Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news 9 June 2019

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002
Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

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TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

These news reports are updated on an ongoing basis. Check back regularly for the latest news as it develops – where necessary refresh your page at www.africaports.co.za

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FIRST VIEW 1: DEN

Den. Pictures: Trevor Jones, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

 

Den. Pictures: Trevor Jones, features in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Den at Durban’s B berth, which incidentally is destined to become the cruise terminal berth.       Pictures: Trevor Jones

Being the busiest port in sub-Saharan Africa, the port of Durban has a fairly large number of ships arriving or sailing each week, and as a result there are from time to time vessel arrivals that are a little unusual in one way or another. Two of the arrivals last week fall into this ‘noteworthy’ category, the first, shown above here, being the former Chilean RoRo cargo and passenger ferry EDEN, (before that MAZATLAN STAR) and now renamed DEN (IMO 8120686) for what is presumably her final voyage to the breakers. Previously in Navimag employ the ferry is now owned and managed by interests from Dubai. The above pictures are by Trevor Jones

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FIRST VIEW 2: MORNING PEACE

Morning Peace. Picture: Keith Betts, gfeatured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Morning Peace.     Picture: Keith Betts

The arrival of a RoRo vehicle carrier is not by itself something noteworthy, unless it was a maiden voyage or the largest car carrier yet seen. A casual observer last week might therefore have been excused for jumping to such a conclusion because when the MORNING PEACE (IMO: 9780627) arrived she was met with an impressive water display from the attending tug. The interest with the 2017-built ship however lay in her cargo bay, and not with the ship. Among the motor vehicles for discharge at Durban were two helicopters, which have featured in our pages recently and which will shortly be going into service at the ports of Durban and Richards Bay, replacing older aircraft. Their story can be found here: TRANSNET PREPARES TO TAKE DELIVERY OF TWO NEW AW109SP HELICOPTERS This picture is by Keith Betts

The next two pictures shows the water display from the tug UMBILO that was one of two  harbour tugs to greet the Morning Peace, presenting an attractive shower of water on either side of the approaching ship.   These pictures are by Keith Betts

Tug Umbilo welcoming car carr Morning Peace to Durban and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online, picture by Keith Betts

Durban harbour tug providing a welcome to the car carrier Morning Peace, by Keith Betts and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS online

 

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D-DAY 75 COMMEMORATION 1944-2019

Normandy Thursday: All services were well represented in the D-Day commemoration events of 6 June 2019. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 © featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Normandy, Thursday: All services were well represented in the D-Day commemoration events of 6 June 2019. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©

Normandy 6 June

On D-Day, 6 June 1944, Allied Forces launched a combined naval, air and land assault on Nazi-occupied France. Codenamed Operation Overlord, the Allied landings on the Normandy beaches marked the start of a long and costly campaign to liberate NW Europe from Nazi occupation.

Early on 6 June Allied airborne forces parachuted into drop zones across northern France. Gliders towed by bombers and transport aircraft were also used to convey troops and equipment. Ground troops then landed across five assault beaches named: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword. By the end of the day, the Allies had established a foothold along the coast and could begin their advance into France. In all the assault involved nearly 160,000 troops being landed.

An Allied coalition delivered success, although the word coalition was not used at the time, here was an Allied Expeditionary Force. In the Normandy invasion 14 Allied nations took part: the UK, the US, Canada, France, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, The Netherlands, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Luxembourg, Poland, Norway and Greece. Forces from other nations of the Commonwealth also took part.

It must be remembered that at the time of D-Day invasion Allied forces were still fighting in Italy, Burma and in the Pacific with a U-boat menace in every ocean. By June 1944 the war had nearly a year to run to victory for V-E Day was not until 8 May 1945. More than a year would elapse until the Japanese were defeated with V-J Day being on 15 August 1945.

The naval component

In the region of 7,000 warships, including battleships, destroyers, minesweepers, escorts and assault craft took part in Operation Neptune, the naval part of Operation Overlord.

Here Allied naval forces escorted landing craft to the beaches. Warships carried out bombardments on enemy coastal installations in advance and during the landings. Naval gunfire provided invaluable support for the invading troops.

Remembrance Service

On 6 June this year the Royal British Legion’s Service of Remembrance at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery at Bayeux was attended by HRH The Prince of Wales and the Prime Minister with service chiefs and veterans.

This event saw a tri-service Guard of Honour supported by a military band; a procession of Royal British Legion Standards; a short parade of veterans; a religious service; and the laying of wreaths at the Cross.

Bayeux was the first town liberated by the allied forces after D-Day.

A useful brochure on the British D-Day commemoration is now available from the Ministry of Defence part of the Government website CLICK HERE:

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

Normandy, Thursday: During the Royal British Legion’s Service of Remembrance at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery at Bayeux, there was a flypast of a Dakota and a Spitfire bearing the Overlord stripes worn by all Allied aircraft during the invasion. Picture: MoD Crown Copright 2019 ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Normandy, Thursday: During the Royal British Legion’s Service of Remembrance at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery at Bayeux, there was a flypast of a Dakota and a Spitfire bearing the Overlord stripes worn by all Allied aircraft during the invasion. Picture: MoD Crown Copright 2019 ©

 

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NEW GREEN IN-WATER HULL CLEANING TECHNOLOGY CAN CREATE LOCAL JOBS

mobile in-water hull cleaning technology developed, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The Twister Vacu-Cart and Reclaim System is highly mobile

New environmental regulations to stop the translocation of alien species from fouling South African harbours comes with an added benefit – new technology and new jobs.

This is the view of John Kennedy, a US entrepreneur and partner in South African maritime technology company Schomberg, that has co-developed a unique hull cleaning machine, a vacuum cart, that could revolutionise the shipping industry. The vacu-cart can be controlled by a diver or operated remotely.

Kennedy was reacting to the announcement by Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) that in future permit holding companies will be allowed to clean the hulls of ships while vessels are berthed in local ports. See TNPA PORTS TO USHER IN IN-WATER HULL CLEANING

Advances in technology allows companies to combat biofouling during the cleaning of hulls by using in-water hull-cleaning services.

Schomberg has plans to manufacture under license the Twister Vacu-Cart and Reclaim System in Durban, “creating much needed employment” Kennedy said.

close upo of the Twister vacu-cart hull cleaning system
close-up of the system

The Twister Vacu-Cart and Reclaim System is the product of five years of research and development in three countries and meets International Maritime Organization environmental regulations.

Kennedy, a philanthropist with strong roots in KwaZulu-Natal and MIT lecturer in his home city of Boston in the US, applauded the TNPA decision to reintroduce in-water hull cleaning in SA ports, as a commitment to protecting the marine environment.

Many countries have been concerned about the threat biofouling poses to marine ecosystems. Marine organisms, like barnacles and mussels, that attach themselves to hulls of ships are bad for the environment by slowing down ships, increasing the carbon footprint of vessels and putting local marine life at risk when these organisms are cleaned off the hulls of ships in distant ports.

He says his team has developed a unique and environmentally friendly approach to underwater hull cleaning that ensures minimal ecological impact. He believes the Twister Vacu-Cart and Reclaim System would have appeal to all ship owners and ports internationally.

The cleaning and capture system transfers the captured debris to the surface where it goes through an internationally certified filtration process to eliminate and neutralise the Alien Invasive Species (AIS) before the filtered water is discharged back into the sea. The solid debris is disposed of at registered landfill sites.

For further information: Mark Geyser (Schomberg) +27 82 552 5073

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ROSY FUTURE PREDICTED FOR TANZANIA’S LAKES VICTORIA AND TANGANYIKA

Lake Victoria's best-known lake ship, mv VICTORIA seen here at the port of Mwanza, featured in article in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Lake Victoria’s best-known lake ship, mv VICTORIA seen here at the port of Mwanza

Waterborne trade on Africa’s Great Lakes is seeing a turnaround with increased volumes and similar improvement in revenue.

On Lake Victoria the Tanzanian southern port of Mwanza has seen cargo volumes increase from 84,615 tonnes handled in the 2017/18 financial year to 146,287 tonnes during the 10 months between July 2018 and May 2019, a 72% increase.

Revenue collected during this period rose to Sh1.138 billion (US$493,664) according to the Tanzanian newspaper Citizen quoting…

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AU FORGES AHEAD WITH AfCFTA OPERATIONAL PHASE

South Africa's new Trade & Industry minister Ebrahim Patel, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
South Africa’s new Trade & Industry minister Ebrahim Patel

The establishment of the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) can be a game-changer for the local economy, providing a massive market for South African goods and services, says newly appointed Trade and Industry Minister Ebrahim Patel.

“If we can get the institutions and infrastructure right and build a deep business and social partnership in South Africa, the AfCFTA can add many billions of rands to the GDP, create large numbers of new industrial jobs, attract and expand investment and strengthen the economy,” Patel said.

He noted that exports to the rest of the continent already account for…

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ANGOLA LAUNCHES FIRST-EVER MARGINAL FIELDS BIDDING ROUND

In yesterday’s News we carried a story that Angola has stepped up efforts to becoming Africa’s hottest oil & gas frontier by launching the first phase of its new six-year oil licensing strategy.

Angolan President João Manuel Gonçalves Lourenço, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Angolan President João Manuel Gonçalves Lourenço

The new licensing round covers It covers a total of 10 blocks in the Namibe Basin and one block in the Benguela Basin.

