Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news 13 May 2019

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002
Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

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TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

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FIRST VIEW 1: RHONE MAERSK

Rhone Maersk departing Durban. Picture: Ken Malcolm, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Rhone Maersk. Picture: Ken Malcolm

Maersk Line container ship RHONE MAERSK (IMO 9457000) makes her way towards the Durban port entrance channel and the high seas after loading containers at DCT. This was in March this year. Built in 2012, the 61,962-dwt Rhone Maersk is flagged in Denmark and managed from that country by Maersk Line A/S. The vessel is 249 metres in length and has a beam of 37m and operates on the West Africa, South Africa, Middle East, India sub-continent including Sri Lanka service. This picture is by Ken Malcolm

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TNPA BANS ALL DIVING AND FISHING IN DURBAN HARBOUR DUE TO SEWAGE

Nothing new - this was taken in July 2016 after heavy rains filled the Bayhead area with the rubbish of surrounding districts that washed into one of the rivers flowing into Durban Bay. Picture: Terry Flynn, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Nothing new – this was taken in July 2016 after heavy rains filled the Bayhead area with the rubbish of surrounding districts that washed into one of the rivers flowing into Durban Bay. Picture: Terry Flynn

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) has suspended all diving operations within the Port of Durban and is prohibiting all angling activities.

The reason is a severe sewage discharge that poses a risk to diving personnel and marine life.

The discharge stems from the failure of pumps at the eThekwini Municipality’s Mahatma Gandhi Pump station.

The municipality has taken the pumps out of commission and is currently awaiting the arrival of spare parts from overseas in order for repairs to be effected.

TNPA’s environmental department is engaging with the municipality and is appealing to port users for their cooperation as the City acts to repair the pumps.

In particular the suspension of diving will have an impact on companies using the repair quays within the port’s ship repair precinct.

The Port of Durban is unfortunately on the receiving end of the large volume of litter, effluent and sewage that is discharged via the storm-water reticulation system from a catchment area of over 200km2 in size.

Nothing new! This was the scene at Easter this year after heavy rains filled the harbour with rubbish that flowed into the bay from three rivers and countless drains that spill into sub-Saharan Africa's most important economic harbour. Picture: TNPA, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Nothing new! This was the scene at Easter this year after heavy rains filled the harbour with rubbish that flowed into the bay from three rivers and countless drains that spill into sub-Saharan Africa’s most important economic harbour. Picture: TNPA

Editorial Comment: Turning Durban Harbour into a Cesspool

The situation expressed in TNPA’s announcement carried above is serious enough and is yet another indictment on service delivery failure by a leading municipality in South Africa.

How is it that a city like Durban allows a situation where repairs to pumps at a vital sewer pump station is delayed because parts have to come from overseas. What happened to the principal that municipal stores should carry a stock of essential spares and more importantly, how regular was maintenance carried out at the pump station?

On the strength of numerous other examples in Durban and elsewhere in the country, it would be an easy bet that this factor was frequently neglected.

But the real question we ask as a maritime-related publication is how it is that untreated sewage can be expelled into the country’s leading harbour, presumably through overflowing municipal drains? We recently carried a report where TNPA stated it was in discussions with the city about the pollution that spills into the bay along municipal drains – over 50 of them it seems.

To our knowledge these discussions have been carrying on for years without any finality. Perhaps the matter needs to be taken now to a higher level and the municipality simply ordered to stop allowing its so-called stormwater drains to flow freely into the harbour and associated rivers.

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KNUD E. HANSEN DESIGNS NEW LNG-POWERED RoRo VESSELS FOR WALLENIUS-SOL

New LNG-powered RoRo vessels for Wallenius-SOL designed by KNUD E. HANSEN,featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

KNUD E. HANSEN has designed the first generation of LNG- powered ultra-large RoRo vessels for the newly- established Swedish company Wallenius-SOL.

Up to four vessels have been ordered at Yantai CIMC Raffles Offshore Ltd, China, for whom Knud E. Hansen will provide the engineering package for the construction and approval by classification and flag state authorities.

This is the 4th series of ultra-large RoRo vessels designed by Knud E. Hansen since 2016, resulting in…

New LNG-powered RoRo vessels for Wallenius-SOL designed by KNUD E. HANSEN and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
New LNG-powered RoRo vessels for Wallenius-SOL designed by KNUD E. HANSEN

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NEW UGANDAN LAKE VICTORIA FERRY NEARS COMPLETION AT JINJA

Lake Victoria showing location of Jinja wher the new ferry in under construction, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Lake Victoria showing location of Jinja where the new ferry in under construction

A new ferry on Lake Victoria is nearing completion at the Masesse landing site shipyard in Jinja in Uganda.

To be named MV SIGULU, the ferry was ordered by the Ugandan government in order to provide a lake service for the Lolwe and Sigulu sub-counties in Namayingo District.

According to he Uganda National Roads Authority (UNRA), construction of MV Sigulu has reached the 95% stage.

UNRA executive director Ms Allen Catherine Kagina inspected the progress of the ferry this week to satisfy herself that the construction was going according to schedule.

Construction of MV Sigulu began in September 2018 by the Danish form that was awarded the contract, JGH Marine A/S.

JGH Marine has a solid track record in East Africa and has built Alu Patrol Boats for Tanzania, a RoRo ferry and a dredger for Uganda and an Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) for Kenya, as well as a number of tourist boats that operate on Lake Victoria.

The media relations manager for UNRA, Allan Sempebwa said the ferry would become one of the largest to operate on the lake, with a capacity of 300 people.

A delegation of residents from the Namayingo District, who also went on a site tour of the ferry’s construction said they welcomed its progress because they had been forced to endure a poor and even lack of service delivery for a long period of time.

