 TEU.

It was reported that the Port has moved 6,513,908 TEU during the first ten months of 2020, 2.3% up from the same period in 2019.

For complete cargo numbers readers are invited to visit: CLICK HERE

About POLB

The Port of Long Beach is one of the world’s premier seaports, a gateway for trans-Pacific trade and a trailblazer in goods movement and environmental stewardship.

With 175 shipping lines connecting Long Beach to 217 seaports, the Port handles $170 billion in trade annually, supporting more than 575,000 Southern California jobs.

Paul Ridgway, London correspondent of Africa PORTS & SHIPS mariitme news

 

 

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

** [Comment: In several respects Long Beach may be compared with the Port of Durban, though on a significantly different scale of size. Both are principal gateway’s into their interiors as well as servicing their local industrial and commercial base. With that in mind compare how Durban and South Africa remain in a state far from improving its import or export levels.]

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GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

in partnership with – APO

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EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

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THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Education is what remains after one has forgotten everything he learned in school.”

– Albert Einstein

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