Africa PORTS & SHIPS Maritime News 11 March 2019

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002
Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

Intermodal Djibouti March 2019, featured on Africa PORTS & SHIPS

Come with us as we report through 2019

♠♠♠

ADVERTISING

Advertise with us. For a Rate Card email us at info@africaports.co.za

**********

TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

These news reports are updated and added to on an ongoing basis. Check back regularly for the latest news as it develops – where necessary refresh your page at www.africaports.co.za

Click on headline to go direct to story : use the BACK key to return

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

 

SEND NEWS REPORTS AND PRESS RELEASES TO
info@africaports.co.za

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

FIRST VIEW 1: ASTORIA BRIDGE

Astoria Bridge arriving in Durban, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS. Picture: Trevor Jones
Astoria Bridge. Picture: Trevor Jones

K-Line’s container ship ASTORIA BRIDGE (IMO 9409041) enters Durban harbour for a berth at the container terminal. The 51,314-dwt ship, which is owned and managed by Japanese interests has remained a K-Line ship since being built in 2009. With an overall length of 262-metres and a width of 32,2m Astoria Bridge has a maximum container capacity of 4,300 TEU (effectively 3,000 when each container is loaded). The ship was built at Hyundai Heavy Industries Ltd shipyards in South Korea as their yard or hull number 1976. This picture is by Trevor Jones

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

VIGILENCE ESSENTIAL DESPITE REDUCTION TO PIRACY IN THE HIGH RISK AREA OF THE INDIAN OCEAN

Vide BMP5

From USN news archive of 2010 the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) passes by the smoke from a suspected pirate skiff it had just destroyed. At the time USS Farragut was part of Combined Task Force 151, a multinational task force established to conduct anti-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden. Photo: Cassandra Thompson, US Navy. Image released by the United States Navy, USN ©. ID 100331-N-8959T-308, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
From USN news archive of 2010 the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Farragut (DDG 99) passes by the smoke from a suspected pirate skiff it had just destroyed. At the time USS Farragut was part of Combined Task Force 151, a multinational task force established to conduct anti-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden. Photo: Cassandra Thompson, US Navy. Image released by the United States Navy, USN ©. ID 100331-N-8959T-308

The Round Table of international shipping associations plus the Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF) representing the global shipping and oil industry have announced the geographic boundaries of the High Risk Area for piracy in the Indian Ocean have been reduced, with new advice issued to merchant ship operators. This was reported on Friday, 8 March.

The High Risk Area reflects the area where the threat from piracy exists, whilst recognising the ongoing containment of pirate attacks in the Indian Ocean. The industry group of shipping and oil industry organisations BIMCO, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS), INTERCARGO, INTERTANKO and the Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF) responsible for setting the High Risk Area emphasised that a serious threat remains despite the reduction to the area’s geographic boundaries and that correct reporting, vigilance and adherence to fifth edition of the best management practice (BMP5) remains crucial.

The reduction to the High Risk Area takes full account of recent shipping industry experience, pirate intent and capability and follows extensive consultation with nations, collations and military naval forces, including Combined Maritime Forces, EUNAVFOR and the United Kingdom Maritime Trade Operations (UKMTO), which continue to provide vital advice and protection to shipping.

The regional UKHO Maritime Security Chart, Q6099 will be updated by Notice to Mariners and a new version produced to reflect these changes which take effect from 1 May 2019.

The advice can be downloaded via the industry organisations website: CLICK HERE

In summary:

* The area previously classified as high risk forms only a part of the area called the Voluntary Reporting Area (VRA).

* Ships entering the VRA are encouraged to report to the UKMTO to be monitored during transit and register with the Maritime Security Centre for the Horn of Africa (MSCHOA).

* Pre-transit risk assessments should take into account the latest information from both the VRA and High Risk Area.

Industry associations further emphasised that in view of the continuing threat of pirate attacks, shipping companies must continue to maintain full compliance with BMP5 and be vigilant in their voluntary reporting on piracy incidents, sighting of potential pirates, and any suspicious activity – as this provides crucial intelligence on risk levels in the area.

The industry associations will continue to monitor developments to the security situation, and will adjust the HRA again if and when the situation warrants it.

Best management practices document BMP 5

BMP5: Best Management Practices To Deter Piracy And Enhance Maritime Security in the Red Sea, Gulf Of Aden, Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea is a joint industry publication that helps ships plan their voyage and detect, avoid, deter, delay and report attacks.

Digital copies are free to be downloaded from the website www.maritimeglobalsecurity.org

Printed copies are also available at no charge from Witherby Seamanship at www.witherbyseamanship.com

Contact details for the industry associations are as follows:

BIMCO
Rasmus Nord Jørgensen, Communications Director: Tel: +45 21690421
Email: rnj@bimco.org

ICS
Debra Massey (Elaborate Communications): Tel +44 (0) 1296 682356
Email: dmassey@elabor8.co.uk

INTERTANKO
Dr Phillip Belcher, Marine Director: Tel: +44 (0)20 7977 7033
Email: phillip.belcher@intertanko.com

INTERCARGO
Xianyong (Joe) Zhou, Operations Manager: Tel: + (0)20 7977 7029
Email: xianyong.zhou@intercargo.org

OCIMF
Russell Pegg, Security Adviser: Tel: +44 (0) 207 654 1202
Email: russell.pegg@ocimf.org

OCIMF banner, eatured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

About the Round Table of international shipping associations

The Round Table comprises international shipping associations: BIMCO, ICS, INTERTANKO and INTERCARGO. Its mission is to work together to serve, represent and advance the international shipping industry.

Its goals are:

  • To act in concert to avoid duplication on issues of consensus, where the combined effort of the Round Table can exceed the sum of the individual efforts.
  • Present the industry’s arguments in a clear, co-ordinated, consistent and unambiguous manner.
  • Enhance political and public awareness of the essential role of shipping in world trade.
  • Encourage a positive and respected response to the industry on the part of society at large.
  • Communicate the performance of the industry.
  • Provide guidance to the industry on relevant topical issues.
  • Develop measures for credible and effective self-regulation within the industry whilst promoting the case for a proper balance between regulation and self-regulation.
  • Support the principle of international rather than regional or unilateral regulation.
  • Advance quality in shipping, and the universal commitment to maritime safety and environmental responsibility.
  • Ensure that shipping provides a challenging and rewarding career for persons of commitment, initiative and enthusiasm.
  • Promote the shipping industry as an attractive employer.

About the Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF)

OCIMF is the foremost authority on the safe and environmentally responsible operation of oil tankers, terminals and offshore support vessels, promoting continuous improvement in standards of design and operation. Its remit now covers tankers, barges, offshore support vessels and terminals and its advice extends to issues like shipping in ice and large-scale piracy.

See also: www.ocimf.org

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

BIDVEST APPOINTS MPUMI MADISA AS NEW CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER-DESIGNATE

South Africa’s President Cyril Ramaphosa has reached out to offer his warm congratulations to Mpumi Madisa on her appointment as Bidvest Chief Executive Officer designate.

Mpumi Madisa

Bidvest, a leading South African services, trading and distribution group which is deeply involved with the maritime sector, announced last week that Madisa would succeed Lindsay Ralphs who was retiring.

The announcement that Madisa was CEO-designate was made on the eve of International Women’s Day, which was being observed on Friday (8 March 2019).

“The emergence of Mpumi Madisa as Chief Executive of a major corporation in our economy is a significant personal achievement that also signifies a new advance in gender transformation in business,” the President said.

He described her appointment as an inspiration that sets an example for many companies, especially at the level of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) Top 40, in the development of human capital and the transformation of society.