After visiting the shipyard site Ms Kagina and a team of technical staff began a four-day inspection of road projects in eastern Uganda.

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KONECRANES TO EQUIP TEMA TERMINAL 3 WITH 11 LIFT TRUCKS

new container handling equip,emt at Port of Tema. Picture Konecranes, featuring in Africva PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Picture: Konecranes

Konecranes has secured another order for port terminal equipment in West Africa with the supply of 11 container handling units for Meridian Port Services at its new Terminal 3 operation in Tema, Ghana.

Each of the new units will be equipped with the TRUCONNECT Remote Monitoring system.

The order has been brokered by the UK firm of Paterson Simons, which operates extensively in sales and service throughout large parts of West Africa, and…

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AFRICAN BUSINESSES URGED TO ‘DIVE INTO’ THE BLUE ECONOMY

ABEF banner flying on the site of Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

African businesses are being challenged to wake up to the economic, social and environmental power of the Blue Economy.

This comes as momentum is gathering for companies based in Africa’s coastal nations to fully recognise and understand the benefits of backing a Blue Economy, which covers a wide range of productive sectors that are crucial for the continent’s sustainable development, including fisheries, aquaculture, transport, energy, trade and tourism as well as extractive industries.

Research indicates that the Blue Economy has the potential to be a major source of wealth and prosperity for the continent and help advance the African Union’s Agenda 2063 and the UN Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development.

Businesses interested in learning how they can be part of the rising tide involved in the Blue Economy will be able to attend the second Africa Blue Economy Forum (ABEF), which is being held in Tunisia on 25-26 June.

This year’s ABEF2019 to be held in Tunis on 25-26 June 2019 builds on the inaugural event in London last year which explored what the Blue Economy was. This year’s forum aims to take it a stage further and explore how business and government can implement actions that will proactively boost the economic, social and environmental welfare of the continent.

According to ABEF the importance of a cohesive strategy that will protect and utilise Africa’s coastal waters cannot be overstated:

* 70 per cent of Africa’s nations are coastal
* 90 per cent of the continent’s imports and exports are done via sea transportation
* Africa’s maritime industry is estimated to be worth US$1 trillion per year
* The asset value of ocean economy eco-systems is valued at US$24 trillion
* Plastic pollution costs $13 billion per year due to damage caused to marine ecosystems

ABEF2019 will deliver a strong focus on business and government collaboration, highlight investment opportunities and reveal environmental and social impact. Discussions will explore the opportunities and innovations in emerging and frontier sectors of the blue economy and how they can help accelerate Africa’s transformation, create jobs, sustain livelihoods and communities and offer low cost but impactful climate change measures.

Government ministers and officials from Gabon, Ghana, Morocco, Somaliland, Tunisia and Seychelles already confirmed speakers whilst more official delegations from other African countries are also expected to be present.

Leila Ben Hassen, Founder of ABEF, featuring in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Leila Ben Hassen, Founder of ABEF

They will be joined on the platform by business leaders, international investors, ocean innovators and environmental organisations from across the globe, who will share the importance of the Blue Economy in advancing Africa’s development agenda.

“There needs to be more awareness of the Blue Economy and a realisation of how important it is to the future of Africa,” said Leila Ben Hassen, organiser and founder of ABEF2019.

“Governments are beginning to understand this and beginning to implement policies but it still needs the private sector to grasp this and to look at how they can work in partnership with governments and other organisations to make this succeed.”

She said that collaboration was necessary to make this work and deliver huge benefits for the continent enabling it meet the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. “ABEF2019 will begin to lay the foundations for this collaboration process,” she said.

Those wanting to attend this year’s event can do so by registering online at www.ABEF2019.com

ABEF forum to be held in Tunis 25-26 Junes 2019, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

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PORT FOCUS: HUTCHISON PORTS BEST* TERMINAL INCREASES ITS CAPACITY

* Barcelona Europe South Terminal

Automated shipping cranes at Hutchison's BEST terminal (Barcelona), featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Automated shipping cranes at Hutchison’s BEST terminal (Barcelona)

In March 2019, BEST container terminal in the Port of Barcelona, received six new automated cranes (ASC) from the Finnish supplier Konecranes, thereby increasing its storage capacity from 24 to 27 automated blocks. Currently, these blocks are being assembled and tested and they are expected to be fully operational in June this year. This was reported by BEST on 6 May.

These electric rail-mounted cranes are complimentary to Hutchison Ports Group’s commitment to building an efficient and environmentally sustainable terminal in the Port of Barcelona. (See illustration here.)

Guillermo Belcastro, Hutchison Ports BEST CEO stated: “This investment will result in…

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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BLUEYE ROBOTICS & INCHCAPE TO PARTNER USING DRONES FOR UNDERWATER INSPECTION SERVICES

Blueye Pioneer ROV drone, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Blueye Pioneer ROV drone inspecting ship’s propeller

Norway’s Blueye Robotics and Inchcape Shipping Services have entered into a new partnership in which Blueye Robotics will provide underwater inspection services via Inchcape’s global network of ship agents and marine surveyors.

Inchcape with over 3,000 employees is one of the largest maritime services providers, and their Marine Survey and Inspection team will expand underwater inspection services by making use of the Blueye Pioneer.

By being able to deploy the underwater drone within a matter of minutes, the Inchcape team will have a powerful tool saving both time and cost for customers through their global network of over 300 proprietary offices across 68 countries.

Blueye Pioneer, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Drones for frequent and more efficient underwater inspections

The Blueye Pioneer underwater drone has been designed for optimal performance in all conditions and down to depths of 150 metres.

