Africa PORTS & SHIPS Maritime News — 19 November 2018

 

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002
Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

These news reports are updated and added to on an ongoing basis.  Check back regularly for the latest news as it develops – where necessary refresh your page at www.africaports.co.za  

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FIRST VIEW: MV A80

MV A80 sailing from Durban, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news. Picture: Keith Betts
MV A80.       Picture: Keith Betts

Recently we featured several photographs and the story of two patrol type vessels that arrived in the port of Durban after a harrowing voyage across the Indian Ocean and the Mozambique Channel, culminating in a severe storm at sea near Richards Bay during which the two vessels, PRINCESS JENNIFER and PRINCESS JOHANNA took structural damage. This forced them to seek refuge in Durban where they underwent repair before completing their delivery voyage to the Gulf of Guinea. Earlier this month another all aluminium vessel of similar construction arrived in Durban, also on delivery from Singapore to the Gulf of Guinea – this was the offshore supply vessel A80 (IMO 9855018) which includes firefighting capability and which joined a second vessel already at the Bayhead. The owner and manager of this vessel is EA Temile & Sons of Warri, Nigeria. Here A80 is seen departing from Durban as she resumed her journey to West Africa. This picture is by Keith Betts

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TOTAL READY TO START DRILLING OFF SOUTH AFRICAN COAST

Odfjell Deep Stavanger, now on her way to drill off Mossel Bay, reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Odfjell Deep Stavanger, now on her way to drill off Mossel Bay

French oil major Total E&P is about to start drilling for oil in the South Outeniqua Deepwater Basin off the coastof Mossel Bay early next month (December).

See our report dated 15 May Total to return to offshore oil exploration in South African waters

According to Petroleum Africa the drilling could prove to be one of Africa’s most prospective oil exploration assets with multi-billion-barrel potential and a high chance of success.

Total is the operator of…

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PEMBA LOGISTICS BASE (BLP) TO RECEIVE SHIPS FROM JANUARY

An optimistic view of the proposed completed logistic base at Pemba, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
An optimistic view of the proposed completed logistic base at Pemba

A report on Radio Mozambique says that the Pemba Logistics Base (BLP) in northern Mozambique should be ready to receive its first ships from January 2019.

That’s according to José Daúde, the operational director at Portos de Cabo Delgado,

Daúde told the broadcaster that construction of a…

Pemba port and town feaured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The Port of Pemba (pictured) continues to be used as a logistics ‘base’ for the SA Navy during its Operation Copper patrols of the Mozambique Channel. The navy ship currently on patrol here is SAS Drakensberg. Above is an aerial view of the actual port of Pemba and the town of that name.

 

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PE PORT FESTIVAL LAUNCHED WITH FOCUS ON THE PEOPLE OF PORT ELIZABETH

Tracy Lovemore (CMA-CGM’s Regional Manager) with Captain Brynn Adamson (TNPA), appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Tracy Lovemore (CMA-CGM’s Regional Manager) with Captain Brynn Adamson (TNPA)

The management team of the Port of PE (Port Elizabeth) have enthusiastically launched Transnet National Ports Authority’s (TNPA) People’s Port Festival to its customers, inviting them to come on board as partners to collectively give back to the community.

“The Port Festival has been centred around people. These people do not only include Transnet employees, the port users and port customers, but also the broader business community, all levels of government and the communities of Nelson Mandela Bay and surrounding areas,” said Rajesh Dana, Port Manager.

Asanda Mlata (MBDA), Funeka Ngqunge (CVC Africa), Cleo Ntsangani (Transnet Port Terminals/TPT) and Sujit Bhagattjee (TNPA), appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Asanda Mlata (MBDA), Funeka Ngqunge (CVC Africa), Cleo Ntsangani (Transnet Port Terminals/TPT) and Sujit Bhagattjee (TNPA)

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) says its key objectives include building positive long term and sustainable relationships with all stakeholders, inspiring young people to see the maritime industry as a lucrative career, promoting the twin ports of Nelson Mandela Bay (the Ports of PE and Ngqura) – showcasing its diversity and its contribution to the local economy – and offering a fun filled weekend of activities for the broader Nelson Mandela Bay community.

“This festival will provide the perfect platform to market our port city locally, nationally and internationally. It takes place over the weekend of 1 and 2 December.

“This year’s festival promises to be bigger and better than last year, offering an exciting blend of water and landside activities – free edutainment and once-in-a-lifetime experiences for the whole family,” Dana concluded.