“Ms Madisa’s appointment is therefore an occasion for celebration and for renewed commitment to accelerated change and progress in the highest echelons of our economy,” President Ramaphosa said.

Lindsay Ralphs

Madisa will head the trading and distribution company from July 2020, when the current CEO Lindsay Ralphs retires.

She becomes the first woman to lead this major industrial group which employs 137,000 people and has a market capitalisation of R72 billion.

Madisa joined Bidvest in 2003 and has held various senior management and executive board director positions such as general manager business development, divisional director business development, corporate affairs director and sales and marking director.

Madisa is a Board Director of 16 Bidvest subsidiaries, a board director of Adcock Ingram and a board director of Business Leadership South Africa.

She holds a Master’s Degree in Finance and Investment from the Wits Business School as well as a BComm Honours Degree in Economics and a BSc in Economics and Mathematics from Wits University.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

A FINE NAVAL BIOGRAPHY: HENRY HARWOOD, HERO OF THE RIVER PLATE

Henry Harwood, Hero of the River Plate
By Peter Hore

Published by Seaforth Publishing, a division of Pen & Sword Books Ltd
www.pen-and-sword.co.uk
To order see: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Henry-Harwood-Hardback/p/14805
Hardback; 244 pages; price £20.00
ISBN 978 1 5267 2529 5

This is the latest title by Captain Peter Hore and issued by Seaforth Publishing / Pen & Sword of Barnsley, S Yorkshire.

Book Review: Henry Harwood, Hero of the River Plate, by Peter Hore. Picture credit: Seaforth Publishing ©
Picture credit: Seaforth Publishing ©

The foreword is by Admiral Sir Jock Slater, First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff from 1995 to 1998.

Henry Harwood Harwood (1888-1950) is best known for his actions which led to the destruction of the German pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee at the Battle of the River Plate in December 1939. Of this success Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, said: “This brilliant sea fight takes its place in our naval annals and in a long, cold, dark winter it warmed the cockles of the British hearts…it was a flash of light and colour…a great action which will long be told in song and story.”

Admiral Sir Henry Harwood’s wider naval career was remarkable and epitomised the Royal Navy in the first half of the 20th century. He became a naval cadet in 1903, specialised as a torpedo officer in 1911, and for his services in the First World War was appointed OBE in 1919. He was one of the Navy’s intellectuals, it has been said gaining first class passes in all his examinations and, during his interwar service on the South American station, learning Spanish.

During his service in important staff appointments and at the Imperial Defence College, he made a particular study of international relations and, in the light of perceived failings at sea in the First World War, of naval tactics and command. He was thus well-qualified when in 1936 he became Commodore-in-Command of the South American division of the America and West Indies Station, and well prepared to meet and defeat the German pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee with his inferior force of cruisers in 1939. More than 50 pages are devoted to what became known as The Battle of the River Plate, from the outbreak of war with its preparations to the eventual scuttling of Admiral Graf Spee off Montevideo and death by his own hand of her CO, Captain Hans Langsdorff.

Harwood was promoted Assistant Chief of Naval Staff at the Admiralty, and, in 1942, appointed Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean, in succession to Sir Andrew Cunningham (incidentally, great-uncle to Admiral Sir Jock Slater who writes the book’s foreword)

Then, with a land and air forces’ HQ in Cairo and naval HQ in Alexandria, commanding a fleet too enfeebled for its tasks, Harwood found General Montgomery plotting against him and Churchill losing confidence in him before being relieved of his command. Invalided out of the Navy in 1945, he was wrongly blamed by some for the Navy’s perceived failings in the Mediterranean, a grossly unfair testament.

This is not only a fine biography but it gives valuable insight into respect for Britain in South America. Here, between the wars, there was huge investment from London in railways, mines, sheep and cattle ranches and meat canneries. Uruguay, for example, had sent the Allies in France in the First World war over 250 million tins of bully beef.

Hore most capably sets out some of the complex structure encountered in tri-service command in the Middle East in 1940-1943 with particular regard to the political and strategic aspects of the effort to drive Axis forces out of North Africa, with its huge Allied supply line, much of it routed around the Cape. Of course, there was inter-service rivalry and the Staffs in London with which he had also to contend. As one with family ties to each of the Royal Navy and the Army of this theatre this reviewer found these chapters particularly relevant especially as he had heard handed down many of the stories of the time.

In early summer of 1943 he was due to be appointed Second-in-Command of the Eastern Fleet but ill health, most likely stress-related, followed and after a year’s sick leave he was appointed vice-admiral and Commander, Orkneys and Shetlands. After a short retirement he died in 1950 at the comparatively young age of 62.

No fewer than 15 pages of sources are provided indicating considerable depth of research by the author who gives six further pages of bibliography for additional reading.

Peter Hore has been given exclusive and unique access to the extensive Harwood family archives and, in the light of these previously unpublished papers, has set about rehabilitating the character, career and achievements of this great British admiral.

Hore is a former Head of Defence Studies for the Royal Navy. He is the author of numerous books, and is currently Associate Editor of Warships: International Fleet Review. He is also a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and Vice-President of the Royal Naval Museum. He recently edited Nelson’s Band of Brothers for Pen & Sword.

Reviewed by Africa Ports & Ships London Correspondent, Paul Ridgway.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

CYCLONE RAPIDLY FORMING OVER NORTHERN MOZAMBIQUE CHANNEL

Tropical Cyclone 18S has formed over the northern Mozambique Channel and is expected to turn and track southeastward. Image: JTWC, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Tropical Cyclone 18S has formed over the northern Mozambique Channel and is expected to turn and track southeastward. Image: JTWC

Tropical Cyclone 18S, which we reported on in an earlier news report CYCLONE HALEH CONTINUES TO WEAKEN BUT NEW STORM IN MOZ CHANNEL THREATENS, is developing into a full cyclone in the Mozambique Channel following a weather system that arrived off the landmass of northern Mozambique and central inland Africa before moving offshore and intensifying as it moves over the warm waters of the Mozambique Channel.

This was previously been noted as a potential cyclone and earlier today (06h00, Saturday 9 March) Cyclone 18S (as yet not named) was in position near 17.0S 40.2E, approximately 312 n. miles north of Europa Island (French weather station) in southern Mozambique Channel.

As it arrives over the ocean the tropical storm system is consolidating, currently with 25-30 knot winds gusting to 35 knots. Although the storm system is still tracking eastwards at 12 knots towards northern Madagascar, it is expected to slow and turn south-eastwards as a subtropical ridge builds to the south. This will lead to a slow and possibly stationary track motion but it will then accelerate west-south-westward toward Mozambique.

At that stage the winds are expected to have reached a peak intensity of 115 knots with a maximum wave height of 10 feet (3 metres). After reaching the land the cyclone is likely to weaken rapidly over Mozambique.

CYCLONE HALEH 17S

Tropical Cyclone Haleh (17S) in mid-Indian Ocean is weakening as it tracks southwestwards into cooler waters. At 03h00 Saturday morning (9 March) the cyclone was in position near 35.3S 65.0E approximately 1,000 nautical miles south-southeast of Mauritius, with winds of 35 knots gusting to 45 knots. Wave height was at 31 feet.

As Haleh moves deeper into colder waters the Joint Typhoon Warning Center will no longer issue reports on this cyclone but will continue to closely monitor the system in case of regeneration.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

LUCKY ESCAPE FOR NORWEGIAN ESCAPE

Norwegian Escape, Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Norwegian Escape

Passengers on board the 164,600-gt cruise ship NORWEGIAN ESCAPE had an unexpected mid-ocean as they relaxed over their drinks and other activities earlier this week, with the ship gliding through the waters of the east coast of the United States.