With its vertical design, the Blueye Pioneer ROV is able to operate with total stability and combined with the auto heading and auto depth features, it is exceptionally easy to operate through the Blueye App.

According to Blueye Robotics the underwater drone, with a functional operating time of two hours, powerful LED lights and full HD camera, can be applied to many different use cases.

Blueye Pioneerin action, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Worldwide underwater vessel inspection services

By means of Inchcape’s global Marine Survey and Inspection network, the Inchcape team will use their cutting edge technology, local knowledge and maritime experience to enable underwater inspection while using the Blueye Pioneer.

Inchcape will be supplying services with the ROV in strategic locations around the world, providing a quick, cost effective and safe alternative for underwater inspections. Commencing immediately in Australasia, the survey team combines technology and knowledge to deliver vessel and port infrastructure inspections.

This service with the ROV drone will enable prompt and informed decision making in regards to hull condition and damage reports, bio-foul inspection and management, to support operational, environmental and asset management.

More information is available by email from globalsurvey@iss-shipping.com or oda.ryggen@blueye.no

Now watch this YouTube video showing the Blueye ROV in operation [1:54]

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RAILWAY BETWEEN PORT OF BEIRA AND ZIMBABWE UNDERGOES RECONSTRUCTION

Macipand railway between port of Beira and Zimbabwe is undergoing rehabilitation, and is featured in report in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

A US$200 million rehabilitation of the railway between the Mozambique port of Beira and Zimbabwe is currently underway.

The Cape gauge (3ft 6ins or 1067mm) railway connects the port and the Zimbabwe border at Machipanda and carries freight and cargo to and from not only Zimbabwe but several other neighbouring countries including Zambia and Malawi.

The 318 kilometre railway received…

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EXXONMOBIL PROVIDES $100,000 IN CYCLONE KENNETH RELIEF AID

Red Cross distributing aid ti victims of Cyclone Kenneth in Mozambique, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Funding will be provided to the Red Cross to assist with ongoing disaster relief efforts

Builds upon previous $300,000 contribution following Cyclone Idai

It was announced on 7 May by ExxonMobil in Irving Texas that it is providing $100,000 to support disaster relief and recovery efforts in Mozambique following Cyclone Kenneth, which made landfall on 25 April.

The $100,000 contribution will go to the American Red Cross, which will coordinate its assistance with the Mozambique government’s National Disasters Management Institute in support of ongoing rescue efforts and for food, shelter and comfort for the storm’s victims.

To quote Liam Mallon, president of ExxonMobil Upstream Oil & Gas Company: “We are deeply saddened by the impact of Cyclone Kenneth on Mozambique and surrounding countries. The devastation from cyclones Idai and now Kenneth have been widespread, and this funding will help provide relief during a very difficult time. Our thoughts are with everyone affected.”

ExxonMobil employees and contractors have been reported safe following the cyclone. Since Cyclone Idai, ExxonMobil has contributed more than $400,000 in support of recovery efforts in Mozambique.

In Mozambique, ExxonMobil holds an indirect 25% interest in Area 4 and will lead the construction and operation of onshore natural gas liquefaction plants.

The company also holds 60% operating interest in the Angoche (A5-B) and Zambezi Delta (Z5-C and Z5-D) basins awarded during Mozambique’s fifth licensing round.

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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OIL TANKER APECUS CREW REMAIN AS HOSTAGES AS OWNERS NEGOTIATE WITH PIRATES

The tanker Apecus, as Lachs, by Mike Griffiths, courtesy Shipspotting, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The tanker Apecus, as Lachs, by Mike Griffiths, courtesy Shipspotting

Five Indian crew who were abducted when Nigerian pirates attacked the Togo-registered oil tanker APECUS on 19 April, remain in custody somewhere ashore as the ship’s owners continue to negotiate their release.

The five seafarers (earlier reports said six) were taken away by pirates who had boarded the 3,075-dwt Apecus (IMO 7333810) as the vessel lay at anchor off the coast of Bonny Island on 19 April – to see our report on this incident CLICK HERE</a.

Reports from India say the owners of the tanker have…

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HEAVLIFT SEMI-SUBMERSIBLE BLUE MARLIN HIGHJACKED BY WEST AFRICAN PIRATES

Blue Marlin with an oil rig on boiard as deck cargo, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online. Picture courtesy: Shipspotting
Blue Marlin with an oil rig on board as cargo.    Picture courtesy: Shipspotting

The heavylift semi-submersible vessel BLUE MARLIN (IMO 9186338) was attacked by armed pirates on Sunday (5 May) while sailing approximately 80 nautical miles offshore the coast of Equatorial Guinea in West Africa.

Blue Marlin had recently discharged a cargo in the waters off Equatorial Guinea and was underway heading for Malta when a group of pirates boarded the giant 76,081-dwt vessel from a zodiac-type RIB.

With the alarm being sounded including a call to alert the owners and local authorities, the crew of 20 secured themselves in the ship’s citadel where they remained for the duration of the drama.

The pirates meanwhile were forced to satisfy themselves by ransacking the crew quarters and bridge area of the ship where they used their weapons to cause considerable damage to the navigation instruments and other equipment, before abandoning the ship.

Authorities in the region which included the NATO mission Maritime Domain Awareness for Trade – Gulf of Guinea (MDAT-GoG), responded by immediately dispatching two helicopters from Equatorial Guinea, while two naval vessels both attached to the MDAT-GoG mission, sailed to the assistance of the highjacked ship.

One of these naval vessels was from Equatorial Guinea, the other from the Spanish Navy.

On arrival on scene they found the Blue Marlin to be abandoned by the pirates and after going onboard and searching the vessel they released the crew from the citadel, where all were found to be safe and unharmed.