This is not the only landmark bidding to be launched in Angola this year. The National Agency of Petroleum, Gas and Biofuels (ANPG) is also launching Angola’s first-ever Marginal Fields Bidding Round, which is…

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LARGE-SCALE SEARCH FOR TWO MISSING FISHING BOATS OFF WESTERN CAPE

Missing fishing vessel washed up, as reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Washed-up fishing vessel. Picture: NSRI Simonstown Station 10

A media release issued by the National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) has revealed a large-scale search taking place along the Western Cape for two small fishing craft carrying five men.

The search so far has involved several NSRI stations on the West Cape coast, the airborne sea rescue unit, the South African Air Force, a SA Navy submarine, shipping at sea, coastwatchers on the shore and other authorities and individuals.

The one search was for an open rigid inflatable boat in False Bay with three men on board. Darren Zimmerman, NSRI Simonstown station commander reports:

At 17h03, Tuesday 4 June, NSRI Simonstown duty crew were activated by the Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) following reports of three local fishermen on a small open rigid inflatable boat adrift in False Bay with motor mechanical failure. The fishermen estimated that they were between Smitswinkel Bay and Pringle Bay and that they had been drifting without motor power since earlier in the day while fishing in the Cape Point area when their motor failed, reportedly on Tuesday morning.

Shortly after the three fishermen had raised the alarm cellphone contact and any means of communications with the fishermen was lost.

A colleague of theirs, and the owner of a White and Blue rigid inflatable boat in the Strand, informed NSRI that earlier, at 12h00, Tuesday 4 June, two local men had launched his boat at Harbour Island, Gordons Bay, to go to the aid of the three fishermen who were adrift in False Bay. They have not returned.

Our NSRI Simonstown sea rescue craft Spirit of Safmarine III and Spirit of Surfski II were launched to begin a search and our sea rescue [land] vehicle responded to a height above Simonstown to look-out, our NSRI coast watchers were activated to keep a look-out and TNPA activated NSRI Kommetjie who dispatched their sea rescue vehicle to Cape Point to assist with communications and shoreline patrols.

More NSRI stations activated

NSRI Gordons Bay, NSRI Strandfontein, NSRI Kleinmond and NSRI Hout Bay were activated.

NSRI Hout Bay dispatched the sea rescue craft Nadine Gordimer and NSRI Gordons Bay dispatched the sea rescue craft Jack & Irene. NSRI Strandfontein, NSRI Gordons Bay and NSRI Kleinmond dispatched their sea rescue vehicles to cover a shoreline search.

A cold front, strong winds and heavy sea conditions, with up to 6.5 metre swells affected the Cape coastline on Tuesday.

MRCC (Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre) assisted NSRI commanders plotting and coordinating search patterns and the SA Air Force and NSRI ASR (Airborne Sea Rescue) were placed on alert.

Telkom Maritime Radio Services broadcast an all ships alert for vessels in the False Bay area and beyond False Bay to keep a look out for the boat adrift with three fishermen on the one boat and for the White and Blue 5.5 metre RIB with two fishermen on the second boat.

SA Navy and SAAF join the search

Ships at sea in the False Bay area kept a look-out and two fishing vessels assisted in a search and the SA Navy submarine SAS MANTHATISI conducted a surface water search between Cape Point and Simonstown.

On Wednesday morning NSRI Hermanus, NSRI ASR and the SA Air Force 22 Squadron joined the search.

NSRI Hermanus launched the sea rescue craft South Star and their sea rescue vehicle responded to conduct shoreline patrols and two SA Air Force helicopters, an Oryx and a Lynx, from 22 Squadron flew search patterns.

Boat adrift

During an extensive ongoing search and rescue operation eye-witnesses, on Wednesday afternoon, in Sandbaai, between Onrus and Hermanus, reported a boat appearing to be adrift and approaching the backline breaking waves and looking like the boat would run aground at Sandbaai.

NSRI Hermanus, WC Government Health EMS, EMR ambulance services, the SA Police Services and an SA Air Force helicopter responded to investigate and on arrival on the scene it was found to be the missing fishing boat (with the three fishermen) and the boat had capsized in the waves at Sandbaai and washed ashore and the three fishermen had washed ashore.

NSRI medics and EMS paramedics conducted extensive CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation) efforts on one of the fisherman but sadly [despite] all efforts to resuscitate the man he was declared deceased by paramedics.

Condolences are conveyed to family and friends of the deceased man.

Police have opened an inquest docket.

Survivors

The two survivors were medically treated by paramedics on the scene for hypothermia and they have been transported to hospital by ambulance in serious but stable conditions and are expected to make full recoveries.

MRCC is continuing to coordinate a search and rescue operation for the two local men on the White and Blue 5.5 metre rigid inflatable boat that launched at Harbour Island on Tuesday 4 June, at approximately midday.

NSRI Simonstown, NSRI Strandfontein, NSRI Gordons Bay, NSRI Kleinmond, the EMS/AMS Skymed Rescue helicopter, the SA Police Services and Cape Town Fire and Rescue Services dive unit are engaged in an ongoing search and local neighbourhood watches and Law Enforcement have been requested to keep a look-out.

NSRI are informed that this boat and her two crew did not rendezvous with the three fishermen in False Bay on Tuesday.

All ships alert

An all ships alert is being broadcast by Telkom Maritime Radio Services for vessels in the False Bay area to keep a look-out.

NSRI commend the ships at sea, fishing vessels and private boats that are keeping a lookout and we appeal to the public along the False Bay coastline and Hermanus and beyond Hermanus to keep a lookout for the two fishermen on the White and Blue RIB.

Thoughts are with the families of the two missing men in this difficult time.

  • report by NSRI Simonstown station commander Darren Zimmerman

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PORTSMOUTH AND D-DAY 75 COMMEMORATION 1944-2019

The Royal British Legion’s chartered vessel Boudicca with 300 veterans of the original landings on board seen here outward bound from Portsmouth to Normandy flanked by warship escorts. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The Royal British Legion’s chartered vessel Boudicca with 300 veterans of the original landings on board seen here outward bound from Portsmouth to Normandy flanked by warship escorts. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©

On 5 June the City of Portsmouth paid tribute to Normandy veterans in the presence of HM the Queen, world leaders, the general public and the Armed Forces.

At an international event on Southsea Common, an audience of veterans, military, senior figures and local residents watched an hour-long performance telling the story of D-Day and the meticulous planning by Allied forces that paved the way for the invasion of Normandy.

HM the Queen paid tribute to those who took part and those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the largest armada the world had ever seen. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
HM the Queen paid tribute to those who took part and those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the largest armada the world had ever seen. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©

The event featured testimony from veterans, theatrical performances and live music culminating in a flypast of 24 aircraft including the Red Arrows and the iconic Spitfire.

Veterans then enjoyed a reception where they met world leaders in person before the majority were transferred to mv BOUDICCA chartered by the Royal British Legion.

By the end of 5 June in France, troops had already arrived with 150 from 16 Air Assault Brigade jumping from RAF Hercules aircraft. Amongst those jumping with Red Devils parachute display team were 94-year-old Jock Hutton and 95-year-old Harry Read.

In the early evening Boudicca sailed for France escorted by warships of the Royal Navy with the Prime Minister, the Defence Secretary and the First Sea Lord bidding them farewell from HMS Queen Elizabeth, the biggest ship in the history of the Royal Navy.

More warships lined the intended route of Boudicca into the Channel in commemoration of, and in gratitude for, their voyage 75 years before on 6 June 1944.

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

HM the Queen paid tribute to those who took part and those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the largest armada the world had ever seen. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Prime Minister Theresa May, Penny Mordaunt Secretary of State for Defence and the First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Philip Jones seen here with the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth for the D-Day75 Celebrations as part of tribute to Normandy veterans in the presence of world leaders, the general public and the Armed Forces. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 © 

 

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ANGOLA COMMENCES LICENSING HIGH-POTENTIAL BLOCKS IN NAMIBE & BENGUELA BASINS

Map of Angola, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS online

Angola has stepped up efforts to becoming Africa’s hottest oil & gas frontier by launching the first phase of its new six-year oil licensing strategy.

The licensing round was launched yesterday (Wednesday) by the CEO of the National Agency of Petroleum, Gas and Biofuels (ANPG) Paulino Jerónimo during the opening ceremony of the Angola Oil & Gas Conference 2019.

It covers a total of 10 blocks, including Blocks 11, 12, 13, 27, 28, 29, 41, 42 and 43 in the Namibe Basin, and Block 10 in the Benguela Basin.

“The promotion of the blocks is…

Interested parties who wish to be contacted for further details should contact licensing_round2019@anpg.co.ao

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TIGHT LINES AT NEW FORESHORE FISHING VENUE (EAST LONDON)

The Foreshore area on East London's West Bank where fishing is now permitted, as reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The Foreshore area on East London’s West Bank where fishing is now permitted

The local angling community has responded enthusiastically to Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA)’s reopening of a section of the East London Foreshore for public fishing.

TNPA has processed more than 800 fishing permits for the area within the first six weeks of its opening and anglers have been hooking big catches in the area.

East London Port Manager, Sharon Sijako, said fishing enthusiasts were using the area responsibly so far.

fishing at East London's West Bank Foreshore, as reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

“We’re pleased that local anglers have access to another non-sensitive and convenient site in the port that falls outside of our commercial operations. We hope the three-month trial period will remain mutually beneficial so that we can make this a permanent arrangement,” she said.

The Foreshore was reopened on Monday, 15 April 2019 after ongoing engagements with the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (BCMM) and the Buffalo City Association of Salt Water Anglers (BCASA).