The ship had sailed from New York on a cruise to the Caribbean when on Sunday night and without any warning the ship suddenly began to heel over to one side.

What was at first a curious affair quickly became alarming as the list worsened and resulted in furniture sliding across the floor and bottles and glasses falling off the shelves in the bars, crashing onto the floor.

What had happened was that the giant ship, with a passenger capacity of almost 4300 people plus 1700 crew had been struck by an unexpected 115 mph wind gust.

There had been no prior warning and although the gust of wind was the equivalent speed of those in a category 3 hurricane, this came seemingly out of nowhere and moved on just as suddenly, leaving behind a shipload of nervous passengers and a vessel rocking in the water as it regained an even keel.

Reports said that a few passengers and crew had been injured as a result of the sudden drama. The wind blast lasted less than 30 seconds after which things rapidly returned to normal, but with plenty of cleaning up to do by the crew.

Norwegian Escape, which was built in 2015, suffered no damage to the vessel but it was noted that about a dozen ambulances were on the dockside at Port Canaveral when the ship docked on Tuesday morning.

In a statement NCL said the ship had encountered a gust of wind of about 100 knots. Those passengers and crew who were injured received immediate treatment by the medical staff on board the vessel. The ship remained fully operational and was able to resume her voyage from Port Canaveral on schedule. The ship will return to New York on Sunday.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

14th PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP MISSION: STRENGTHENING TIES IN THE INDO-PACIFIC REGION

Seen here the Military Sealift Command (MSC) expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Brunswick (T-EPF 6) departs Naval Base Guam, passing USNS Fall River (T-EPF 4) and marking the start of Pacific Partnership 2019. Pacific Partnership, the 14th exercise in a series is the largest annual multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific region. Each year the mission team works collectively with host and partner nations to enhance regional interoperability and disaster response capabilities, increase security and stability in the region, and foster new and enduring friendships in the Indo-Pacific. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Carpenter/Released, USN ©, Freatured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Seen here the Military Sealift Command (MSC) expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Brunswick (T-EPF 6) departs Naval Base Guam, passing USNS Fall River (T-EPF 4) and marking the start of Pacific Partnership 2019. Pacific Partnership, the 14th exercise in a series is the largest annual multinational humanitarian assistance and disaster relief preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific region. Each year the mission team works collectively with host and partner nations to enhance regional interoperability and disaster response capabilities, increase security and stability in the region, and foster new and enduring friendships in the Indo-Pacific. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Carpenter/Released, USN ©

Enhancement of disaster response cooperation

On 4 March the (US) Commander, Logistics Group Western Pacific Public Affairs reported from Singapore that the US Navy was about to join allied and partner nation forces for the 14th Pacific Partnership mission commencing that day.

This annual maritime operation will help improve disaster response preparedness, resiliency and capacity while enhancing partnerships with participating nations and civilian humanitarian organizations throughout the Indo-Pacific.

Pacific Partnership is the largest annual, multilateral disaster response preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific.

Multi-national participants

This year’s mission will be led by Commander, Destroyer Squadron 1, embarked in the expeditionary fast transport ships…

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

THE GROWING DEBATE ON SCRUBBERS: YARA SAYS KEEP OPTIONS OPEN

Yara Marine scrubber in the workshop, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Yara Marine scrubber in the workshop

A growing number of countries and regions around the world are introducing bans on open loop scrubbers that utilise seawater in the exhaust cleaning process. What are the ambitions behind the bans, what are the consequences for stakeholders along the entire value chain, and what are the options? The debate is open.

“Some studies have shown that open loop bans have no real environmental impact, while others maintain that the effects of wash water on marine life have yet to be assessed or may even be harmful,” says R&D Manager Shyam Thapa of Yara Marine Technologies.

Regardless, he says, there are different reasons for…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

PORT ELIZABETH TANKER BERTH REPAIRS PROGRESSING WELL, SAYS TNPA

The blue ship near the port entrace is on the affected tanker berth. Picture: TNPA, Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
The blue ship near the port entrace is at the affected tanker berth.     Picture: TNPA

Repairs to the Port Elizabeth tanker berth in the harbour is progressing well, according to a TNPA statement just issued.

Readers will be reminded that an announcement was made several weeks ago that the berth was being taken out of commission pending necessary repairs. Adequate arrangements had been made to ensure that PE motorists and other users of fuel would not be inconvenienced during the shutdown.

The berth has been closed since 18 February 2019 for repairs to the corroded steel structures supporting the berth’s access walkway. The berth is planned to re-open once it has been recertified by the structural engineer, targeted for 25 March 2019.

The repairs entail strengthening of the vertical columns by installation of additional vertical I-sections connected to the existing steel piles. The new I-sections will be bolted at intervals on either side of the flanges for the full length of each pile. A total of nine columns will be strengthened both above and below the water.

“TNPA is very pleased with the progress that the contractor has made, despite some delays experienced due to weather conditions affecting the ability to complete underwater works,” said port manager Rajesh Dana.

“Our weekly meetings with the oil companies have ensured that they are kept abreast of progress. This enabled them to keep measure of their stock in the port, thus ensuring that the promise made to the public of uninterrupted fuel supply to Nelson Mandela Bay during the shutdown is kept.”

Siganeko Magafela of the South African Petroleum Industry Association, said: that SAPIA can confirm that the closure of the berth has resulted in no negative impact to the fuel supply into Nelson Mandela Bay. “The oil companies have ensured that contingencies were in place to deliver continual supply to the region.”

Dana commended the manner in which the oil companies have supported TNPA in its work to ensure that the tanker berth complies with the required safety standards for optimum operation. He added his assurance that the repairs were receiving priority attention from TNPA and the contractor would endeavour earlier completion if possible, considering unpredictability of weather conditions.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

MORE SHIPOWNERS JOIN CSA 2020 IN SUPPORT OF EXHAUST GAS CLEANING SYSTEMS

Wallenius Wilhelmsen car carrier Tortugas in Durban harbour. Picture: Trevor Jones, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Wallenius Wilhelmsen car carrier Tortugas in Durban harbour.    Picture: Trevor Jones

Wallenius Wilhelmsen is the latest shipowner to join the Clean Shipping Alliance 2020 (CSA 2020), increasing the organisation’s membership to 35 shipowners operating a combined fleet of almost 2500 vessels.

Other companies to have recently joined the Alliance include Hammonia Reederei, International Seaways, Chandris (Hellas) and Genco Shipping & Trading.

Roger Strevens, Vice President, Global Sustainability, Wallenius Wilhelmsen, said: that the implementation of the IMO 2020 0.5% global sulphur cap is supported by the company, but it does represent a…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

CYCLONE HALEH CONTINUES TO WEAKEN BUT NEW STORM IN MOZ CHANNEL THREATENS

Image: Joint Typhoon Warning Center, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Image:   Joint Typhoon Warning Center

In the most recent update available on Tropical Cyclone Haleh, situated now at position 25.1S 68.1E approximately 669 nautical miles east-southeast of Port Louis, Mauritius, the storm is continuing to track in a south-southwestward direction at 9 knots.

Maximum wind speeds are recorded as 70 knots, gusting to 85 knots and the maximum wave height is 26 feet.

Cyclone Haleh is forecast to continue weakening as it tracks towards the south-southwest over the the coming 24 hours.

New possible Tropical Storm

A new tropical storm is ‘brewing’ in the Mozambique Channel close to the coast of central Mozambique, identified at present as 98S. No further details are available at present (Thursday 06h00) but the storm will require watching.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

PORT OF NGQURA CONTAINER TERMINAL WELCOMES ANOTHER BIG SHIP

MSC Bettina on her berth at Ngqura Container Terminal, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
MSC Bettina on her berth at Ngqura Container Terminal

The Ngqura Container Terminal, which is operated by Transnet Port Terminals (TPT,) has just handled yet another big ship.