The damage to the ship has prevented her from sailing further and repairs have commenced. On Monday afternoon (6 May) the Spanish naval ship left the scene, followed that evening by the vessel from the Equatorial Guinea Navy, which left five armed guards on board the Blue Marlin to help secure the vessel from any further incident.

The semi-submersible Blue Marlin with one of her most famous 'lifts', the US Navy Arleigh-class guided missile destroyer USS Cole on 12 October 2000, after USS Cole was severely damaged in an Al-Qaeda attack in Aden harbour. Seventeen US Navy sailors died in the attack and another 39 suffered injuries. After being returned to the United States on board Blue Marlin, USS Cole was repaired and has returned to service, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The semi-submersible Blue Marlin with one of her most famous ‘lifts’, the US Navy Arleigh-class guided missile destroyer USS Cole on 12 October 2000, after USS Cole was severely damaged in an Al-Qaeda attack in Aden harbour. Seventeen US Navy sailors died in the attack and another 39 suffered injuries. After being returned to the United States on board Blue Marlin, USS Cole was repaired and has returned to service

The owners (Royal Boskalis Westminster NV) have arranged for an ocean-going tug to attend the stricken ship and move her to a safe location.

“I want to express my compliments to our crew for their extremely professional and adequate actions in this life threatening situation,” said Boskalis CEO, Peter Berdowski.

“I am extremely grateful and in particular thankful to the navy of Equatorial Guinea for their quick and decisive response, as well as to the Spanish navy for their assistance via MDAT-GoG. Because of their actions, this hijacking could be ended quickly and our colleagues were brought into safety.”

Marine Domain Awareness for Trade – Gulf of Guinea (MDAT-GoG) was created by the French and UK authorities after taking into account their respective experience and the role of earlier combined operations in the region (principally MTISC-GoG). The result is a new contribution to the maritime information network in the Gulf of Guinea by means of a virtual reporting centre.

Known as Marine Domain Awareness for Trade – Gulf of Guinea (MDAT-GoG), this commenced operations in June 2016. MDAT-GoG is operated by the navies of France and the United Kingdom from centres in Brest, France, and Portsmouth, United Kingdom but is able to call on the support of other EU navies in the region, as with the example of Blue Marlin above. MDAT-GoG can be contacted as follows: email: watchkeepers@mdat-gog.org

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AFRICAN CONTINENTAL FREE TRADE AGREEMENT (AfCFTA) SET TO ENTER INTO FORCE ON 30 MAY 2019

When African leaders met in Kigali to sign the original documents setting Africa on the path to a Free Trade Agreement, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
When African leaders met in Kigali to sign the original documents setting Africa on the path to a Free Trade Agreement

The African Union (AU) Commission has announced that the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) is set to enter into force on 30 May.

This follows Sierra Leone and the Saharawi Republic each depositing their AfCFTA instruments of ratification to the AU Commission.

“The two deposits meet the minimum threshold of ratifications required under Article 23 of the AfCFTA Agreement for it to enter into force 30 days after the deposit of the 22nd deposit, which is made by the Saharawi Republic,” the statement said.

“The AfCFTA Agreement will, in this regard, enter into force on 30th May, 2019.

“All that is now left is for the African Union and African Ministers of Trade to…

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HAPAG-LlOYD TALKS ABOUT GROWTH PLANS IN GHANA

Tema's new container terminal as it will appear when completed later this year, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Tema’s new container terminal as it should appear when completed later this year

“Africa is a key area of interest for our Strategy 2023”

In this interview Tim Phillips, Managing Director of Hapag-Lloyd Ghana, speaks about the new deepwater port in Tema and the potential for setting up new feeder services in West Africa.

 

Tim Phillips, Hapag-Lloyd MD Ghana featuring in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Thanks to its political stability and economic strength, Ghana is viewed as a model country in West Africa. Who are Hapag-Lloyd’s customers there, and what are the most important imports and exports?

On the export side, Ghana’s cocoa trade is very important along with refrigerated products, such as bananas, mangoes, pineapples and yams. Our customers range from small independent farmers on the local level to larger international commodity traders. Inbound, we see a lot of machinery and most types of end products coming into Tema from the Far East and Northern Europe. In this case, we also see a large share of local SMEs importing goods in small quantities. This translates into a heavy workload for our Customer Service colleagues on the import side.

How is Ghana connected to Hapag-Lloyd’s global network?

We currently have two services that call at Tema. Our West Africa Express (WAX) service connects us to Antwerp and Hamburg. And we also have our Mediterranean West Africa Express (MWX) service sailing from Tangier and Algeciras. The WAX service operates with five ships in the 2,800 TEU capacity range, while the MWX service has four vessels in the 4,200 TEU capacity range. Tema is currently linked to Hapag-Lloyd’s global network via our transshipment hub in Tangier, Morocco, for eastbound cargo and in Antwerp, in Northern Europe, for westbound cargo.

Apart from South Africa, why is Ghana the only African country with its own Hapag-Lloyd office?

I prefer to call it the first country besides South Africa to have its own Hapag-Lloyd office. Africa is a key area of interest for our Strategy 2023, and we will definitely be looking at other opportunities going forward. We are counting on the logistics industry to establish Ghana as an operational hub for West Africa. Since 2006, when Hapag-Lloyd acquired CP Ships, we have been represented by third-party agents, and they have done a great job. However, by 2017, it became apparent that we needed to expand our footprint, so we opened our own office in Tema in February 2018. In mid-March of this year, we moved into a larger space. Our workforce has slightly increased due to growing volumes with our port-to-port services and carrier haulage services into the hinterland. We expect this to continue in the short term as soon as we are fully settled in.