See our report ANGLERS GAIN ACCESS TO PORT OF EAST LONDON WEST BANK FORESHORE

fishing catches at East London's West Bank Foreshore, as reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime newsIn early 2018 TNPA re-opened the Orient Pier to the fishing fraternity in a joint agreement with the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality, which administers Orient Beach. TNPA is currently upgrading the Pier surface area, installing ramps to assist wheelchair bound fishermen and replacing the steps leading to the lower section of the Pier. Fishermen also make use of the site adjacent to the West Bank side of the Buffalo Bridge.

Permits to the Foreshore are available at R50 each. Due to the expected initial high demand for permits, BCASA along with Bilimoria Fishing Tackle shop in Beacon Bay and Vincent have been facilitating the completion of indemnity forms and cash collection. TNPA issues the permits through BCASA upon receipt of bulk payments and signed indemnity forms.

The stakeholder committee will meet again during June to address the isolated incidents of trespassing by non-permit holders on the Foreshore. This occurs at night which is outside of the permitted hours of 6am and 6pm for fishing on the Foreshore.

Excellent catches at East London's recently 're-opened' West Bank Foreshore, as reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

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CARRIERS BEWARE: CLARIFYING THE ONUS IN CARGO DAMAGE CLAIMS

Shipping lawyer, Carol Holness, writes the below article which,  although niche, has strong interest.

It refers to an important judgment for cargo owners and their marine insurers. The UK Supreme Court has held that a carrier seeking to rely on an inherent vice exception to liability contained in the Hague Rules when defending a cargo damage claim must prove either that it took reasonable care of the cargo – but the damage occurred nonetheless; or that whatever steps might have been taken to protect the cargo from damage would have failed in light of the cargo’s inherent propensities.

The decision is a significant development of the law applicable to cargo damage claims. Previously cases had placed the onus on the cargo owner to prove negligence by the carrier where the carrier had alleged that the claim fell within one of the exceptions to liability. The Supreme Court has now placed the onus to disprove negligence squarely in the carrier’s court.

by Carol Holness
Senior Associate
NORTON ROSE FULBRIGHT in South Africa
nortonrosefulbright.com

In an important judgment for cargo owners and their marine insurers, the UK Supreme Court has held that a carrier who seeks to rely on an inherent vice exception to liability contained in the Hague Rules when defending a cargo damage claim must prove either that it took reasonable care of the cargo but the damage occurred nonetheless; or else that whatever steps might have been taken to protect the cargo from damage would have failed in light of the cargo’s inherent propensities.

This judgment has clarified the position of cargo owners and their insurers with claims for damaged cargo. The case draws an important distinction between avoidable damage caused by the inherent characteristics of the cargo which can be catered for and inherent vice in the cargo which cannot.

Carol Holness of Norton Rose Fulbright, writer of article appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Carol Holness

In Volcafe Ltd and others v Compania Sud Americana De Vapores SA[1] the claimants (appellants) were the owners and bill of lading holders in respect of nine consignments of bagged coffee beans shipped from Colombia to Bremen on various ships owned by the respondent (defendant). The shipowner was also the carrier under the bills of lading which incorporated the Hague Rules and were subject to English law.

While this case dealt with the Hague Rules (which had been contractually incorporated into the bills of lading), the relevant provisions of the Hague and Hague Visby Rules relating to a carrier’s liability and exceptions to liability for cargo damage are the same. Therefore the judgment applies to claims for cargo damage under either the Hague or Hague Visby Rules. Almost all cargo is carried under one of these two regimes, either because of their incorporation into the bills of lading, or because they are compulsorily applicable to shipments to or from a state that has ratified one of these Conventions.

The bills of lading were on a LCL/FCL basis which meant that the carrier was contractually responsible for preparing the containers and packing the cargoes into the containers. Coffee beans absorb, store and emit moisture. If coffee beans are carried in unventilated containers, the containers must be lined with sufficient absorbent material in order to prevent condensation and damage to the coffee beans.

When the containers arrived in Bremen, a number of bags had suffered water damage as a result of condensation. The cargo owners claimed against the carrier for the damage alleging that:

1. The carrier was in breach of its duties as bailee and had failed to deliver the cargoes in the same good order and condition recorded in the bills of lading; alternatively
2. The carrier was in breach of the Hague Rules in that it had failed to properly and carefully load, handle, stow, carry, keep, care for and discharge the cargoes.

The carrier defended the claim on the basis of a Hague Rules defence, arguing that the damage was caused by inherent vice. This was because, they argued, the coffee beans were unable to withstand the ordinary levels of condensation which formed in containers during voyages from warmer to cooler climates. The cargo owners in turn argued that any inherent characteristic of the cargoes which resulted in damage only did so because of the carrier’s negligent failure to take proper measures to protect the cargoes.

The two key issues dealt with on appeal to the Supreme Court were:

1. Does a cargo owner bear the legal burden of proving a breach of the Hague Rules, or is it the carrier, once loss or damage to the cargo has been established, who must prove its compliance with its obligations as bailee; and,
2. Where the carrier seeks to rely on an exception to liability on one of the various grounds listed in the Hague Rules, and the carrier has alleged facts to bring the case within the scope of such an exception, is the onus on the cargo owner to prove that it was the negligence of the carrier which caused the excepted peril (such as inherent vice)?

The carrier argued that as a matter of English law, the party that makes an allegation must prove its case. Therefore, as the cargo owners had alleged that there had been a breach of, for example, the Hague Rules, they bore the onus of proving that there had been a breach. And, they argued, if the carrier was able to prove that the damage had occurred as a result of one of the exceptions to liability listed in the Hague Rules (such as inherent vice), then the onus was on the cargo owners to positively prove that it was only because of the carrier’s negligence that the cargo’s inherent characteristics (such as its propensity to sweat) had resulted in damage.

The Supreme Court dismissed both of these arguments. A contract for the carriage of goods by sea remains a contract of bailment. Once a bailor (in this case, the cargo owner) proves that there has been damage to its goods, the onus is on the bailee to prove that it took reasonable care of the goods or that any lack of reasonable care did not cause the loss or damage. This is because the bailee is in possession of the goods and therefore it may be difficult or impossible for anyone else to account for the loss or damage to the goods. Therefore, where cargo is shipped in apparent good order and condition but is discharged damaged, the carrier, as bailee, bears the burden of proving that the damage was not due to the carrier’s breach of its obligation to take reasonable care.

Where a carrier seeks to rely on one of the exceptions to liability listed in the Hague Rules, it is accepted law that the carrier bears the onus of proving that the matter falls within the scope of the relevant exception. However, the Supreme Court went on to find that if the carrier could and should have taken precautions which would have prevented some inherent characteristic of the cargo from resulting in damage, that characteristic is not inherent vice. Accordingly, in order to be able to rely on the exception for inherent vice, the carrier must show either that it took reasonable care of the cargo but the damage occurred nonetheless; or else that whatever steps might have been taken to protect the cargo from damage would have failed in light of the cargo’s inherent propensities.

On the facts in this particular case, the Supreme Court found that the carrier had the legal burden of proving that it took due care to protect the cargo from damage arising from the cargoes’ inherent characteristics, such as its propensity to sweat, and that the carrier had failed to prove that it had properly lined the containers to protect the coffee beans. Accordingly the Court allowed the cargo owners’ appeal and reinstated the original court’s decision in their favour.

The Supreme Court’s decision is a significant development of the law applicable to cargo damage claims. Previously cases had placed the onus on the cargo owner to prove negligence on the part of the carrier where the carrier had alleged that the claim fell within one of the exceptions to liability. The Supreme Court has now placed the onus to disprove negligence squarely in the carrier’s court.

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‘FIRE IN THE HOLD’ – A RELIC OF THE PAST WITH THERMAL EVENT MONITORING

 

MV HYUNDAI FORTUNE which experienced a major fire-related at sea in 2006 in the Gulf of Aden. Within the pic is a photo showing how thermal events would look to the operator of a thermal optic camera, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
MV HYUNDAI FORTUNE which experienced a major fire-related at sea in 2006 in the Gulf of Aden. Within the pic is a photo showing how thermal events would look to the operator of a thermal optic camera

The phrase ‘fire in the hold’ could be consigned to the dustbin of maritime history if the shipping industry was obliged to install thermal imaging systems on all new cargo vessels.

Critical thermal event alarm notification and monitoring solutions have received renewed attention from the global maritime sector following a series of devastating fire-related incidents involving cargo ships.

“Thermal-based events have a long and unfortunate history in shipping,” says Philip Smerkovitz, Managing Director of thermal imaging specialist, GoThermal.co.za. “And they don’t always involve raging infernos.”

Mr Smerkovitz points to the fact that the Titanic, for example, was on fire for days before it sank. “We know now that an out-of-control coal fire played a part in the sinking of the world’s most famous vessel,” he says.

Just last month, a major fire in the coal repository of a bulk carrier was reported in the Indian port of Haldia. The fire was reported to be ‘major’ and needing the attention of all firefighting vehicles in the area.

“The problem with coal fires is that the nature of the product means smoldering embers can often be inadvertently brought aboard. This is where thermal imaging really comes into its own,” Mr Smerkovitz says.

Thermal imaging solutions installed at coal plants can help ensure that contaminated product can be scanned for thermal signatures before coal is then transported to the vanning area where it is further scanned and monitored before being taken aboard. Aboard ship, handheld equipment can further complete the thermal safety loop.

GoThermal.co.za has collaborated with world leaders in thermal imaging, FLIR Systems, to develop, sell and support critical thermal temperature notification and monitoring solutions ideally-suited for the local and overseas maritime industry.