The vessel, MSC BETTINA arrived on Sunday, 24 February 2019 where TPT was engaged with loading and off-loading 2,697 TEUs (twenty foot container equivalent units).

MSC Bettina is registered under the flag of Panama and has…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

SOMALILAND BUILDING A STRATEGIC ROAD LINKING BERBERA WITH ETHIOPIA

Port of Berbera. Picture: Wikipedia, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Port of Berbera.     Picture: Wikipedia

A new strategically important US$400 million road is to be built linking Somaliland’s Berbera port with Ethiopia has been launched, it was reported this week.

According to the Africa Daily Voice, the road is being built jointly by both countries with the aim of providing a reliable road linking…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

PIRACY AND DRUG SMUGGLING CONTINUES TO CHALLENGE NAVIES

Nigerian pirates attack tanker underway off Lagos, reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

There has been another pirate attack on a ship in the Gulf of Guinea. According to the IMB Piracy Reporting Centre (PRC) armed pirates on board a speed boat chased and succeeded in boarding a tanker that was underway in position 04:30.57N – 03:14.30E, which is around 113 nautical miles south of Lagos, Nigeria.

This particular incident took place on 2 March at 12h25 UTC. After sounding the alarm the crew of the tanker took refuge in the vessel’s citadel.

On receiving the message of this attack the IMB Piracy Reporting Centre immediately informed the Nigerian authorities.

The Nigerian Navy responded by sending out a patrol boat which on arrival found the pirates to have departed. After boarding the tanker the navy was able to confirm that all crew were safe and unharmed.

The tanker, which has not been identified by the authorities, subsequently continued her voyage.

Another drug haul by the Dragon

HMS Dragon off the island of Tristan da Cunha, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
HMS Dragon off the island of Tristan da Cunha

Over on the other side of the continent, in the Arabian Sea the Royal Navy Type 45 destroyer HMS DRAGON has made its 6th drug haul in three months.

This came about after the naval ship intercepted and stopped a dhow that was found to be carrying over two tons of hashish. A few days earlier the ship made another seizure of 49 kilos of heroin.

The dhow, which was spotted at sea during a night-time sortie by the ship’s Wildcat helicopter. The ship was directed to the scene to take a closer look and on approaching the dhow HMS Dragon launched two sea boats, each with a boarding team of sailors and marines, to board the dhow and conduct a search.

After questioning the master and crew of the dhow, during which suspicions were aroused, the officer in charge decided to carry out a full search of the vessel, during which the 2,000kgs of hashish was discovered.

After documenting the haul the navy destroyed the narcotics before returning to patrolling as part of Combined Task Force 150, a multinational group which works to disrupt piracy, drug smuggling and terrorism.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

POSITIVE RESULTS REPORTED BY GRINDROD

Port Maputo, featured ith Grindrod results for 2018 and appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Port Maputo

Earlier today (Wednesday 6 March) Grindrod released its final results for the year ended 31 December 2018, saying that renewed focus on Freight Services, following Shipping’s spin-off in June 2018, has yielded positive results for the Durban-headquartered group.

Furthermore, while its repositioning is ongoing, earnings growth generated by Financial Services is pleasing.

Performance from continuing operations – Freight and Financial services

Earnings from continuing operations for the year ended 31 December 2018 are R803.4 million, an increase of 24% compared to earnings of R646.3 million achieved in 2017. Headline earnings from continuing operations are R716.6 million compared to headline earnings of R570.8 million achieved…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

NSRI PORT ELIZABETH CALL OUT TO ASSIST WITH SHARK-BITE VICTIM

NSRI Station 6 rescue craft Spirit of Toft, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
NSRI Station 6 rescue craft Spirit of Toft

The National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) Port Elizabeth Station 6 was called out yesterday to an unusual incident; that of assisting a shark bite victim on a fishing trawler.

Justin Erasmus, NSRI Port Elizabeth deputy station commander reported that at 16h00 yesterday (Tuesday 5 March) the station duty crew were placed on alert following reports from a fishing trawler at the fishing grounds 30 nautical miles off-shore of Port Elizabeth.

It turned out that a 46 year old Cape Town fisherman onboard the trawler had sustained shark bite lacerations to his left forearm and left upper arm during attempts to release a 2.5 metre shark that had been caught in their fishing nets and hauled aboard.

While the fisherman received urgent assistance from some of the crew, others managed to free the shark which was released alive back into the sea.

An alarm was raised as the trawler began heading towards Port Elizabeth.

Once the trawler had arrived in a position closer to Port Elizabeth some four nautical miles offshore, and in rough conditions, the NSRI Station 6 launched its rescue craft Spirit of Toft and, accompanied by a Eastern Cape Government Health EMC rescue paramedic, headed out to rendezvous with the trawler.

On arrival a NSRI rescue swimmer was transferred across onto the trawler where the injured fisherman, described as ‘walking wounded’, and bandaged by his fellow crew, was transferred onto the Spirit of Toft where medical treatment by the paramedic for his injuries could commence.

Meanwhile, the NSRI rescue craft headed to shore and once back at the base the injured man was transported by ambulance to hospital in a stable condition for further treatment.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

WOMEN IN MARITIME, IMO’S GENDER PROGRAMME

IMO Women in Maritime banner, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

World Maritime Day 2019

​”Empowering Women in the Maritime Community” has been selected as the World Maritime Day theme for 2019.

This provides an opportunity to raise awareness of the importance of gender equality, in line with the SDGs, and to highlight the important contribution of women all over the world to the maritime sector, says the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

Throughout the year, IMO syas it will work with various maritime stakeholders towards achieving the SDGs, particularly SDG 5, to help create an environment in which women are identified and selected for career development opportunities in maritime administrations, ports and maritime training institutes and to encourage more conversation for gender equality in the maritime space.

Today, women represent only two percent of the world’s 1.2 million seafarers and 94 percent of female seafarers are working in the cruise industry. Within this historically male dominated industry, IMO has been making a concerted effort to help the industry move forward and support women to achieve a representation that is in keeping with twenty-first century expectations.

Within the framework of maritime development, and through its Women in Maritime programme, under the slogan: “Training-Visibility-Recognition”, IMO says it has taken a strategic approach towards enhancing the contribution of women as key maritime stakeholders. IMO continues to support the participation of women in both shore-based and sea-going posts.

IMO is strongly committed to helping its Member States achieve the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goal 5 “Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls”.

IMO’s gender programme was initiated in 1988. At that time, only a few maritime training institutes opened their doors to female students. Since then, IMO’s gender and capacity-building programme has helped put in place an institutional framework to incorporate a gender dimension into IMO’s policies and procedures.

This has supported access to maritime training and employment opportunities for women in the maritime sector. source: IMO

Video message from the IMO Secretary-General, Kitack Lim, raises awareness of the importance of gender equality [3:02]

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

REFURBISHMENT OF MOSSEL BAY PORT ADMIN BUILDING UNDERWAY

Port of Mossel Bay, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Port of Mossel Bay

A new contractor has been appointed by Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) to conclude the extension of the Port of Mossel Bay’s administration building.

The project, valued at approximately R16 million is expected to be completed during the second half of 2020.

Construction initially began in September 2015 but stalled due to performance issues with the original contractor. The previous contract was cancelled and…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

MOZAMBIQUE SAYS EU LACKS TRANSPARENCY IN TUNA FISHING NEGOTIATIONS

Flag of Mozambique, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

Mozambique’s Minister of Fisheries Agostinho Mondlane says there is a lack of transparency from the European Union (EU) over national-waters tuna fishery negotiations.