Sujit Bhagattjee (TNPA) with Jeannie Gerber (BLG Logistics), appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Sujit Bhagattjee (TNPA) with Jeannie Gerber (BLG Logistics)

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NEW BOLD VISION TILTS CAPITAL FLOWS INTO AFRICA

AfDB banner featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Africa Investment Forum 2018 — a solid pipeline of projects and wealth of opportunities ready for investors

“Vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others,” a saying goes. When African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org) President Akinwumi Adesina laid out his vision to tilt the flow of capital into Africa by convening the first transaction-based investment forum, many did not see what was coming ahead.

One year down the road, the verdict is undisputed.

The three-day Africa Investment Forum ended 9 November in the South African capital exceeded the expectations of its conveners – The African Development Bank. Beyond participants’ commendations, a…

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SA PORT STATISTICS FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER 2018 ARE NOW AVAILABLE HERE

Port statistics for the month of October 2018, covering the eight commercial ports under the administration of Transnet National Ports Authority, are now available.

The port with the highest turnover throughput in terms of tonnages handled was again Richards Bay, followed by the general cargo port of Durban, followed by iron ore export port at Saldanha. The ports of Ngqura and Cape Town individually handled over one million tonnes of cargo while Port Elizabeth handled close to 900,000 tons of cargo. Details are in the tables below.

Throughputs for the port during August were…

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WANING PIRACY THREAT OFF EAST AFRICA NO REASON FOR RELAXATION, IMO DURBAN WORKSHOP HEARS

Delegates from 25 countries that are signatories to the Djibouti Code of Conduct (DCoC) attending an IMO/SAMSA three-day workshop in Durban, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news. Picture: SAMSA
Delegates from 25 countries that are signatories to the Djibouti Code of Conduct (DCoC) attending an IMO/SAMSA three-day workshop in Durban         Picture: SAMSA

The virtual elimination of piracy along eastern oceans of the African continent over the last few years – thanks to a concerted highly collaborative international effort – is no reason for the continent to relax.

Other serious crimes involving and affecting international shipping and impacting global trade remain a constant threat and present danger, delegates to a three day International Maritime Organization (IMO) workshop in Durban heard on Monday.

Mr William Azuh, IMO head Africa Section . picture: SAMSA, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Mr William Azuh.    picture: SAMSA

Mr William Azuh, head of the Africa section of the IMO’s technical cooperation division, told the dozens of delegates that while collaborating actions to deter piracy had largely been successful, “Make no mistake about this, the pirates are not done yet.”

Mr Azuh was speaking during the first of a scheduled three day IMO workshop for countries in Africa that are members of the IMO’s anti-piracy Djibouti Code of Conduct and its revised version, the ‘Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct 2017’.

According to the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA), hosts of the workshop along with the Department of Transport (DoT), the DCoC is a regional counter piracy programme with the main objective of repressing piracy and armed robbery against ships in the Gulf of Aden and West Indian Ocean regions.

However, the revised version – the ‘Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct 2017’ – has since expanded the scope of the DCoC to include all acts of criminality in the maritime environment, including illicit maritime activities such as human trafficking and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

According to the IMO, the Jeddah Amendment “recognizes the important role of the ‘blue economy’ including shipping, seafaring, fisheries and tourism in supporting sustainable economic growth, food security, employment, prosperity and stability.

“But it expresses deep concern about crimes of piracy, armed robbery against ships and other illicit maritime activity, including fisheries crime, in the Western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden. Such acts present grave dangers to the safety and security of persons and ships at sea and to the protection of the marine environment.

“Crucially,” says the IMO, “The Jeddah Amendment calls on the signatory States to cooperate to the fullest possible extent to repress transnational organised crime in the maritime domain, maritime terrorism, illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing and other illegal activities at sea.

“This will include information sharing; interdicting ships and/or aircraft suspected of engaging in such crimes; ensuring that any persons committing or intending to commit such illicit activity are apprehended and prosecuted; and facilitating proper care, treatment, and repatriation for seafarers, fishermen, other shipboard personnel and passengers involved as victims.”

The three day workshop in Durban was the first of its kind for the Africa region aimed at finding agreement and drawing up action plans for establishment of national and regional maritime information sharing centres for improved maritime domain awareness.

Maritime domain awareness (MDA) is described as constituting three aspects; situational awareness, threat awareness and response awareness. For effectiveness to the benefit of a wider community, MDA needs to exist at national (country), regional (continental) and international level.

According to William Azuh, the vastness of the global maritime domain was such that no region or country in Africa or elsewhere was totally safe and crucially, no region of the world could act alone in efforts to combat crimes at sea that impact global shipping and trade.