That depends a lot on the new container terminal that is supposed to go into operation in the Port of Tema in late June. How much of a boost will it give to Hapag-Lloyd’s business?

This will definitely be a significant game changer for West Africa as a whole. We now see enormous potential for Hapag-Lloyd to be able to finally increase capacity and open new areas in this region. We have been working on growing in Africa for some time now, and the new terminal will now allow us to do that. To date, we have only been able to handle 4,000-5,000 TEU vessels at the old terminal. But, in the next few years, we expect to see 14,000 TEU ships at the new terminal.

Tema has an ideal geographical location right in the middle of the most important ports of West Africa. The port range that we envisage – and the ports that could be served from Tema by feeders within a one-week round voyage – are those between Douala, Cameroon, to the east and Conakry, Guinea, to the west. Optimally, this would be one weekly feeder service sailing eastbound and another sailing westbound. This could start next year, once the new terminal starts ramping up its operations. We’re already in discussions with the managers of various terminals in West Africa about potentially dovetailing feeder sailing schedules for optimal transshipment times. What’s more, given the congestion in Tangier, we also want to serve the markets in the Middle East and India by sailing around the cape in South Africa. At the moment, we are thinking about adding a new service with nine vessels and of perhaps having one partner servicing ports in West Africa, South Africa, the Middle East and India.

To what extent are the landlocked countries in the area – such as Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger – served via Tema?

To date, Hapag-Lloyd has only serviced these countries to a limited extent. But that will change a lot with the new terminal. With its handling capacity of 1 million TEU, the Port of Tema has been at 90 percent capacity utilisation for the past one or two years. There were no opportunities for growth. As a result, much of the hinterland transport headed to Burkina Faso has gone through Abidjan in Ivory Coast, and much of the traffic headed to Mali has gone through Dakar in Senegal. This year, the Tema office will be focusing on the landlocked countries. We’ve added a new position in the Ghana office that is dedicated to expanding and growing the hinterland business. We want a local approach with a standardised service offer.

Is there any niche business for Hapag-Lloyd in Ghana?

One of the niche businesses we’re focusing on is the banana trade, which is steadily growing in Ghana. We can offer our customers detailed expertise thanks to the considerable experience we have already gained in this field in other ports in Africa.

What are the goals of our Sales team in Ghana?

A big share of exports from Ghana are controlled from outside the country on a free-on-board (FOB) basis. FOB is a so-called “Incoterm”, the three-letter international commercial terms developed by the International Chamber of Commerce for customary contractual terms in the international trade of goods. FOB stipulates that responsibility for the goods passes from the seller to the buyer as soon as the freight arrives on board. Our Sales team is therefore very much focused on the CIF (cost, insurance, freight) business, which mainly comes from SMEs. At the same time, the Sales team is working closely with our overseas colleagues to ensure the best possible results with FOB.

Acknowledgements: Hapag-Lloyd Insights; republished with permission

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NEW SENSORS PROTECT VULNERABLE MALAWIANS AGAINST DEADLY LIGHTNING

In tropical countries like Malawi, people who work outdoors are particularly susceptible to lightning strikes.  Picture: November 2018 by UNDP Malawi, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
In tropical countries like Malawi, people who work outdoors are particularly susceptible to lightning strikes.  Picture: November 2018 by UNDP Malawi

The deadly threat of lightning strikes, as well as their damaging impact on a country’s development, has been recognised in a new project supported by the UN Development Programme (UNDP).

In tropical countries such as Malawi, people who work outdoors are particularly susceptible to lightning strikes. This was reported at the end of 2018 by UNDP Malawi. Further reports this month (May 2019) indicate there are more deaths from lightning in developing countries, especially in tropical electrical storm-prone regions, largely because more people work outdoors and fewer buildings are protected against strikes.

Furthermore, in tropical climates it was reported that countries here suffer 78% of all lightning events, and in the absence of readily-accessible medical facilities, lightning injuries are likely to be fatal.

By way of example Malawi’s annual death rate from lightning had been reported as: “…extremely high compared to other countries in the world”, that is 16 times higher than similar sub-regions in South Africa, and 50 times higher than that for the US.

UNDP at work

Lightning strikes can cause fatalities, especially in developing countries. Picture: Ziemowit Porębski ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Lightning strikes can cause fatalities, especially in developing countries. Picture: Ziemowit Porębski ©

In Malawi, UNDP has been working with government agencies to install eight lightning detection sensors across the country which can warn people – particularly those who could be in danger such as farmers and fishing communities – that a storm is imminent.

As another year of devastating events unfolds, including Cyclone Idai – one of the worst tropical cyclones on record to affect Africa and the Southern Hemisphere – natural disasters are a constant reminder that whatever progress is made in reducing disaster risk, more is needed.

In direct response to this need, a project, funded by the Green Climate Fund, Scaling up the Use of Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning systems (M-CLIMES*), is working to improve early warning weather and climate information systems to protect vulnerable communities.

Implemented by Malawi’s Department of Disaster Management Affairs (DODMA), in partnership with Department of Climate Change and Meteorological Services (DCCMS) and UNDP support, the project is working to expand the information network by installing automatic weather stations, hydrological monitoring stations, and lake-based meteorological buoys. These efforts will in turn increase the capacity to identify risks and forecast impacts with precision.

One certain way in which the project is working to protect lives and livelihoods is through the provision of lightning detection sensors – these calculate the direction and severity of lightning – indicating storm strength and are able to precisely locate lightning during a thunderstorm, and warn rural communities.

To date, DCCMS, with project support, has installed eight lightning detection sensors across the country to detect lightning and thunder including one at Chileka International Airport.