Interviewed in the newspaper Noticias Mondlane said: “We feel that there is a willingness of the EU to perpetuate into the fourth generation agreement a lack of transparency. We think we can discuss this with any other bloc, but never with the EU, which is a community governed by rules of good governance.”

He said the EU has rejected a clause on…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

DISCOVERING OUR UNIVERSE – SHARE YOUR VIEWS

Günther Hasinger, ESA Director of Science, is inviting the public to share their views on the questions that Voyage 2050, ESA’s space science programme for the 2035–2050 time frame, should address. This public consultation opened on 4 March and will run until the end of June. This is the first time that ESA has invited the public to be involved in this process. The survey requires no expert knowledge about space science topics, and has been specially prepared to guide participants through a sequence of questions. Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Günther Hasinger, ESA Director of Science, is inviting the public to share their views on the questions that Voyage 2050, ESA’s space science programme for the 2035–2050 time frame, should address. This public consultation opened on 4 March and will run until the end of June. This is the first time that ESA has invited the public to be involved in this process. The survey requires no expert knowledge about space science topics, and has been specially prepared to guide participants through a sequence of questions.

 

How did our Milky Way galaxy form?

    How do black holes grow?

        What is the origin of our Solar System?

            Are there other worlds capable of hosting life?

These are some of the questions the European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) current science missions are designed to address.

But what do you think are the most important questions that our future missions should tackle?

Now is your chance to tell ESA. This invitation was issued by the Agency on Monday, 4 March.

Günther Hasinger, ESA Director of Science, is inviting the public to share their views on the questions that Voyage 2050, ESA’s space science programme for the 2035–2050 time frame, should address. This public consultation opened on 4 March and will run until the end of June 2019.

This is the first time that ESA invites the public to be involved in this process, it is reported.

In the words of Director Hasinger: “Our missions are funded by the Member States, and that means their citizens. We wish to encourage a sense of ownership and involvement in the space science programme with our public, and so we want to hear everyone’s views and choose our next set of missions in an open and transparent way.”

The survey requires no expert knowledge about space science topics, and has been specially prepared to guide participants through a sequence of questions.

Consultation each decade

Every decade or so, ESA consults with the Europe’s science community to plan the future of its science programme. The current plan, Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, which covers a series of missions that will be launched and operated between now and the early 2030s, arose from a consultation with Europe’s scientists that began in 2005.

The Cosmic Vision missions will investigate profound questions about the nature and origin of our Solar System and the Universe as a whole.

Innovative space science missions can take up to 20 years from concept through development and launch to the production of scientific results.

The pioneering Rosetta mission, which was launched in 2004 to rendezvous with Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and drop a lander on its surface in 2014, had its roots in the Horizon 2000 programme, an even earlier plan that was initiated in the 1980s.

Although it may seem far in the future, it is already time to start planning beyond the current horizon, for the decades up to 2050, we have been told by ESA.

Enterprising outlook

This forward-looking perspective is crucial for Europe, as it provides the confidence and common goals for the sustained collaborative efforts of scientists, engineers, industry and funding agencies over many decades.

Long-term strategic planning also ensures the continued development of innovative technology while at the same time advancing Europe’s research expertise across wide-ranging scientific fields.

Concluded Hasinger: “This consultation represents an exciting opportunity for European space science.

“We will be looking at what we can accomplish in the future, and that means we particularly encourage young people to share their views. After all, they are the ones who will work on and benefit from these missions.”

For more information
To take part in this public consultation readers are invited to take a look by: CLICKING HERE

Everyone over 16 years of age worldwide is invited to participate. There are no nationality restrictions.

As a means of saying thank you for taking part in the survey, participants can opt to be included in a monthly draw for a gift voucher throughout the duration of the public consultation.

A parallel consultation with Europe’s scientific community to prepare for Voyage 2050 is currently underway.

For further information readers are invited to contact:
Luigi Colangeli
Head of the Science Coordination Office
Directorate of Science
European Space Agency
Email: luigi.colangeli@esa.int

Fabio Favata
Head of the Strategy, Planning and Coordination Office
Directorate of Science
European Space Agency
Email: fabio.favata@esa.int

Markus Bauer
ESA Science Programme Communication Officer
Tel: +31 71 565 6799
Mob: +31 61 594 3 954
Email: markus.bauer@esa.int

……………………..

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

DoT TO LAUNCH INTERIM SECTOR DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL IN JUNE

delegates to the Maritime Sector Dialogue meeting held in Durban, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

Delegates to the two day maritime sector transport dialogue held in Durban last week endorsed the setting up of a proposed development council for the sector, possibly as early June 2019. (See report in yesterday’s News.)

This emerged at the closure of the event by Transport Minister, Dr Blade Nzimande at about lunchtime on Friday, following to two days of deliberation by a large number of delegates representing government, the private sector as well as academia.

According to Dr Nzimande, the establishment of the development council for the maritime economic sector is a proposal emanating from the adoption and implementation of the Comprehensive Maritime Transport Policy (CMTP) in 2017.

Key component in government’s objective

In his opening address on the first day, Dr Nzimande said the maritime transport sector was a…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

SHIPS DELAYED AT CAPE TOWN BECAUSE OF NO PILOT BOAT

Picture of Port of Cape Town, by TNPA, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Port of Cape Town.   Picture: TNPA

Ship movements at the Port of Cape Town were delayed yesterday due to the lack of a pilot boat.

According to Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA, Port of Cape Town, the pilot boat was “out of commission”. A spokesman said that all efforts were being made to ensure that no delays occurred at this time .

“We shall continue to monitor improvement and notify you when the craft is available,” the spokesman said.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL MOOTED TO DEVELOP AND TRANSFORM THE MARITIME SECTOR

The establishment of a Maritime Transport Sector Development Council may be one critical intervention necessary as a platform and vehicle to develop concrete strategies and co-operation to develop and transform the sector, South Africa’s Transport Minister Dr Blade Nzimande has announced.

Dr Blade Nzimande, SA Minister of Transport, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Dr Blade Nzimande, SA Minister of Transport

He was addressing hundreds of delegates attending the Department of Transport’s two-day dialogue on maritime sector transport in Durban. These include government, private sector and academia representatives from across the country.

According to Dr Nzimande the Council would also be expected to develop appropriate plans to grow the sector within the context of the oceans economy.

The proposal was coming against the backdrop of the introduction of the Comprehensive Maritime Transport Policy (CMTP) in 2017 aimed at…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

CORPORATISATION OF TNPA IS ON THE CARDS, SAYS TRANSPORT MINISTER

Maritime transport sector in for a shake-up: Transport Ministry

Includes the possible corporatisation of the Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA), featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Includes the possible corporatisation of the Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA)

South Africa’s maritime transport sector is poised for a significant shake-up and shape-up phase over the next few years including the possible corporatisation of the Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA), says transport minister Dr Blade Nzimande.

Other developments include the establishment of innovation hubs, reconfiguration of maritime education and training as well as a push towards domestication of local shipping trade transport occurring along the country’s coastal areas.

Dr Nzimande was presenting an address to delegates to the country’s inaugural maritime transport sector dialogue held in Durban on Thursday and Friday last week.

The focus of the dialogue was on the maritime transport sector and was the first in a series planned for the country’s transport industry over the next few months and years.

Guiding focus of the maritime transport sector dialogue was the recently promulgated Comprehensive Maritime Transport Policy (CMTP), a product of the National Transport Masterplan (NATMAP) 2050, aimed at facilitating collective pursuit and achievement of maritime sector economic development targets, of which some were set under the country’s Operation Phakisa: Ocean’s Economy programme for the next decade.