Remotely monitoring equipment and facilities with thermal cameras can detect potential issues unseen to the human eye. This means a rise in temperature amongst coal cargo, for example, can be detected long before the fire stage.

The solutions offered by GoThermal.co.za manage temperature-related events remotely and in real-time via the web using thermal sensors connected to video alarm verification servers.

Monitoring and regulating specific temperature ranges is critical when transporting coal, in particular, to prevent critical, fire-generating temperatures from being reached. “Just a few cameras can scan the biggest hold searching for events likely to lead to fire if left unchecked,” Mr Smerkovitz adds.

Any industry where temperature is critical in the production or delivery process can benefit from thermographic camera sensors connected to video alarms as in the GoThermal.co.za solutions. Temperature events can now be managed from any Internet-enabled remote location effortlessly using any iOS or Android mobile device.

Thermal cameras produce radiometric images of the scene, allowing for non-contact temperature measurement in every pixel. Alarms can be triggered by selecting areas for maximum or minimum temperature thresholds or changes in temperature. Multiple areas in a scene can be monitored simultaneously for critical changes.

“Users can view entire scenes of events in seconds on their mobile devices and use remote functionality from our app to make and action decisions quickly no matter where they are in the world,” says Smerkovitz. Control rooms and desktop computers can also be brought into the loop.”

Events can be responded to swiftly and precisely to minimise or even totally prevent losses and damages caused by temperature-related incidents. “Our solutions are capable of detecting the smallest fluctuations in temperature that can have really big cost implications later on if not properly and immediately managed,” Smerkovitz says.

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MOVE TO ESTABLISH RICHARDS BAY PORT WELFARE COMMITTEE

 

Establishing a Port Welfare Committee at the Portof Richards Bay, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

In a follow-through to the inaugural meeting of the Port Welfare Committee in Durban last Wednesday – see that report CLICK HERE, the leadership of Transnet National Ports Authority at the Port of Richards Bay met met with the Merchant Navy Welfare Board to explore how the port could support the global drive to establish welfare boards in accordance with the requirements of the International Labour Organization (ILO).

“Welfare boards provide a platform for maritime organisations to meet regularly and support port welfare facilities in order to improve seafarers’ lives and services across the industry,” said Sharon Coveney, Deputy Chief Executive of the Merchant Navy Welfare Board (4th from left,above).

The proposal was welcomed by Port Manager Thami Sithole (5th left), who said: “The well-being of seafarers is in the best interest of every port user.”

Coveney added: “Thank you TNPA for your commitment to help improve seafarers’ welfare. The IPWP International Port Welfare Partnership Project team look forward to helping support the establishment of the Richards Bay Port Welfare Committee.”

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MOSSEL BAY PORT KEEN TO UNLOCK SMME BUSINESS OPPORTUNTIES

Lynne-Ann Prins of the TNPA Mossel Bay Procurement department engaging with representatives of local SMMEs at the Mossel Bay Municipality SMME Expo, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Lynne-Ann Prins of the TNPA Mossel Bay Procurement department engaging with representatives of local SMMEs at the Mossel Bay Municipality SMME Expo

Transnet National Ports Authority’s Port of Mossel Bay has again participated in the Mossel Bay Municipality’s annual SMME Expo on Friday, 31 May 2019, showcasing its services, unpacking its procurement processes and providing information on opportunities for SMME’s to conduct business with TNPA.

The Mossel Bay SMME Expo is held to foster the development of small and medium-sized enterprises. The port first participated in 2018 as part of its efforts to…

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NEW SURVEY CRAFT TO BOOST TRANSNET DREDGING FLEET

TNPA Dredging Services’ new survey craft, SS Sonar, featured in news report in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
TNPA Dredging Services’ new survey craft, SS Sonar

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) has taken delivery of a new survey craft which becomes the latest acquisition in its Dredging Services division’s ongoing R2 billion+ fleet replacement programme.

The vessel, valued at approximately R1.5 million, was built by a local company in Durban.

Carl Gabriel, Executive Manager for TNPA’s Dredging Services division, said the new vessel is replacing the South African port landlord’s existing survey craft, Swift, which is 32 years old and has reached the end of its operational life.

The new craft has been named SS Sonar.

“Although the survey craft is one of the smaller vessels in our dredging fleet, it is a critical tool for keeping our ports at the correct depths for safe navigation. We use the survey craft to conduct single beam hydrographic surveys around the ports as well as measuring the physical environment underwater for any potential impact on marine activities,” he said.

Gabriel said the TNPA dredging fleet plays a vital role in facilitating economic growth within the country by ensuring the ports’ entrance channels, basins and berths are well maintained.

“Critical to the success of dredging is the need for world-class dredging vessels, especially as we continue to welcome an influx of container vessels larger than 10,000 TEUs which has resulted in the demand for berth dredging increasing threefold,” he added.

Gabriel said it was inspiring to see new entrants into the boat building market.

close-up of the new craft SS SONAR in Durban hrbour, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
close-up of the new craft

The new vessel was designed, manufactured, assembled, commissioned and delivered to TNPA’s Dredging Services division by local company, Dams Maintenance and Industrial Supplies cc, on time and within budget.

The Black-owned family company based in Woodview, Durban, has a Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBBEE) Level 1 status and scooped the contract through a competitive tender process in which the contractor satisfied all technical, B-BBEE and price evaluation criteria. Dams sub-contracted certain elements to Hansen Boatz and Toyz cc – t/a Durban Yamaha.

Dams Operations Director, Danny Ramsaroop, said the company’s previous experience included building a Category E rescue craft for the KwaDukuza Municipality’s lifeguards division and a jet ski for the eThekwini Municipality’s lifeguards unit.

“This was our first project for Transnet and it was sheer pleasure but also hard work coordinating the project from documentation to the manufacture and delivery according to specifications, with all statutory certification,” he said.

The order was received from TNPA in November 2018 and the craft was completed five days ahead of schedule on 26 March 2019.

Creating an enabling environment for the growth of local ship building and ship repair is a key focus for the South African Government’s Operation Phakisa: Oceans Economy programme in which TNPA is a lead implementing agent.

Pictured with TNPA Dredging Services’ new survey craft SS Sonar are (left to right) Operations Director, Danny Ramsaroop, of contractor Dams Maintenance and Industrial Supplies; Trinesh Govender, Project Manager (Opex and Capex) at TNPA Dredging Services and Ryan Hansen of subcontractor Durban Yamaha, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Pictured with TNPA Dredging Services’ new survey craft SS Sonar are (left to right) Operations Director, Danny Ramsaroop, of contractor Dams Maintenance and Industrial Supplies; Trinesh Govender, Project Manager (Opex and Capex) at TNPA Dredging Services and Ryan Hansen of subcontractor Durban Yamaha

 

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HOW TO MAKE A CRIPPLING SOVEREIGN DEBT GO AWAY

Part of the Ematum fleet of over20 trawlers, featuring in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Part of the Ematum fleet of over20 trawlers

How do you make an unwanted and crippling debt go away? In Mozambique it’s done by declaring it illegal, and poof, the debt is null and void.

That at first sight is what appears to have been happened in Maputo this week with the Constitutional Council making the ruling “The constitutional council declares the nullity of the acts inherent to the loan contracted by Ematum SA, and the respective sovereign guarantee granted by the government in 2013, with all legal consequences”.

In fact though, the matter is a lot more complex.

All three loans totalling over US$2 billion that have been strangling Mozambique are now presumably supposed to disappear. Nearly half of that amount was for the infamous…

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NOT GOOD NEWS AS SOUTH AFRICAN ECONOMY CONTRACTS 3.2 PERCENT

Kota Bagus departing from Durban. Picture: Keith Betts, featured inAfrica PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Kota Bagus departing from Durban.     Picture: Keith Betts

South Africa’s Statistician General Risenga Maluleke says the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) contracted by 3.2% in the first quarter of 2019.

Speaking at the release of the GDP results for the first quarter of 2019, Maluleke yesterday (Tuesday) that this was largely due to the mining and quarrying and manufacturing industries being negative contributors to growth quarter-on-quarter.

The manufacturing industry decreased by 8.8% and contributed -1.1 percentage points to the GDP.

Seven of the 10 manufacturing divisions reported negative growth rates in the first quarter. The divisions that made the largest contributions to the decrease were petroleum, chemical products, rubber, plastic products, motor vehicles, parts and accessories, as well as other transport equipment, wood products, publishing and printing.

Maluleke said the mining and quarrying industry contracted by 10.8% and contributed -0.8 of a percentage point to GDP growth.

The agriculture, forestry and fishing industry contracted by 13.2% and contributed -0.3 of a percentage point to GDP growth.

The decrease was mainly because of a drop in the production of field crops and horticultural products.

The finance, real estate and business services industries increased by 1.1% in the first quarter. An increase in economic activity was reported in the financial intermediation, real estate activities and business services.

General government services increased by 1.2% and this was mainly attributed to an increase in employment.

Personal services increased by 1.1%. source: SAnews.gov.za

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DURBAN CONTAINER TERMINAL BERTH DEEPENING CONTRACT FORMALLY CANCELLED

DCT's North Quay - no deepening and lengthening just yet! Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
DCT’s North Quay – no deepening and lengthening just yet!

The contract issued to the CMI Entateni Joint Venture in July 2018 to deepen, widen and lengthen the North Quay (berths 203, 204 & 205) at the Durban Container Terminal, has been formally cancelled.

Readers may recall that contractors had moved onto site and work was just commencing in October last year when Transnet responded to an unsolicited report from “Forensics for Justice”, with allegations of procurement irregularities on the project.