“Without the understanding and effective management of the maritime sphere, we all labour in vain,” he said, adding that maintaining the success achieved to date against piracy in a sustainable manner, was dependent on meticulous implementation of IMO guidance and best management practices.

For Mr Azuh’s full remarks click on video at the foot of this report.

Mr Azuh’s remarks were shared by Mr Sobantu Tilayi, Chief Operations Officer of SAMSA who on behalf of the South African government under the auspices of the Department of Transport, welcomed the delegates to the country.

Mr Sobantu Tilayi (left) with Mr William Azuh, IMO section head in Africa, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news, picture courtesy: SAMSA
Mr Sobantu Tilayi (left) with Mr William Azuh.      Picture: SAMSA

Mr Tilayi said it was significant that South Africa was hosting the event relevant to its role in both regional and international maritime matters, and precisely those include ensuring safety of eople and property at sea.

He said that ever evolving advances in communication technology were among tools that needed to be brought into the fray towards strengthening safety and security of shipping and South Africa has quite a contribution to make in this regard. He enumerated the Nelson Mandela University in Port Elizabeth as among research institutions in the country that were making a significant contribution.

Mr Tilayi’s full remarks are available in the video below

The issue of maritime sector shipping safety and security was a concern not only of countries with direct access to the oceans, according to Mr Timothy Walker, senior researcher at the Institute of Security Studies in Pretoria.

Speaking on “Making Safer Seas for Africa” he said piracy at sea and armed robbery of ships had a direct and immediate impact on global trade which involved all countries of the world.

Timothy Walker, ISS snr reseearcher, Pretoria, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news. Picture: SAMSA
Timothy Walker     Picture: SAMSA

But also, he said, inland waters across countries in Africa were not excluded as there are vast areas of these waters that were used for shipping and therefore remained attractive to criminals.

For this reason, cooperation to improve security of the marine domain was of equal economic benefit to everyone.

Workshop coordinator Jon Huggins expressed satisfaction with both the intensity and focus of the deliberations, expressing the hope that by day three on Wednesday, there would be clarity on a plan of action forward.

source: SAMSA

VIDEOS FROM THE MEETING

For the welcoming speech by Mr William Ahuh, click the video below (14:51]

Comments below by Sobantu Tilayi, Chief Operating Officer at SAMSA  [5:09]

Speech by ISS researcher Timothy Walker click the video below [8:58]

Closing comments by Mr Jon Huggins, click the following [2:15]

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FORSEA (FORMERLY HH FERRIES GROUP) COMPLETES CONVERSION OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST BATTERY FERRIES

Aurora electric ferry. Image courtesy of ForSea ©, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Aurora electric ferry.     Image courtesy of ForSea ©

Inauguration of Tycho Brahe and Aurora marks successful completion of a high-profile conversion project with ABB’s technology at its heart.

These largest emission-free ferries in the world have been officially welcomed into service after guests boarded Tycho Brahe in Helsingborg, Sweden and Helsingør, Denmark on 9 November for a special inauguration ceremony marking…

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

Aurora electric ferry in open water. Image courtesy of ForSea ©, in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Aurora electric ferry in open water.       Image courtesy of ForSea ©

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DP WORLD INLAND CONTAINER TERMINAL OPENS NEAR KIGALI, RWANDA

Picture: Gowling WLG, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Picture: Gowling WLG

DP World Kigali’s Logistics Platform is a secure, bonded facility spread over 13 hectares

DP World and the government of Rwanda announced today (Wednesday 14 November 2018) that they have setup a state-of-the-art­ logistics hub, located 20 kilometres from the capital city Kigali, close to the international airport­.

The facility is East Africa’s first ever Inland Dry Port developed by DP World.

DP World Kigali is a secure, bonded facility spread over…

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GREENPEACE AFRICA CELEBRATES A DECADE OF ENVIRNMENTAL ACTIVISM

Greenpeace logo, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Partnering with artists, volunteers and other civil society organisations, the environmental watchdog is organising an open day to spark an environmental revolution

This November, Greenpeace Africa celebrates 10 years of environmental activism on the African continent.

Partnering with artists, volunteers and other civil society organisations, the environmental watchdog is organising an open day to spark an environmental revolution. As part of commemorative activities in South Africa and Senegal, artwork will be used to encourage partners and Africans to celebrate their individual acts of courage towards the environment.