Grow & Develop the South African maritime transport sector

Among other things, the CMTP requires the Department of Transport to ‘initiate programmes to holistically and coherently grow and develop the South African maritime transport sector.’

On Thursday in Durban, Dr Nzimande who celebrated his first full year as Minister of Transport in February, said several proposals towards fulfillment of the goal were on the table for consideration. Among these was the setting up soon of a Maritime Transport Sector Development Council (MTSD), a development delegates to the dialogue have since endorsed.

He said the council may be up and running by June 2019, even if on an interim basis pending finalisation of its member composition and related matters.

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) corporatisation

Also on the cards is a contemplated corporatisation of the country’s ports management entity, the Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA), with a view to unlocking vast economic opportunities identified within the country’s ports area of contribution and influence.

Announcing this to applause, Dr Nzimande said “The present policy and legislation of government requires that we corporatise the Transnet National Ports Authority. I will be tasking the National Ports Consultative Committee to advise me on the steps to be undertaken to implement this crucial piece of legislation.

“I know that there is a debate (about this) because there are some people who are not wild about this idea. But a debate is good.”

He said this would take place against the backdrop of recognition that the country’s ports regulator was already doing a sterling job in creating a conducive and investor friendly environment at the ports, and also helping to reduce costs of doing business in the economic zones.

For Dr Nzimande’s remarks on the topic, Click on the 3 minutes video below

Transport Innovation Hubs

The minister said another crucial intervention would be the establishment of transport innovation hubs to facilitate the harnessing of talent and skills in the development of solutions to the country’s transport sector, inclusive of the maritime sector.

Describing this as something ‘very close to my heart’, Dr Nzimande said: “I am really committed into investing in having transport innovation hubs. We are not going to transform the transport sector generally, or any mode of transport, without investment into science, technology and innovation.”

Illustrating the particular importance of this aspect of development, Dr Nzimande drew an example about the country’s rail transport and said it was inconceivable that in modern times, trains in South Africa were still colliding randomly on railways when transport mobility technology had so advanced such that such collisions should be history.

He said the innovations hubs would facilitate the promotion and harnessing of science, technology and innovation ideas for deployment in areas of transport to help improve both functionality as well as efficient services. He said he would set up a task team to explore and pursue the idea towards implementation.

Focused Education, Training and Skills Transfer

On education and training, Dr Nzimande said empowerment and transformation in the sector was proving futile in the absence of proper and relevant education, training and skills transfer.

He said black economic empowerment was meaningless if it was limited only to shareholding while those sought to be empowered knew next to nothing about managing and understanding businesses in the maritime economic sector.

Towards addressing the situation, Dr Nzimande said his department would engage with various role-players inclusive of the Department of Higher Education and Training, with a view to establishing a dedicated education, training and skills development focus for the sector.

For his remarks on this aspect, Click on the video below:

Domestication of Shipping and Localisation of Content

Dr Nzimande also reflected on a number of issues inclusive of the need for a South Africa owned fleet of shipping vessels, as well as an increase in local content in the boat and ships repair and manufacturing subsectors.

On development of locally owned or registered ships, Dr Nzimande said coastal shipping could be supported in various ways inclusive of local mining output, but also the shifting some of the road transported goods onto ships that would service the southern African region.

With regards utilisation of local content in ship repair and manufacturing, he said empowerment through shareholding by South Africans in operations that were importing goods that could be manufactured locally actually amounted to dis-empowerment as such schemes derived no meaningful and sustainable benefits for the local economy. source: SAMSA

Video 1 [2:51] On Corporatisation of Transnet

Video 2 [1:33] On Skills Development

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

NEWS FROM ESA: METHANE AND OZONE DATA PRODUCTS FROM COPERNICUS SENTINEL-5P

Global methane. Thanks to the mission’s spatial resolution of 7 x 7 km and global coverage every 24 hours, methane emissions can be mapped on regional scales and also for larger point sources. These data are now available to the user community. Picture credit: Released 04/03/2019 5:50 pm; Copyright contains modified Copernicus data (2018–19), processed by SRON. ESA © Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Global methane. Thanks to the mission’s spatial resolution of 7 x 7 km and global coverage every 24 hours, methane emissions can be mapped on regional scales and also for larger point sources. These data are now available to the user community. Picture credit: Released 04/03/2019 5:50 pm; Copyright contains modified Copernicus data (2018–19), processed by SRON. ESA ©

It was reported yesterday (4 March) that the ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission has been used to produce global maps of two atmospheric gases responsible for making our world warmer: methane, which is a particularly potent greenhouse gas, and ozone, which is a greenhouse gas and a pollutant in the lower part of the atmosphere.

The maps shown here give insight into where these gases are coming from.

Launched in October 2017, Sentinel-5P is the first Copernicus satellite dedicated to monitoring our atmosphere. It carries an advanced multispectral imaging spectrometer called Tropomi to image a wide range of air pollutants more accurately and at a higher spatial resolution than ever before.

Prior to making data available to the public, scientists…

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London.

Global tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric ozone between January 2018 and January 2019 measured by the Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission. Ozone lower down in the atmosphere – in the troposphere – is an air pollutant and a greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. It is difficult to measure because of its short lifespan and because concentrations can vary hugely from place to place. The unprecedented spatial resolution offered by Copernicus Sentinel-5P’s Tropomi instrument means that the complex relationship between tropospheric ozone and climate can be better understood. Released 04/03/2019 5:50 pm; Copyright contains modified Copernicus data (2018–19), processed by DLR. ESA © Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Global tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric ozone between January 2018 and January 2019 measured by the Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission. Ozone lower down in the atmosphere – in the troposphere – is an air pollutant and a greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. It is difficult to measure because of its short lifespan and because concentrations can vary hugely from place to place. The unprecedented spatial resolution offered by Copernicus Sentinel-5P’s Tropomi instrument means that the complex relationship between tropospheric ozone and climate can be better understood. Released 04/03/2019 5:50 pm; Copyright contains modified Copernicus data (2018–19), processed by DLR. ESA ©

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

CYCLONE HALEH 17S UPDATE

Cyclone Haleh Indian Ocean 4 March 2019, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Cyclone Haleh 4 March 2019

The tropical cyclone codenamed HALEH 17s in the mid-Indian Ocean is continuing to track south-southwestward at a speed of 8 knots.

At 15h00 yesterday Monday the cyclone was in position near 18.9S 72.5E approximately 870 nautical miles east of Port Louis, Mauritius.

The report of the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre (JTWC) has the cyclone with a wind intensity estimated at 105 knots. “The environment is favourable with excellent poleward outflow, low (10-15 knots) vertical wind shear, and warm (28-29 Celsius) sea surface temperature.”

JTWC is forecasting that the present track of the storm will gradually shift from southwestward to southward wit a supportive environment and the intensity remaining at 100 knots or greater through that period.

As cooler sea temperatures are encountered the cyclone will steadily weaken, falling later to 55 knots.

The maximum wave height at present is given as 43 feet (13+ metres).

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

DRILLING AT THE PROVEN BRULPADDA SITE OFF MOSSEL BAY TO RESUME IN DECEMBER

The rig Deepsea Stavanger made the initial discovery off Mossel Bay, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
The rig Deepsea Stavanger made the initial discovery

Following the successful discovery of gas and light oil at the Brulpadda field 180km offshore of Mossel Bay, the partners involved in the project headed by Total intend resuming drilling operations in December this year.