Transnet issued a Project Manager Instruction to the contractor…

Larger container ships designed to carry up to 12,000 or 14,000 TEU capacity containers are frequenting the port of Durban, but are forced to arrive or leave with less than full cargoes because of a lack of deepwater berths at the container terminal. This picture of MSC Domitille is by Trevor Jones, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Larger container ships designed to carry up to 12,000 or 14,000 TEU capacity containers are frequenting the port of Durban, but are forced to arrive or leave with less than full cargoes because of a lack of deepwater berths at the container terminal. MSC Donitille is relatively small at 9,400 TEU but is also unable to operate  to Durban while fully loaded. This picture of MSC Domitille  arriving at the port is by Trevor Jones

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DNV GL RELEASES UPDATE TO BULK CARGO LIQUEFACTION GUIDELINE

DNV GL releases updated version of its bulk cargo liquefactios report, feature in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Classification society DNV GL has released an updated version of its bulk cargo liquefaction guideline at the Nor-Shipping trade fair that is being held this week.

The guideline covers both the design and operation of vessels with bulk cargoes that may liquefy, and has already contributed to raise the awareness of the risks of cargo liquefaction on ships.

The first version of the guideline was issued in October 2015. The revision takes into account feedback from many readers and new practical experience gained over the past several years. Material has been added to help better describe precautions to be taken during voyages, or if cargo liquefaction is detected. In addition, some sections have been updated to include the latest developments, including DNV GL’s new class notation BCLIQ.

“Cargo liquefaction is the number one safety issue for bulk carriers,” says Morten Løvstad, Global Business Director of Bulk Carriers at DNV GL.

“In the last 10 years, over 100 seafarers have lost their lives as a result of liquefaction, which shows that…

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PORT OF DURBAN IS AFRICA’S LEADING CRUISE PORT AT WORLD TRAVEL AWARDS

The Port of Durban, winner of the World Travel Awards “Africa’s Leading Cruise Port” title again in 2019, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The Port of Durban, winner of the World Travel Awards “Africa’s Leading Cruise Port” title again in 2019

The Port of Durban, operated by TNPA (Transnet National Ports Authority), has scooped the prestigious title of Africa’s Leading Cruise Port at the World Travel Awards for the second year running.

The Africa & Indian Ocean gala awards ceremony took place at Sugar Beach, Mauritius on Saturday, 1 June 2019, where Durban won in three categories – Leading City Destination, Leading Meetings and Conference Destination and Leading Cruise Port.

This year’s awards once again saw the port up against strong contenders including Kenya’s Port of Mombasa, Tanzania’s Ports of Dar Es Salaam and Zanzibar, as well as South Africa’s Ports of Cape Town and Port Elizabeth.

The Port of Durban previously held the title from 2010 to 2013 before losing it to Cape Town in 2014 and then to Mombasa from 2015 to 2017.

“We’re thrilled to have retained this respected title and we must thank South Africans for so eagerly making cruise voyages a part of their lifestyle,” said Acting Durban Port Manager, Nokuzola Nkowane (pictured).

Acting port manager Nokuzola Nkowane, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Acting port manager Nokuzola Nkowane

“Our thanks also go the cruise line operators that continue to show such confidence in our port by including it on their itineraries, often with multiple vessels calling to our sunny shores.

“Finally, we express our gratitude to all the players in the local tourism sector who offer shore excursions and cultural experiences to make the city of Durban such an attractive tourism destination, ensuring our continued appeal to domestic and international tourists alike.”

The Port of Durban’s 2018/19 cruise season show passenger figures as having increased by 29.4% over the previous year, according to TNPA’s recently released data.

TNPA processed 255,422 passenger embarkations and disembarkations at the Durban port, up from the 197,382 recorded in 2017/18. The port enjoyed 63 calls by 16 different cruise vessels.

To develop the port’s cruise sector facilities even further, the KwaZulu Cruise Terminal (KCT) consortium was awarded a 25-year concession to develop a new cruise terminal and is presently finalising the detailed design ahead of an anticipated commissioning date of 2020.

Durban is presently used as a home port by MSC Cruises, which will introduce its MSC ORCHESTRA vessel on the route in the 2019/20 season, following success with MSC SINFONIA and MSC MUSICA over the last few years.

 

Silver Spirit sailing from Durban, pictured by Trevor Jones and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Silver Spirit sailing from Durban, pictured by Trevor Jones

Nkowane also congratulated Silversea Cruises, which was named Africa’s Leading Cruise Line 2019.

Headquartered in Monaco, the company has become a regular to local cruise ports, usually with two or three vessels sailing locally per cruise season, including Silver Discoverer, Silver Whisper, Silver Spirit and Silver Cloud.

Founded in 1993, the World Travel Awards seek to acknowledge, reward and celebrate excellence across all sectors of the global travel and tourism industry.

South African entities scooped more than 25 categories at the awards ceremony including:

* Africa’s Leading Festival & Event Destination 2019 – Cape Town
* Africa’s Leading Airport 2019 – Cape Town International Airport
* Africa’s Leading Casino Resort 2019 – Sun City
* Africa’s Leading Tourist Attraction 2019 – Table Mountain, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Sports Resort 2019 – Legend Golf & Safari Resort, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Boutique Hotel 2019 – Saxon Hotel, Villas and Spa, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading City Hotel 2019 – Pepperclub Hotel & Spa, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Cruise Line 2019 – Silversea Cruises
* Africa’s Leading Cruise Port 2019 Port of Durban, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Design Hotel 2019 – MannaBay, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Hotel Brand 2019 – Hilton Hotels & Resorts
* Africa’s Leading Hotel Suite 2019 – Nelson Mandela Platinum Suite @ Saxon Hotel, Villas and Spa, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Inflight Magazine 2019 – Sawubona (South African Airways)
* Africa’s Leading Luxury Hotel 2019 – The Twelve Apostles Hotel & Spa, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Luxury Hotel Villa 2019 – Villa Two @ Ellerman House, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Luxury Lodge 2019 – Silvan Safari, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Luxury Private Villa 2019 – Villa iZulu @ Thanda Safari, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Luxury Train 2019 – The Blue Train
* Africa’s Leading Meetings & Conference Destination 2019 – Durban, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading MICE Hotel 2019 – The Westin Cape Town, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Private Game Reserve 2019 – Shambala Private Game Reserve, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Resort 2019 – Sun City Resort, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Safari Lodge 2019 – Thanda Safari Lodge at Thanda Safari, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Serviced Apartments 2019 – Lawhill Luxury Apartments, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Sports Resort 2019 – Legend Golf & Safari Resort, South Africa
* Africa’s Leading Travel Agency 2019 – Club Travel, South Africa

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 DETAILS OF NEW MAPUTO-INHACA FERRY NAMED KANYAKA

New Maputo-Inhaca ferry Kanyaka. Picture: Radion Mocambique, featured in report in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Picture: Radio Mocambique

The new ferry between Mozambique’s capital city Maputo and the island of Inhaca out in Maputo (Delagoa) Bay which was inaugurated a week ago, cost US$2.7 million to acquire, according to a report in AIM.

Named KANYAKA which is the local name for the island, the ferry is capable of carrying 156 passengers and five tons of cargo, but oddly just a single vehicle.

Built in 2008, the ferry was acquired from Greece and has a top speed of 14 knots.

The report says the journey now takes…

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INTERTANKO/OCIMF MARITIME SECURITY UPDATE ON FUJAIRAH ATTACKS

INDIAN OCEAN BMP 5, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

The incidents against tankers at anchor off the Port of Fujairah, United Arab Emirates (UAE) on 12 May have been widely reported, (including here in Africa PORTS & SHIPS – see HERE.)

While damage was caused to vessels, INTERTANKO* and OCIMF** are relieved that no seafarers were injured or pollution detected.

In a statement issued on 30 May by the two organisations the current situation was portrayed: “We appreciate the support that the UAE and Fujairah Port Authority have given to those affected by these incidents.”

What is known by INTERTANKO and OCIMF

Four tankers were struck in Fujairah. The attack appears to have been well-planned and coordinated. It appears that each vessel was attacked by a sub-surface explosive device placed by either a remotely-operated vessel or diver. Both types of delivery method are more likely to happen when vessels are near stationary or in a very restricted waterway.

While Waterborne Improvised Explosive Devices (WBIED) have been used…

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MSC OPERA’S COLLISION IN VENICE LEADS TO RENEWED CALLS FOR BAN ON CRUISE SHIPS

A 0:45 video clip showing how the cruise ship MSC OPERA, which is a familiar vessel to South Africans, collided with the quay in the Giudecca canal and hitting and damaging another large river cruise vessel in Venice, Italy.

YouTube view of the accident from two different angles. Dramatic sound effects. [2:38]

The incident on Sunday morning this week saw five people injured on the river cruise vessel River Countess which took the brunt of the collision. MSC Opera suffered slight damage to her hull.

It appears that two tugs were connected to the 65,590-gt cruise ship when a mechanical malfunction occurred, with MSC Opera ploughing into the quay and the large river cruise ship tethered on the quay.

Although the tugs attempted to stop the ship’s momentum the engines had apparently locked. The anchor was dropped to little or no avail and the cables connecting with the tugs snapped from the strain as the cruise ship ploughed forward with horn sounding before grinding against the quay for a good 30 seconds before finally coming to a halt, as people of the quayside tried to scatter although a fence made things difficult. People could be heard crying in shock at what was transpiring right in front of them.