By raising awareness with affected communities, the capacity of local communities, district councils, and national agencies to respond to emergencies will be strengthened through training and improved emergency services. Through these efforts, it is anticipated that 2.1 million people will benefit from increased preparedness.

Tropical cyclone Idai. NASA Earth Observatory ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Tropical cyclone Idai. NASA Earth Observatory ©

In April 2019, in Lilongwe, DCCMS trained 14 meteorologists in lightning detection methodologies to operate on the department’s newly-procured system, which will help to reduce the burdens the country suffers due to lightning.

Researchers noted that in Malawi: “lightning is indeed a very serious threat to the country’s socio-economic development” owing to the higher probability that young labourers in their prime earning years are struck, the high costs of lightning injuries (including hearing damage, chronic pain, and psychological wounds), and the devastation that results from premature death.

Speaking in Lilongwe at the April training, DCCMS Deputy Director for Engineering and Communication Rodrick Walusa said: “The sensors will help to warn the general public to increase caution and vigilance, particularly in areas where lightning is projected to strike.”

He said the department, through the M-CLIMES project saw the need to support the government of Malawi to procure the equipment to help reduce deaths caused by lightning.

The system will also send accurate messages to air traffic controllers for them to be able to advise pilots on weather en route.

More information is to be found by: CLICKING HERE

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

* Modernized Climate Information and Early Warning Systems.

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SOUTH AFRICA-SOUTH SUDAN SIGN OIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION SHARING AGREEMENT

The oil fields of Sudan and South Sudan, where South Africa is now invoved, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The oil fields of Sudan and South Sudan, where South Africa is now invoved

The signing yesterday (Monday) of the new exploration and production sharing agreement (EPSA) between South Sudan and South Africa’s Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF) is seen as a strategic boost to both countries – for South Africa as an energy consumer, and for South Sudan as a boost to the oil sector and promoting peace and stability within the country.

showing progress for the country’s oil industry as production resumes at existing oilfields and new exploration begins.

The landmark deal will see Block B2 operated by South Africa’s state-owned Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF), the Ministry of Petroleum and Nilepet – South Sudan’s national oil company.

This is the second EPSA signed since South Sudan gained independence in 2012 and marks yet another achievement for…

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NO CHINESE LOAN TO FURTHER DEVELOP KENYA’S SGR TO KISUMU

US$1.4 billion Kisumu Port rebuild placed on hold

Lake Victoria ship Uhuru at Kisumu port, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Lake Victoria ship Uhuru at Kisumu port

The recent visit to China by a Kenyan delegation led by President Uhuru Kenyatta has failed to secure a $3.68 billion loan that would have been used to extend the Kenyan standard gauge railway (SGR) from Naivasha to the Lake Victoria port city of Kisumu and from there to Malaba on the Uganda border.

The failure to obtain a further Chinese loan comes as a great disappointment to those with ambitions of the ongoing extension of the railway and its related construction of a new port at Kisumu for the expected increase in lake traffic arising from a fast rail link to Mombasa.

The extension to Kisumu and Malaba is a necessary step of…

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50 YEARS OF ROYAL NAVY NUCLEAR SERVICE: NEW SUBMARINE IS NAMED

Secretary of State for Defence, The Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt MP (right), seen here with the First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Sir Philip Jones KCB ADC (left), leaving the Service at Westminster Abbey in London, to mark 50 years of Britain’s nuclear deterrent submarine patrols. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Secretary of State for Defence, The Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt MP (right), seen here with the First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Sir Philip Jones KCB ADC (left), leaving the Service at Westminster Abbey in London, to mark 50 years of Britain’s nuclear deterrent submarine patrols. Picture: MoD Crown Copyright 2019 ©

The UK Defence Secretary announced on 3 May that the fourth Dreadnought submarine will be named HMS KING GEORGE VI ahead of a special service at Westminster Abbey that day to recognise the Royal Navy’s Continuous at Sea Deterrent (CASD) over the past 50 years.

Since April 1969, a Royal Navy ballistic missile submarine has patrolled every single day, without interruption, providing the nation’s deterrent and helping keep the UK its allies safe. This is the UK’s longest sustained military operation ever undertaken and is known as Operation Relentless.

Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt (appointed earlier in the week in place of Gavin Williamson) commented: “Operation Relentless has seen generations of submariners from HMS Resolution to HMS Vengeance on constant watch, for every minute of every day for the last five decades. This is the longest military operation we have ever undertaken and continues right this minute deep under the sea.

“We pay tribute to those incredible crews, their supportive families, the Royal Navy and the thousands of industry experts who will continue to sustain this truly national endeavour for many years to come.”

Dreadnought Class

Dreadnought class nuclear submarine, of which the latest will be named HMS King George VI, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Dreadnought class nuclear submarine, of which the latest will be named HMS King George VI    Image: Royal Navy

CASD50 has provided a chance to not only remember the national endeavour of the past half century but to look to the next-generation of ballistic missile submarines, the Dreadnought class. This will consist of four boats helping to ensure the security of generations to come. The Dreadnought-class are expected to enter service in the early 2030s, helping to maintain Operation Relentless.

HMS King George VI makes history as it will become the first naval vessel to bear that royal title. King George VI had strong naval connections having spent time at the Royal Naval College, Osbourne followed by Dartmouth. He then went on to earn a Mention in Despatches for his service in HMS Collingwood during the Battle of Jutland.

It is estimated that around 30,000 people are involved in building and supporting nuclear submarines across the UK. Maintaining this skilled workforce helps to invest millions of pounds into local communities and ensures the UK continues to boast a highly-skilled workforce in this sector.