The rig Deepsea Stavanger drilled a single well to a depth of 3,633 metres before striking gas condensate and some light oils. Total said afterwards that the next step would involve acquiring 3D seismic data before commencing the drilling of possibly another four exploration wells at…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

NEW DEEPWATER WATERWAY INTO ABIDJAN HARBOUR IS OPENED FOR SHIPPING

Abidjan Container Terminal, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Abidjan Container Terminal

Access to the Ivory Coast port of Abidjan for deep-draught ships is now possible with the opening of a new waterway.

This follows the completion of the widened and deepened Vridi Canal that connects the port with the Atlantic via the Ebrié Lagoon.

Construction of the canal has been carried out by China Harbor Engineering Company over a three-year period.

As a result of the new waterway ships with a draught of 16 metres and a container capacity of 10,000 (loaded) containers will now be able to call at the port.

Vridi Canal and Abidjan, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

Prior to this the port could handled container ships with a 3,500 TEU capacity and 12 metre draught.

This doesn’t mean the end of construction going on within Abidjan port. A second container terminal which will involve Bolloré in its operation, will be completed in 2020 but there are additional projects in store for the port of Abidjan including a new car terminal and anothr for cereals and the modernisation of the port’s fruit and mineral ore terminals.

The cost of these projects is reported to be in excess of EUR 1.5 billion of which 85% is being financed by the state throug a loan from China’s Exim Bank. source: International Transport Journal

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

FRENCH MISTRAL-CLASS HELICOPTER CARRIER TO VISIT THE CAPE DURING ANNUAL MISSION

FS Tonnerre arriving in Durban harbour, May 2010. Picture by Clinton Wyness, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
FS Tonnerre arriving in Durban harbour, May 2010. Picture by Clinton Wyness

The Mistral-class helicopter carrier FS TONNERRE, accompanied by the frigate FS LA FAYETTE, will be calling at either Cape Town or the SA Navy base of Simon’s Town as they perform the French Navy’s annual Jeanne d’Arc long-range mission.

The navy’s annual Jeanne d’Arc mission involves a task group spending five months on…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

MOZAMBIQUE FILES LAWSUIT AGAINST CREDIT SUISSE, PRIVINVEST AND THREE EX-PRIVINVEST EMPLOYEES

Some of the EMATUM fishing fleet, which has all but crippled a sovereign nation, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Some of the EMATUM fishing fleet, which has all but crippled a sovereign nation

News that broke at the weekend on Twitter says that Mozambique has filed a lawsuit against Swiss banking firm Credit Suisse, Mozambique firm Privinvest and three former employees of the latter company.

The lawsuit has been lodged in the High Court of Justice, Queen’s Bench Division, Commercial Court in London.

The Twitter report comes from the Mozambique NGO Centre of Public Integrity (CIP).

According to the CIP Facebook page, the lawsuit is against the main creditor of the hidden debts, Credit Suisse International, Credit Suisse AG, its former employees involved in the debts, Surjan Singh, Andrew Pearse and Deltina Subeva. It is also against the main suppliers of military and tuna fishing equipment, Privinvest Shipbuilding, Abu Dhabi Mar, Logistics International Investments.

The case relates to the ongoing enquiry into the EMATUM fishing fleet and patrol boats that were built in France for a mystery company in Mozambique on the pretext that the country could take charge of its own tuna fishing instead of having foreign tuna fleets operating at will off the Mozambique coast.

It later transpired that mystery people within the Mozambique security services were involved, as were various individuals, including the three named above. The size of the debt that accrued all but crippled Mozambique which had accepted surety for this.

Recently a number of arrests have been made in the US by the authorities there who are also seeking the extradition of Mozambique’s former finance minister, Manuel Chang, who was detained in Johannesburg by the South African authorities at the request of the Americans. Chang now awaits a decision by the Kempton Park Magistrate’s Court in South Africa whether to extradite him to the United States, where he is wanted on charges of fraud and bribery, or as has been requested by Mozambique, to his own country where he also faces arrest.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

HAPAG-LLOYD HITS NIGERIAN IMPORTERS WITH US$700 BOX FEE

German container carrier Hapag-Lloyd intends increasing its freight rate on 15 March 2019 with the inclusion of a US$700 peak season surcharge on containers headed for Tin Can Island and Apapa ports in Lagos.Hapag-Lloyd has advised that…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

TEMA’S NEW CONTAINER TERMINAL MEANS LAYOFFS AT THE INLAND CONTAINER DEPOTS, SAYS GHANA PORTS AUTHORITY

What Tema's new container terminal will look like when completed, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
What Tema’s new container terminal will look like when completed

The director general of Ghana Ports and Harbours Authority is reported to have confirmed that 1,200 freight handlers at Ghana’s inland container depots will be out of a job later this year.

This will follow the container terminal at the Port of Tema which is to be…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

CYCLONE HALEH THREATENS MID INDIAN OCEAN

image: JTWC, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
image: JTWC

Tropical Cyclone Haleh (TC17S) has developed in the mid-Indian Ocean region and although the storm is not currently threatening Mauritius or Madagascar, the islands in the mid ocean region south of Chagos (Diego Garcia) are in the wider area affected affected and the situation will need to be watched by shipping whose intended path crosses that of the storm.

The position on Sunday 3 March at 12h00 was given by the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre (JTWC) as being 15.9S 73.6E which is…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

CAPESPAN’S THE LOGISTICS GROUP READY TO EXPAND FACILITIES TO THE FRESH FRUIT EXPORT SECTOR

Port of Maputo, which TLG is considering making greater use of for fresh fruit exports, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Port of Maputo, which TLG is considering making greater use of for fresh fruit exports

Capespan, the multinational fresh fruit producer and marketer, says that The Logistics Group (TLG) – its new logistics organisation announced earlier this month, is ready to expand facilities to the fresh fruit export sector.

Tonie Fuchs, Managing Director of Capespan Group, explained that Capespan’s global fruit production and marketing businesses remain the core focus within the Capespan Group, while its logistics businesses is being consolidated into TLG to ensure a focus-based approach to increased logistical service levels across a broader spectrum of product capabilities and capacity.

“The logistics business in TLG will continue to be managed by Capespan’s current logistics management team, led by retiring CEO Dawie Ferreira, who will be handing over to incumbent CEO Anton Potgieter over the next six months.

“Dawie Ferreira has been at the helm for many years and instrumental in the Division’s diversification drive. Anton Potgieter brings a fresh, hands-on perspective to this highly experienced management team. With the renewed management focus, customers of TLG can expect greater service delivery, across a much broader spectrum of services,” said Fuchs.

Greater use of Maputo

Among the options being explored is that of making greater use of the Port of Maputo, although shipments are likely to be in containers only.

“We are participating in discussions over greater use of the port in Maputo,” retiring chief executive, Dawie Ferreira is reported to have said.

According to Capespan exports are expected to rise from around 132 million cartons to more than 160 million cartons by 2025. A large percentage of this rise in exports is expected to flow from the northern and eastern production regions, affecting activities via the ports at Port Elizabeth and Durban.

Recent agreements with China will make provision for bulk reefer shipments, and this will involve facilities within the TLG Group.

Citrus fruit for export, featured in report in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

Meanwhile, the Citrus Growers’ Association (CGA) has asked the South African government to play a more meaningful role in resolving infrastructure problems instead of pouring more money into loss making enterprises.

CGA’s Justin Chadwick wrote is his recent newsletter to growers that “….Durban port, which handles the bulk of southern African citrus, is creaking. The infrastructure is badly in need of an upgrade, and new equipment is sorely needed. In addition, the port operations lag international norms in terms of port efficiency. One of the points in our six-point plan is to improve efficiency of the port.”