MSC Opera is a sister vessel to MSC Sinfonia which homeported in Durban over a number of years until recently. At one stage MSC Opera joined Sinfonia to jointly cruise in South African waters and again during the period when Sinfonia underwent her lengthening, Opera handled the summer cruise season in her place.

This is not the first time the MSC ship has been involved in collisions and other drama. In 2011 while cruising in the Baltic the Opera lost engine power to her engines leading to sanitation problems. With the ship having been towed to port the passengers were flown home and refunded for their inconvenience.

In 2013 MSC Opera was again in Venice when the ship rotated, almost colliding with the quayside on that occasion. The video clip immediately below illustrates this.

A third video clip below shows Sunday’s accident in more detail [9:44].

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WHITE PAPER FROM RIVERTRACE ON SCRUBBER & WASHWATER TECHNOLOGY

Rivertrace hull-cleaning system, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Ahead of the incoming Global Sulphur Cap restrictions that will impose a ban on all marine fuels with over 0.50% sulphur content from 1 January 2020, market leading developers of smart water quality monitoring technology Rivertrace Limited, have published a technical white paper that focusses on scrubber technology options and washwater monitoring.

Entitled To Scrub or not to scrub?, the white paper provides the industry with a need-to-know guide to all options for compliance, with particular focus on scrubbers and IMO washwater monitoring guidelines. The paper also explores the impact of sulphur emissions from ships, the chemistry of scrubbing sulphur from exhaust gases and the benefits associated with scrubber use.

As the global shipping industry prepares for the arrival of the global sulphur cap in January 2020, the choice between compliance options to meet fuel sulphur content restrictions imposed…

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GANGS OPERATING ALONG THE N-3 FROM DURBAN PETROL-BOMB MORE TRUCKS

The N-3 highway between the port of Durban and Gauteng was blocked at the Mariannhill toll last night by truck drivers demanding that the government and authorities step in with action to prevent further petrol bombing of trucks operating along the road.

This followed another 15 trucks that have been destroyed at the weekend by highwaymen who claim they are taking action against “foreign drivers”. The trucks were stopped and burned by gangs at several points on what is arguably South Africa’s most important economic route with trucks servicing the port of Durban and the economic heartland that is Gauteng. This stretched from Durban itself to near Sasolburg and Vereeniging.

Fleet owners and drivers are angry at a lack of meaningful response by the authorities, hence the blockade of the highway on Sunday night. Calls have meanwhile gone out telling the public to avoid driving the route at night for fear of being caught up in the gangster-driven thuggery.

Angry fleetowners say the authorities appears incapable, or disinterested in taking strong action to prevent these attacks on trucks on the pretext of them being operated by foreigners. They say that when police respond it is always too late, as the gangs that stop the vehicles before petrol-bombing the trucks have long since gone.

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AS AfCFTA COMES INTO EFFECT, QUESTIONS REMAIN ABOUT ITS ABILITY TO BRING CHANGE

Africa map as AfCFTA issigned into effect, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Will Africa become a victim of what is a mounting trade war between the United States and China?

The consensus seems to be that few nations will escape the effects of this dispute between the world’s two top economies but for Africa there is, in the eyes of some observers, a good chance that Africa can avoid the worst of events thanks to the signing last Thursday (30 May) of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) agreement, bringing this into effect.

To ratify AfCFTA needed the signatures of 22 African Union countries, which was achieved more than a month ago. As soon as all 55 AU nations have signed AfCFTA will become, with a market cover of 1.2 billion people and a combined GDP of US$2.5 trillion, the world’s largest free-trade area.

What are the potential benefits of this? One is certainly the ability of African countries to commence trading among themselves and in the process developing their own manufacturing and food-production capabilities instead of relying heavily on off-continent imports.

Intra-regional trade remains absurdly small and will require the building of better roads and railway networks linking all nations together and individual countries with their local communities. Part of this is already happening, for example the railway development going on in East and parts of West Africa, while South Africa already boasts the continents largest stretch of railways and roads both internally and into neighbouring states.

It will also mean the improvement of ports and coastal shipping – the former is also already in progress with a significant number of ports undergoing upgrading and rehabilitation and with several new ports under construction.

According to the African Export-Import Bank intra-African trade currently stands at a paltry 15%, compared with 58% in Asia but the good news is that intra-African trade can increase by 52% by 2022 and more than double within the next decade, the African bank reported in 2018.

Whilst this prognosis is positive, critics say that barriers in a number of Africa countries, evident at ports and on the road networks, make this unlikely to succeed given the existing approaches of certain African governments.

They point to overbearing bureaucracy and red tape that hinders trade and makes any approach at improving intra-African trade in particular more unlikely to succeed. Tariffs on over 90% of cargo being imported will have to be removed, they say, while cautioning that too many governments rely far too heavily on these levies for revenue to survive.

Nevertheless there is a degree of optimism surrounding the effects of the AfCFTA having come into effect, and this is highlighted even further with suggestions that Nigeria, which has the biggest economy in Africa, is about to sign up after delaying its decision to do so.

Africa’s ministers of trade are scheduled to meet in Kampala, capital of Uganda, this week to review work on these supporting instruments ahead of the Extra-Ordinary Summit on the AfCFTA, according to the AU.

The AU also says that the continental free trade pact paves the way for accelerating the establishment of the Continental Customs Union and the African customs union. The matter now rests with the politicians.

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SOUTH AFRICA READIES FOR IMO 2020 SHIP EMISSION LAWS

SAMSA to meet maritime transport stakeholders in an indaba in July 2019

ship emissions highligted in article in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

South Africa will be ready to implement new global regulations governing the prevention of air pollution by ships at sea, in terms of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) MARPOL Convention (Annexture VI), according to the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA).

In a statement on Thursday addressed to maritime sector and related stakeholders (Click on video below) SAMSA, a state agency under the Department of Transport, responsible for among other things the safety of life and property at sea, as well as prevention of pollution at sea by ships, said it was confident that South Africa would both be able to offer ships the required new low sulphur fuel in terms of the Marpol Convention (Annex 6), as well as render such other services as necessary under the new regulations.

Revised regulations for the prevention of air pollution from ships under the MARPOL (Annexture 6) were adopted in October 2008 and ratified by more than 65 countries including South Africa.

In terms of this, a ll sizes of ships sailing on the world’s oceans will need to use fuel oil that meets the 0.50% limit from 1 January 2020. The 0.50% sulphur limit extends to carriage of bunker fuel with sulphur content of more than 0.50% for vessels not fitted with Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems (EGSC). The carriage ban will come into effect on 1 March 2020.

According to SAMSA, ships must operate using compliant fuels of 0.50% sulphur or less from 1 January 2020 unless they are provided with an approved ‘equivalent’ means of compliance.

As part of its preparation for the coming into effect of the regulations next January, SAMSA has issued at least two Marine Notices (Marine Notice No.8 of 2019 and Marine Notice No.9 of 2019) to industry, and is due to issue another in the next month or so.

SAMSA’s statement on Thursday followed the organisation’s most recent meeting with the IMO Maritime Environmental Protection Committee (MEPC) in London two weeks ago.

SAMSA acting CEO Mr Sobatu Tilayi, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

SAMSA acting Chief Executive Officer, Mr Sobantu Tilayi (pictured) said introduction of the MARPOL Convention regulation on low sulphur ships fuel scheduled for implementation from 01 January 2020 would go ahead as planned.

“It’s all systems go as far as that is concerned and it’s a big piece of legislation with far reaching consequences. What we now need to do as a country is to put in place the regulations necessary to effect the process from January 2020.”

As part of the preparation, Mr Tilayi said SAMSA would arrange a maritime transport sector meeting of directly affected stakeholders as well as government departments or agencies responsible for environmental and energy matters.

“The reason is that we still have a number of issues that remain a major challenge and which we collectively need to look into and come up with solutions for. Therefore we, as SAMSA, are proposing a gathering of all stakeholders in the second week of July 2019 or thereabouts, in which we will sit around the table and thrash these issues out,” he said.

Among the issues for sector discussion and resolution were matters relating to the proper handling of ships coming into South African ports without the compliant fuel, the availability of facilities to test fuels in use by ships, the handling of vessels using non compliant fuel but fitted with sulphur reducing equipment etc.

The proposed maritime transport sector indaba for July 2019, he said, would allow all interested and affected parties an opportunity to come up with solutions that would assist in the finalization of local regulations for the implementation of the IMO Marpol Convention on use of low sulphur fuels.

Video with Mr Sobantu Tilayi, acting CEO of SAMSA [14:17]

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NSRI STATION 5 DURBAN LATEST SEA RESCUE BOAT ALICK RENNIE COMMISSIONED

Alick Rennie being put through her paces in Cape Town shortly after arriving by ship from France. Picture: NSRI, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Alick Rennie being put through her paces in Cape Town shortly after arriving by ship from France. Picture: NSRI

The National Sea Rescue Institute on Friday, 31 May commissioned into service their latest new sea rescue vessel, the ORC 140 craft that has been named ALICK RENNIE.

The commissioning took place where the new rescue craft will be stationed, at the Station 5 sea rescue base in Durban.

The commissioning took place before more than 200 donors, supporters affiliated emergency services and NSRI crew at the Durban NSRI station which is on the Point, close to the harbour entrance.

Details of the new boat can be found in our earlier report BIG WELCOME FOR NSRI’S NEW GENERATION SEARCH & RESCUE VESSEL

On Friday Mark Hughes, Operations Director shared details…

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TUNISIA JOINS THE INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT FORUM (ITF)

News from the 2019 summit 22-24 May, Leipzig, Germany

IOTF Forum meeting in Leipzig May 2019, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Tunisia has joined the International Transport Forum (ITF) as the organisation’s 60th member. This was reported shortly after Ministers of Transport from the 59 current member states agreed unanimously to admit the North African nation to the organisation at their Annual Summit in Leipzig, Germany, on 23 May.