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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SAMSA CONCERN OVER POSSIBLE IMO STCW ‘WHITE LIST’ DELISTING OF SOUTH AFRICA

APL vessel accompanying report by SAMSA on South Africa's possible White List delisting, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

The announced possible delisting of South Africa along with 80 or more other countries from the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) ‘White List’ of countries compliant with the 1978 STCW Convention, as amended, is a matter of major concern, says the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA).

The agency was responding to an IMO Maritime Safety Committee’s circular to Member States stating the committee’s intention to remove all countries from its White List that were not compliant with requirements of the 1978 STCW Convention as amended.

The IMO’s 1978 STCW Convention stipulates standards of training, certification and watch-keeping for seafarers.

According to the IMO: “The main purpose of the Convention is to promote safety of life and property at sea and the protection of the marine environment by establishing in common agreement international standards of training, certification and watchkeeping for seafarers.”

SAMSA is the country’s agency responsible for South Africa’s compliance with this and other conventions and similar instruments.

In February the IMO issued a circular expressing its intention to remove from its register all countries that were non complaint with the convention, along with a list reflecting that as many as 87 countries – including South Africa – would be affected.

The circular simply stated the intention but provided no set date for implementation of the action.

SAMSA acting CEO Sobantu Tilayi commenting on SA's possibled elisting from the IMO White List, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Sobantu Tilayi

In a statement in Pretoria on Thursday, SAMSA acting Chief Executive Officer, Mr Sobantu Tilayi confirmed that the agency was extremely concerned by the development announced by the IMO in February, as it had major implications for the country’s maritime sector.

“Even as we have a serious situation in our hands, and should never have found ourselves in this position, I am confident that we will act with speed and do so correctly to ensure that the intended action by the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee is not finalised to South Africa’s disadvantage,” Tilayi said.

The planned response action plan involves three broad activities; the securing of IMO assistance with compilation of the report required in terms of the convention, the hastening of a SAMSA process setting in place a relevant quality management system, and constant engagement with stakeholders.

In the video below, Mr Tilayi speaks at length about the entire saga but also about what SAMSA is already doing to prevent South Africa from being formally delisted possibly later in 2019.

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BOOST FOR MOMBASA PORT AS SGR AND PORT MODERNISATION YIELD RESULTS

Mombasa's developing second container terminal, featured in report in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Mombasa’s developing second container terminal illustrated

The introduction of the standard gauge railway (SGR) between Mombasa and Nairobi and a corresponding modernisation programme at the port is yielding positive results for the Mombasa port.

This assumption can be made based on increased revenue being generated by Kenya’s main gateway to not only for the country’s trade but trade with neighbouring states as well.

The modernisation programme at the port of Mombasa includes…

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CMA CGM BOOSTS CASHEW NUT RUN BETWEEN AFRICA AND VIETNAM

CMA CGM's new AFEX port rotation, reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
AFEX new rotation

French shipping giant CMA CGM is upgrading the quality of its AFEX service connecting West Africa to Asia for the export of cashew nuts from Benin and Ghana.

The line says that in response to customers’ needs for a direct weekly service from Benin and Ghana to Vietnam, a…

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GOOD START TO THE YEAR FOR PORT OF NACALA

Nacala port and railway network inckluding Nacal-a-Velha (coal terminal), featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Nacala port and railway network inckluding Nacala-a-Velha (coal terminal)

While it would appear that the port of Nacala in northern Mozambique has escaped the ravages of Cyclone Kenneth because it being sufficiently far south of the devastating cyclone, news has been received that the port has experienced an excellent first quarter.

During the first three months of 2019 the amount of cargo handled at Nacala went up to 510,000 tonnes, compared with a figure of…

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ECOWAS REGIONAL TRANSPORT INTEGRATION PROJECT GETS UNDERWAY

Member states of ECOWAS as featured in aarticle in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Member states of ECOWAS

Feasibility studies on the Abidjan-Lagos Expressway Project has commenced and the West African Growth Ring Master plan (WAGRM) has been completed.

The WAGRM has economic potential that could enhance the collective growth of Ghana, Togo, La Cote D’Ivoire and Burkina Faso.

According to the minister for Roads and Highways, Kwesi Amoako Atta, the projects are an indication that the integration agenda of ECOWAS is on a very good course.

He was speaking at a two-day regional consultation meeting of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) held…

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CANADIAN NAVY SHIP MAKES ANOTHER TWO DRUG BUSTS IN ARABIAN SEA

HMCS Regina and crew show off the first of two recent drug busts made in the north-western Indian Ocean. Pictures: CTF 150, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
HMCS Regina and crew show off the first of two recent drug busts made in the north-western Indian Ocean.      Pictures: CTF 150

A large amount of the narcotics seized by naval and other security forces and units operating in the Arabian Sea, Southern Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean are destined for Africa, either to help fund the various terror groups that remain active in several parts of the continent, or for smuggling into different countries of Africa including South Africa and from there to Europe and the United States.

Much of the smuggling involves stateless merchant dhows that operate freely throughout the region while moving a significant amount of legal and sometimes illegal trade between regions.

The Combined Task Force (CTF 150) is the multinational maritime force whose mission is to maintain maritime security and prevent…

HMCS Regina's sea boat in action, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

 

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NIGERIAN SHIPPERS COUNCIL MOVES ON UNDER-DECLARATION OF IMPORTED GOODS

Nigerian Shippers Council banner, flying in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

The Nigerian Shippers Council (NSC) says it intends tackling the question of under-declaration of imported goods that the NSC says is coming into Nigeria by means of introducing a security application called Cargo Tracking Note.