Chadwick said other elements included making greater use of Maputo port, increasing the volume transported to Durban by rail, increasing capacity of coldstores in the Durban port precinct, as well as investment in hubs where cargo can be accumulated and railed into the port, and the use of IT to assist in improving efficiencies. sources: Fresh Plaza, Fruitnet, CGA

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

NEW COMOROS COMMUNICATIONS UNDERSEA CABLE TO BECOME OPERATIONAL IN THIRD QUARTER

Leon Thevenin, the French cable layer stationed at Cape Town which operates on stand-by along the African coast. Picture: Terry Hutson, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Leon Thevenin, the French cable layer stationed at Cape Town which operates on stand-by along the African coast.       Picture: Terry Hutson

Communications cable company Orange has advised that the Comoros – Mayotte 400 km FLY-LION3 undersea cable being installed between the Mozambique Channel islands of Comoros and Mayotte has been completed.

It is expected that the commissioning of the cable system will be performed in the third quart of 2019.

The project was unveiled in mid-2017 and then a 2018 delivery date was targeted.

The group’s subsidiary Orange Marine has been responsible for laying the cable between Grande Comore’s largest city Moroni and the village of Kaweni, near Mayotte’s capital Mamoudzou, where the cable has recently landed.

With a total capacity of 4 terabits per second, FLY-LION3 will help improve connectivity in the Indian Ocean, linking to existing cables LION2 and EASSy, which land on the east coast of Africa.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

JAPAN COMES OUT IN SUPPORT OF OPEN-LOOP SCRUBBERS, SAYS NO THREAT TO ENVIRONMENT

Japan's says open-loop scrubbers are no threat to environment, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS

A report presented to the International Maritime Organization (IMO) by Japan’s Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) has come out in favour of permitting the use of open-loop scrubbers on ships.

The Ministry announced last week that Japan would not be joining recent talks on the implementation of a ban on open-loop scrubbers.

In its report to the IMO MLIT Japan said that it has come to a conclusion that…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

ANADARKO PETROLEUM TO INVEST US$176 MILLION IN MOZAMBIQUE IN FIRST HALF OF 2019

Mozambique Block (Area) 1 where Anadarko is investing, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Mozambique Block (Area) 1 where Anadarko is investing

Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, which is involved in developing gas fields in northern Mozambique, will be investing up to US$176 million in the Rovuma basin’s natural gas exploration project in northern Mozambique in the first half of this year. That figure is before the project’s partners make a final investment decision.

According to Anadarko’s 2018 annual report on 2018, the figure of about $176 million constitutes the group’s share of costs related to site preparation for construction of an onshore plant.[/restrict]

The report said that deadlines are being met for the oil company to decide in the first half of the year whether it will definitively move ahead with the project, and investors have been warned to expect, “an adjustment of capital investment forecasts if the project is approved.”

Mozambique LNG1 Company Pte Ltd., the Rovuma Area 1 Area sales partner, in 2018 signed agreements for the sale of 7.5 million tonnes of liquefied natural gas per year, as well as an agreement of 2 million tonnes per year signed recently, leaving the group with all the information it needs to make a final investment decision.

The Mozambican government “approved the Development Plan for the two initial processing units operated by Anadarko in the Golfinho/Atum project,” known as Area 1, noting that, “the contracts for the selection of contractors for construction of onshore and offshore plants are being finalised,” in time for the final investment decision by June 2019.

The final investment decision in Area 1, through a public announcement, will confirm all investment in infrastructure (roads, buildings, aerodrome, among others) already in progress for over a year in the Afungi peninsula, district of Palma, in the province of Cabo Delgado, northern Mozambique. source: Macauhub[/restrict]

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

MODEC AWARDED FPSO CONTRACT FOR SNE FIELD OFFSHORE SENEGAL

FPSO Baobab Ivoirien which is currently deployed off Côte d'Ivoire.
FPSO Baobab Ivoirien which is currently deployed off Côte d’Ivoire.  Picture: MODEC

MODEC, Inc, the Japanese general contractor of floating production systems including Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) units, says its subsidiary, MODEC International Inc, has been awarded a contract by Woodside Energy (Senegal) B.V., as operator of the SNE Field Development, for a Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel for Senegalese waters.

Under the contract, MODEC will perform Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) for the FPSO and, subject to a final investment decision on the project in 2019, will be responsible for the supply, charter and operations of the FPSO.

The SNE deep-water oil field is expected to be Senegal’s first offshore oil development. The field is located within the Sangomar Deep Offshore permit area, approximately 100 kilometres south of Dakar, Senegal.

The FPSO will be designed to produce around 100,000 barrels of crude oil per day, with the first oil production targeted in 2022. The FPSO will be moored in water depth of approximately 800 metres.

In recent years, numerous offshore oil fields have been discovered in West Africa, and MODEC says it considers this as one of its most important core regions.

MODEC currently operates three FPSOs in Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire and has supplied another seven floating production facilities, such as FPSO / FSO / Tension Leg Platform (TLP), that have been installed in Angola, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon and Nigeria.

The SNE field is held by Woodside Energy (Senegal) B.V. (35%) as Operator, Cairn Energy Senegal (40%), FAR Limited (15%) and PETROSEN (10%) under a Production Sharing Contract (PSC).

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

DIGITAL FACELIFT FOR MOMBASA TEA TRADE

Kenya tea plantations. Picture: EATTA, featured on Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Picture: EATTA

Mombasa’s tea auctioning process is about to undergo an overhaul by way of going the digital route.

This follows the East African Tea Trade Association (EATTA) having received Sh150.2 million to upgrade the Mombasa Auction, reports the Standard Digital.

As a result the the entire tea auctioning process at Mombasa will be…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

NEW UGANDA PORT FOR KAMPALA RECEIVES GO-AHEAD

Victoria, one of the best-known large ships including standard ferries in service with the respective countries sharing Lake Victoria, featuring in a report in Africa PORTS & SHIPS
Victoria, one of the best-known large ships including standard ferries in service with the respective countries sharing Lake Victoria

Approval has been granted for the construction of the New Kampala Port on Lake Victoria which will be at Busaka, in the town of Kira in Uganda’s Wakiso District. Kira is 14km to the east of Kampala.

The approval was granted this week by the National Environment Management Authority (Nema) despite concerns recorded by Ms Leilah Akello, a senior environment assessment officer at Nema on the grounds that building a new port in that location could lead to dredging.

“The total area and volume of sediments to be dredged is…

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below…

GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

in partnership with – APO

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

News continues below

TO ADVERTISE HERE

Request a Rate Card from info@africaports.co.za

 

EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

 

News continues below

CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

 

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Only in the early morning light of day, and of life, can we see the world without its shadows. Truth requires new beginnings.”
– Jeb Dickerson

♠♠♠

ADVERTISING

For a Rate Card please contact us at info@africaports.co.za

Don’t forget to send us your news and press releases for inclusion in the News Bulletins. Shipping related pictures submitted by readers are always welcome. Email to info@africaports.co.za

 

TABLE BAY UNDERWAY SHIPPING
SHIP PHOTOGRAPHERS
Colour photographs and slides for sale of a variety of ships.
Thousands of items listed featuring famous passenger liners of the past to cruise ships of today, freighters, container vessels, tankers, bulkers, naval and research vessels.P O BOX 809, CAPE TOWN, 8000, SOUTH AFRICA
snai@worldonline.co.za
http://home.worldonline.co.za/~snai

 

 

South Africa’s most comprehensive Directory of Maritime Services will shortly be listed on this site. Please advise if you’d like your company to be included. To sign up for a free listing contact info@africaports.co.za or register online