Tunisia is the organisation’s second member state on the African continent, Morocco was the first. See https://www.itf-oecd.org/member-countries

The ITF is the only intergovernmental organisation with a global mandate for all transport modes. Housed by the OECD in Paris the ITF acts as a centre for policy studies into transport and organises a global summit of ministers of transport each year.

"Tunisia’s accession is a proud day for the International Transport Forum," said ITF Secretary-General Young Tae Kim, pictured left with Tunisia’s Minister of Transport, Hichem Ben Ahmed (centre) and Republic of Korea’s Vice Minister Jeong Ryeol Kim, pictured right, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
“Tunisia’s accession is a proud day for the International Transport Forum,” said ITF Secretary-General Young Tae Kim, pictured left with Tunisia’s Minister of Transport, Hichem Ben Ahmed (centre) and Republic of Korea’s Vice Minister Jeong Ryeol Kim, pictured right

From 21 to 24 May the ITF’s 2019 Summit took place in Leipzig with the participation of around 40 ministers with responsibility for transport and more than 1100 delegates.

In the words of Hichem Ben Ahmed, Tunisia’s Minister of Transport: “Today, Tunisia marks a remarkable occasion – its accession to the International Transport Forum. The Forum provides the appropriate framework for dialogue and co-ordination between key transport stakeholders towards a common vision for better transport and logistics performance.

“A strategic geographical position at…

Session summaries and images gathered over the three day event are available: CLICK HERE

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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DURBAN PORT WELFARE COMMITTEE ESTABLISHED

Image courtesy ISWAN
Image courtesy: ISWAN

At an event organised in Durban this week, a Port Welfare Committee was established with the support of all the existing port chaplaincies and seafarer missions in the port, as well as other stakeholders from the port, city and provincial authorities.

The aim of the committee is to develop a more collaborative and holistic approach when providing assistance and support to the tens of thousands of seafarers that visit Durban each year.

The Port of Durban is already well-cared for by the ecumenical Durban Seafarers Mission, operating from the Durban Seafarers Centre at Bayhead near the container terminal. In addition this role is supported by organisations such as the Apostleship of the Sea, Biblia, Christian Seaman’s Organisation, German Seamens Mission, Sailors Society and Mission to Seafarers.

Apart from ship visits by the chaplains and ship visitors, seafarers are provided with fellowship, practical and spiritual support, including hospital visits to seafarers who find themselves hospitalised in a strange city and environment and far from home. Other support comes by way of providing transport, shopping opportunities, access at the Seafarers Centre to the internet and communications with home, and spiritual support where requested.

So why another organisation with some sort of overriding activity to all that is already available at the port of Durban, as well as several other South African ports?

According to the Port Welfare Committee website CLICK HERE the ISWAN project (International Seafarers’ Welfare and Assistance Network) has as its main aim to work with representatives of appropriate international maritime organisations, governments, ship owners, maritime unions, port owners/authorities and voluntary organisations.

The purpose is to establish and support Welfare Boards, in accordance with MLC, 2006 4.4,* in at least five different countries whilst simultaneously seeking support for a larger international Welfare Boards development programme.

* The Maritime Labour Convention (MLC), 2006 otherwise known as the ‘seafarers’ bill of rights’ builds on sixty eight existing maritime labour conventions and recommendations, as well as more general fundamental principles, to ensure decent working and living conditions for all seafarers. Some important conventions not included are those relating to seafarers’ identity documents (ILO 108 & 105) and pensions (ILO 71).

The MLC is designed to sit alongside regulation such as the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) standards on ship safety, security and quality ship management (such as SOLAS, STCW and MARPOL.)

Where they deal more with the vessel and its operation, the MLC deals more with seafarers’ rights. It should be remembered that MLC, 2006 sets out minimum requirements: many flag states that ratify the Convention may have higher standards. States may not reduce existing rights when they ratify a new convention. The International Labour Convention, Maritime Labour Convention 2006 (MLC, 2006) came into force on 20th August 2013.

Getting back to the Port Welfare Committee that gathered in Durban on Wednesday 29 May, this is part of a programme funded by the seafarers International Transport Workers’ Federation Seafarers’ Trust (ITFST), Merchant Navy Welfare Board (MNWB), TK Foundation and Seafarers UK.

It aims to encourage and support the establishment of welfare boards worldwide, in accordance with ILO MLC, 2006, hence the Durban meeting. Welfare Boards provide the forum for maritime organisations to regularly meet and support seafarers’ port welfare services/facilities in order to improve seafarers’ lives and services to shipping worldwide.

The newly formed Durban Port Welfare Committee (DPWC – yet another acronym to remember) seeks to supplement and build on the excellent service already provided by the volunteer organisations already mentioned, and will establish a forum where the work of all marine organisations with a vested interest in seafarers’ welfare can be coordinated.

image courtesy: ISWAN
image courtesy: ISWAN

The DPWC will therefore bring together key representatives from the port, maritime community, local and provincial government and non-profit organisations to support and improve seafarers’ welfare facilities and services both in Durban and Richards Bay and where possible become influential at the other ports.

Strong assurances of support from the city of Durban came from the deputy mayor of eThekwini Municipality, Councillor Fawzia Peer, as well as those representing various organisations present. Included among these were representatives from the ports of Mombasa, Dar es Salaam and Walvis Bay.

Key representative attending the event from the UK was the IPWP Project Manager and MNWB Deputy Chief Executive, Ms Sharon Coveney.

“The men and women who live and work at sea are often away from their families and friends for many months, working long hours at demanding jobs, landing at foreign countries for only short periods of time,” she said.

“We are delighted that Durban as a major Southern African port has participated in this programme. A content, fit and healthy seafarer is a safer and more productive seafarer.”

Peter Cottrell, chairman of the Durban Seafarers Mission said that although there was much work being done for the welfare of seafarers in the port of Durban, “this initiative offers us a unique opportunity to formalise relationships and to establish a collaborative platform to better serve the 60,000 or so seafarers who visit our port each year.”

The DPWC promises to be of great value to the port, the maritime industry and the country, and will complement the Comprehensive Maritime Transport Policy of South Africa.

As the first port in South Africa to form a Port Welfare Committee, Durban will be leading the way as part of this global initiative to improve the overall well-being of seafarers under the auspices of the ILO Maritime Labour Convention, 2006, to which South Africa is a signatory.

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THE PIANC YEARBOOK 2018 IS NOW AVAILABLE

It has been reported that the PIANC Yearbook 2018 was released on 28 May. A copy may be downloaded at no charge here: https://www.pianc.org/pianc-yearbook

PIANC Yearbook 2018 which is featued in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

In this fine digital version readers will be able to appreciate the Contents here:

* Message by the President

* Report on the PIANC HQ Activities 2018 by Geert Van Cappellen, Secretary-General

* Publications issued in 2018

* News from National Sections and Members of PIANC

* Technical articles from Japan, the host country of the Annual General Assembly

* Details from PIANC’s Sister Associations viz, the International Association of Ports and Harbors (IAPH); the International Council of Marine Industry Associations (ICOMIA);the International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation and Lighthouse Authorities (IALA); the International Harbour Masters’ Association (IHMA); the International Association of Dredging Companies (IADC); the Association of Mediterranean Cruise Ports and the Associations of Marina Industries.

The editor of the PIANC Yearbook 2018 is Geert Van Cappellen
Secretary-General of PIANC at HQ: Boulevard du Roi Albert II 20
B 3 1000 Brussels – Belgium

The publication carries ISBN 978 2 87223 260 4
European Article Number (EAN) 9782872232604

PIANC Carbon Guide published 2019 and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

About PIANC: The World Association for Waterborne Transport Infrastructure

Established in 1885, PIANC continues to be the leading partner for government and private sector in the design, development and maintenance of ports, waterways and coastal areas. As a non-political and non-profit organisation, PIANC brings together the best international experts on technical, economic and environmental issues pertaining to waterborne transport infrastructure.

PIANC is renowned for its outstanding and high-quality technical reports on ports and waterborne transport infrastructure.

PIANC’s mission is to provide expert guidance, recommendations and technical advice, to keep the international waterborne transport community connected, and to support Young Professionals and Countries in Transition. Members include representatives of public authorities, corporations and interested individuals.

Membership

PIANC Membership is worldwide and open to everyone. PIANC has members in 65 countries, including 40 Qualifying Members, about 450 Corporate Members (consultants, contractors, manufacturing companies, port agencies, etc.) and about 2000 Individual Members.

Twenty-seven National Sections are recognised and operate to facilitate contacts between PIANC HQ and the local membership. Moreover, eight Platinum Partners are giving strong support to PIANC (DEME, Jan De Nul, Port of Rotterdam, Van Oord, Trelleborg, Toa Corporation, Shibata Fender Team and Boskalis).

In South Africa, a Qualifying Member as the First Delegate is Dorian Bilse of the National Ports Authority of South Africa (PO Box 32696, Braamfontein 2017; E-mail: dorian.bilse@transnet.net )

Elsewhere in Africa PIANC is represented in Morocco by Agence National des Ports based in Casablanca.