NSC Executive Secretary, Mr Hassan Bello said last week in Abuja that the Cargo Tracking Note application had…

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NIGERIAN PORTS AUTHORITY TO OPEN TWO TRUCK STAGING PARKS IN LAGOS

Gridlock, Lagos style, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Gridlock, Lagos style

The Nigerian Ports Authority has announced that two transit staging truck stops will soon be commissioned in Lagos in order to help alleviate truck congestion outside the ports.

One of the truck stops will be at Tin Can Island Second Gate and the other at Lillypond.

Lagos has been plagued with truck congestion for a number of years, with the build-up of road congestion steadily becoming worse until some port access roads have become completely gridlocked.

According to the statement Dr Davies Sekonte, NPA Executive Director, Marine and Operations, has said the…

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TNPA PORT ELIZABETH MARKS WORLD HEALTH & SAFETY DAY

Port Elizabeth Port Manager, Rajesh Dana (front) and Harbour Master, Captain Brynn Adamson (front row, far right) with employees showcasing their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) from marine services, the harbour master’s department, the civil depot, diving, garden services, fire and emergency services as well as port security, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Port Manager, Rajesh Dana (front) and Harbour Master, Captain Brynn Adamson (front row, far right) with employees showcasing their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) from marine services, the harbour master’s department, the civil depot, diving, garden services, fire and emergency services as well as port security

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) at Port Elizabeth commemorated the 100th anniversary of the International Labour Organisation’s (ILO), World Health and Safety Day at Work.

Although the actual day was celebrated on Sunday, 28 April this year, the Port of PE used the opportunity to reignite staff awareness on the importance of health and safety at work on a week day.

This day helps us as TNPA to involve employees to participate, engage and discuss issues of health and safety at work”,”said PE port manager Rajesh Dana.

“Whilst the aim is to make the day as fun filled and educational as possible, it is also important to ensure that the true message that the day conveys is not forgotten.”

Dana said that as TNPA they are proud, not only to celebrate days like these, but also of the safety culture that the organisation instills in all of them. “TNPA lives the idea that safety is all our responsibility and that it is the way we can ensure ZERO harm to our employees and stakeholders,”he said.

Jefferson Isaacs from the port’s diving section performs a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) demonstration in the port of Port Elizabeth, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Jefferson Isaacs from the port’s diving section performs a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) demonstration in the port

Tim Fox, Rail Operations Manager at Fresh Produce Terminal said he was honoured to have been part of this day with TNPA. “As an ex-employee of Transnet myself, I can attest to the strides that the company has made in ensuring that its employees and stakeholders know what is expected of them from a health and safety perspective every single day.

“Of significance is that this centenary celebration of the ILO marks many years of continuous improvement in occupational health and safety. Changes in technology, demography and sustainable development have significantly contributed to the evolution of the organisational work place,” Fox added.

The day started with a vibrant Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) fashion show, where employees from marine, fire and emergency services, garden services, port security and diving showed off their unique PPE outfits which keep them safe during the execution of their duties.

Employees were then educated via a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) simulation and information on causes of hypertension and how it can be managed.

The rest of the day was filled with competitive paintball, touch rugby, street soccer and many more activities. What was evident was that whilst employees had fun, safety remained a priority.

The Port of PE’s management team is ready to conduct Visible Felt Leadership, which is the role management plays as change agents and facilitators of a safety culture in an organisation through observations and engagements with stakeholders, employees and customers - ensuring continuous improvement in the workplace in relation to health and safety. In the front row from the left are Faisal Sultan (Operations), Zinhle Small (Property), Nelson Masophi (Security), Zanda Mkhulisi (SHE) and Rajesh Dana (Port Manager). In the back row are from the left Captain Brynn Adamson (Harbour Master), Sujit Bhagattjee (New Business Development), Theo Sethosa (Engineering), Ian Du Preez (IT) and Xolani Ngcivana (Procurement), featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The Port of PE’s management team is ready to conduct Visible Felt Leadership, which is the role management plays as change agents and facilitators of a safety culture in an organisation through observations and engagements with stakeholders, employees and customers – ensuring continuous improvement in the workplace in relation to health and safety. In the front row from the left are Faisal Sultan (Operations), Zinhle Small (Property), Nelson Masophi (Security), Zanda Mkhulisi (SHE) and Rajesh Dana (Port Manager). In the back row are from the left Captain Brynn Adamson (Harbour Master), Sujit Bhagattjee (New Business Development), Theo Sethosa (Engineering), Ian Du Preez (IT) and Xolani Ngcivana (Procurement)

 

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TAU MORWE STEPS DOWN AFTER SIX MONTHS AS ACTING HEAD OF TRANSNET

Tau Morwe, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Tau Morwe

The Transnet board of directors has announced that the contract of the acting group chief executive Tau Morwe will not be further extended, after Morwe served for a total of two three-month terms following the dismissal of Siyabonga Gama.

Morwe previously held positions as head of three Transnet divisions before retiring some years ago. He was brought back by President Ramaphosa to serve a three-month tenure as acting group CE after Gama was removed, and had his contract renewed for a further three months ending 30 April.

During his period as acting head of Transnet Morwe set in motion a number of programmes and plans aimed at addressing the issues facing the parastatal, which has come under the focus of investigations into corruption concerning the controversial locomotive purchase, ordered prior to Morwe’s temporary appointment, and other issues.

In statement the Transnet board said it commits to continuing with the programme and plans started by Morwe.

As Transnet’s new group CE the board has appointed Mohammed Mahomedy but also in an acting capacity. Mahomedy has been Transnet’s acting chief financial officer for the past 12 months.

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GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

in partnership with – APO

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EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

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THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

““Limitations are like mirages created by your own mind. When you realise that limitation do not exist, those around you will also feel it and allow you inside their space.”

– Stephen Richards

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