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

Excerpt from a PIANC document on Carebon Management published in 2019 by PIANC and featuredin Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

 

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NEW INHACA ISLAND FERRY ENTERS SERVICE AT MAPUTO

New Inhaca Island ferry Kanyaka which has entered service between Maputo and Inhaca Island, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
New Inhaca Island ferry Kanyaka which has entered service between Maputo and Inhaca Island.   Picture:  Radio Mocambique

Mozambique’s President Filipe Nyusi has inaugurated a new ferry for the Maputo harbour – Inhaca Island service.

The ferry will operate from the port to Inhaca Island, which lies opposite the city of Maputo at a distance of about 25 miles and which relies on boating services for a passenger and cargo service. If in a hurry one can fly from Maputo International Airport.

The previous government ferry, Nyeleti which was slow and unreliable, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The previous government ferry, Nyeleti which was slow and unreliable

The previous government ferry was elderly and increasingly unreliable when in 2016 the government advised that another more modern vessel would be acquired. The earlier boat, a 1972-built vessel named NYELETI, took about four ours to make the journey to Inhaca and would frequently be not available.

Another older ferry in service at Maputo and operating to Inhaca is a converted naval type landing craft.

The new ferry, named KANYAKA after the kaNyaka municipal district, was delivered last week.

The ferry which can carry passengers and some cargo, was acquired by the Mozambique government to solve the problem of travel between the city and the island by guaranteeing a maritime connection, will make daily trips in accordance with demand.

Map of Inhaca Island location, featuring in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

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PORTOF DURBAN CRUISE PROSPECTS PROMISING

MSC Musica at Durban, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

The Port of Durban’s 2018/19 cruise season figures paint a promising picture for the future of the local cruise sector, with passenger figures up by 29.4% over the previous year, according to data released by Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA).

TNPA processed 255,422 passenger embarkations and disembarkations at the port, up from the 197,382 recorded in 2017/18. During the cruise season, which typically runs from late October to late April, the port enjoyed 63 calls by 16 different cruise vessels.

“Our growth is largely due to MSC Cruises, which uses the Port of Durban as a home port,” said Acting Port Manager, Nokuzola Nkowane. “MSC Cruises had the…

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MOSSEL BAY GIRLS EXPLORE THE PORT

Grade 9, 10 and 11 girls from Groot-Brakrivier Secondary School at the Port of Mossel Bay, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Grade 9, 10 and 11 girls from Groot-Brakrivier Secondary School at the Port of Mossel Bay

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA)’s Port of Mossel Bay hosted an early observation of Take a Girl Child to Work Day on Friday, 24 May 2019, welcoming 30 grade 9, 10 and 11 girls from Groot-Brakrivier Secondary School.

The girls gained insight into the operations of the port and the wide range of career opportunities offered.

Commenting on behalf of the school, principal Ms AF Muller said the girls were excited and stimulated by the exposure to the world of maritime opportunities. “The words of encouragement from department representatives really boosted our learners’ confidence and helped them re-evaluate their career prospects. We want to thank TNPA for the excellent organisation of the event.”

This year the rest of the country will observe the Cell C ‘Take a Girl Child to Work Day’ on 30 May, 26 July and 30 August. TNPA has supported the Take a Girl Child to Work Initiative since inception and has seen the number of participants growing steadily over the past 15 years.

Through various TNPA programmes aimed at promoting gender equality and women’s development, women are increasingly taking up key operational roles traditionally filled by men, such as dredge masters, tug masters and pilots, as well as senior leadership roles.

Grade 9, 10 and 11 girls from Groot-Brakrivier Secondary School at the Port of Mossel Bay, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

To participate in TNPA’s programme for the day girls must be in grades 9 to 12 and studying English, Pure Mathematics and Physical Science at high school level, as these are required for many of the mission critical roles in the maritime industry.

However, to make the programme more inclusive and because it recognises that the Marine and working world requires a multi-disciplined workforce, the port exposes learners to various disciplines including Finance, Operations, Marine, Continuous Improvement, Corporate Communication, and Engineering related careers.

After an overview of the port system, the learners spent the day “shadowing” senior staff as they went about their day and were exposed to various aspects of port operations.

TNPA’s head office and seven other ports are preparing to host their ‘Take a Girl Child to Work Day’ programmes in the coming days and weeks.

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ENI ACQUIRES RIGHTS IN THREE NEW EXPLORATION LICENSES IN MOZAMBIQUE

Eni exploration blocks off Mozambique, map courtesy: Eni, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
map courtesy: Eni

ItaIian oil major Eni, through its subsidiary Eni Mozambico, has acquired rights to explore and develop offshore blocks A5-B, Z5-C and Z5-D, located in the deep waters of Angoche and Zambezi Basins.

Through a farm-in agreement, signed with ExxonMobil Moçambique Exploration & Production Limitada (ExxonMobil) and authorised by Mozambican institutions, Eni acquires a 10% stake in the three blocks.

Block A5-B is located about 1,300 kilometres northeast of the capital Maputo, in a completely unexplored area off the town of Angoche. It has an area of 6,080 square kilometres, at a water depth of between 1,800 and 2,500 metres.

Blocks Z5-C and Z5-D cover a total area of 10,205 square kilometres, at a water depth between 500 and 2,100 metres, in a scarcely explored area facing the delta of the Zambezi River, about 800 kilometres to the north-east of the capital Maputo.

The three blocks, assigned under the…

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GHANAIAN NAVY PREPARES TO BE HOST TO OVER 10 CHIEFS OF NAVY & 250 INTERNATIONAL GUESTS

Sekondi Naval Base, Ghana, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Sekondi Naval Base, Ghana

A 2018 report by the International Maritime Bureau (IMB), issued about piracy and armed robbery against ships revealed that total of 201 incidents were reported in 2018. The report stated some other alarming figures, as the violence against crew from January till December 2018 varied between 141 incidents of crew taken hostage, 83 kidnapped, 9 threatened, 8 injured, and 2 killed.

As a consequence, the Ghanaian Navy will be hosting over 10 Chiefs of Navies from across Africa in addition to 250 international senior officials from Navies, Coast Guards and Marine Police at the International Maritime Defence Exhibition & Conference (IMDEC).

This is taking place on 24-25 July 2019 in Accra and will discuss and address how to secure the increasingly volatile marine and coastal waters in Africa as well as stabilising economic advancement and security in the crucial Gulf of Guinea.

Rear Admiral Seth Amoama, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Ghana’s Vice President Dr Mahamudu Bawumia and the Chief of Naval Staff Rear Admiral Seth Amoama will inaugurate the event.

Commenting on organising IMDEC, Rear Admiral Seth Amoama, Chief of Naval Staff, Ghana Navy, said: “The Ghana Navy celebrates the 60th Anniversary this year under the theme ‘Celebrating 60 years of Naval Excellence: Securing the Maritime Domain for National Development’. As part of activities to commemorate the occasion, we are in partnership with Great Minds Events Management to organise the International Maritime Defence Exhibition and Conference in Accra Ghana from 23-25 July 2019.

“I look forward to welcoming you to Accra as we are inviting all maritime stakeholders both local and international as well as chiefs of the navy’s sub- region and also from other international countries to come and discuss principle issues facing the maritime security of Africa and in particular the Gulf of Guinea.”

Admiral Amoama said that the conference will explore modern technical innovations that will aid in curbing the illegal unregulated, unreported fishing dominating the maritime domain.

“We look forward to a rich conversation on information sharing and capacity building. We will also talk about cyber and electronic warfare.

“In addition, participants and attendees have the opportunity to visit the stands and exhibitions put in place by major defence and maritime industry to showcase modern and advanced technology in maritime severance defence command and control and a whole lot of technology to be displayed during this conference.”

Ghanaian Naval ratings as featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Ghanaian Naval ratings

The latest report released by Ocean Beyond Piracy (OBP) showed that the economic cost of piracy to West Africa has been on the increase in the last three years, reaching over US$818.1 million in 2017, while about $213.7 million was spent to contract maritime security personnel protecting vessels in the region. It revealed that regional spending on law enforcement and naval patrols increased by $13.2 million in the year.

On Tuesday, 23 July 2019 an exclusive site visit to Sekondi Naval Base is planned where delegates will be airlifted from Accra to Sekondi port by the Ghana Air Force for an exclusive site visit of the Takoradi Naval Base.

The tour will consist of an in-depth walk through of the naval dockyard and base as well as a private sea tour to further display the advanced capabilities of Ghana’s Naval fleet.

Further details of this event can be found at https://imdecafrica.com/ or email to register@gmevents.ae

Among the VIPs who have confirmed their attendance are:

Dr Mahamudu Bawumia, Vice President of the Republic of Ghana
Lt Gen Obed Boamah Akwa, Chief of the Defence Staff, Ghana
Rear Admiral Seth Amoama, Chief of Naval Staff, Ghana Navy
Vice Admiral Ibok Ete Ibas, Chief of Naval Staff, Nigeria Navy
Major General Moundhey G Ali, Commander, Special Forces, Nigeria Army
Rear Admiral Koi Alexis Maomou, Chief of Staff, Guinea Navy
Rear Admiral Momar Diagne, Chief of Naval Staff, Senegal Navy
Captain Kossi Mayo, Chief of Staff, Togo Navy
Captain Albert Ezin Bado, Chief of Naval Staff, Benin Navy
Hon Dominic Nitiwul, MP Minister of Defence, Ghana
Major General William Ayamdo, Chief of Army Staff, Ghana
Air Vice Marshall Frank Hanson, Chief of Air Staff, Ghana
Admiral James Gordon Foggo III, Commander US Naval Forces, Europe and Africa

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GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

in partnership with – APO

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EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

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THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can’t try to do things. You simply must do things.” – Ray Bradbury
and
“Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, the just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while.” – Steve Jobs

 

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