“Greenpeace Africa is using this occasion to highlight environmental concerns and calling on partners to share their memories of being part of this environmental movement over the years. The challenges facing the environment are enormous in Africa and it is impossible for Greenpeace Africa to address them without the goodwill of other stakeholders,” says Njeri Kabeberi, Greenpeace Africa’s Executive Director.

Greenpeace Africa currently runs campaigns on four key issues on the continent; to protect the Congo Basin from large-scale deforestation, stop overfishing in West Africa, promote ecological farming in the horn of Africa as well as demand a shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources in South Africa in order to reverse the impacts of climate change.

Greenpeace ship MY Esperanza which has been used off West Africa to protect the fishing grounds, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Greenpeace ship MY Esperanza which has been used off West Africa to protect the fishing grounds.      Picture: Greenpeace

Over the past 10 years, Greenpeace Africa has exposed illegal fishing by Chinese companies in West Africa which led to the cancellation of over 29 fishing licenses in 2012 and pushed relevant ministries to seek help from Greenpeace Africa in finding solutions to the problem of Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing in West Africa.

In the Congo Basin, Greenpeace has investigated and exposed breaches on the moratorium and succeeded to push the government to cancel more than three illegal logging titles. The region also boasts the organisation’s largest and most active volunteer base in Africa.

The ten-year anniversary is an opportunity for Greenpeace Africa to appreciate and amplify the contribution of local and indigenous communities, volunteers, staff and donors who have given substance in our struggle to protect the environment. Greenpeace Africa is also celebrating a decade of fruitful militant contribution towards protecting the planet and the amazing work of partners that resonate across the continent.

“After ten years of countless affirmative actions down the lane, the people remain central to Greenpeace Africa’s identity. Communities are at the heart of who we are and what is needed to create the green and peaceful Africa we crave for. Without the activists, volunteers, partners and local communities, Greenpeace Africa will just be a farce and we won’t be able to face environmental injustices with courage,” said Njeri.

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DISAPPOINTING START TO MSC MUSICA’S ISLAND CRUISES

MSC Musica sailing from Durban last Thursday, 8 November 2018. Picture: Clinton Wyness, as reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
MSC Musica sailing from Durban last Thursday, 8 November 2018.     Picture: Clinton Wyness

MSC Cruises 2018/19 South African cruise season got off to the worst possible start last Friday (9 November) when MSC MUSICA arrived  at Portuguese Island.

The 92,000-gt ship arrived in Durban on Wednesday last week and after two days of partying and provisioning at her southern summer homeport and with a near full complement of passengers on board she set off bound for Maputo Bay.

On arrival in Maputo Bay and with a welcome calm sea MSC Musica dropped anchor off Portuguese Island, as passengers prepared for what they expected would be a full day of fun and relaxatiion on a tropical island, or perhaps a side excursion to nearby Inhaca Island.

That wasn’t to be!

As has been previously reported, MSC Cruises has developed quite extensive facilities on the otherwise deserted Portuguese Island where local islanders from nearby Inhaca are employed to provide essential services while other locals set up stalls to sell home-produced souvenirs etc. For the island folk this is in many instances an essential term of employment, even if it is for half the year.

The news that greeted the ship however was that there was unrest on the island and that the people were waiting for the ship to arrive to express their grievances to someone in authority.

So instead of passengers being the ones to board the tenders that carry passengers and crew from the ship to the beaches on Portuguese Island, it was the ship’s master, Captain Pinto, together with his chief engineer and a number of his officers and perhaps some of his security staff who boarded the tender and set off in the direction of the island.

What transpired there is not known but they returned a little later after which an announcement was made to the effect that on account of fears for “passenger safety” due to unrest ashore, the shore visit to Portuguese Island had been cancelled.

Shortly afterward, at noon,  the ship upped anchor and set off north-eastward towards the next destination, Pomene, where fortunately things went as planned and passengers were able to go ashore to enjoy the facilities.

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WORLD’S MOST POWERFUL CUTTER SUCTION DREDGER SPARTACUS IS LAUNCHED

Spartacus launched, and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Spartacus launched

The world’s most powerful cutter suction dredger has been launched from the Royal IHC shipyard in the Netherlands.

The dredger, named SPARTACUS, has been built for the…

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LATEST EDITION OF THE NAVIGATOR IS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD NOW

The Nautical Institute banner, which appears with news of the NI in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

NI reports…
The latest edition of The Navigator is available for download now.

Readers are able to appreciate the seafarer’s method of keeping watch as the Nautical Institute’s October journal The Navigator (N°19) explores the important role of a ship’s lookout, and the challenges which arise on duty.

Discussion begins with Captain Rajiv Singh who investigates…

Reported by Paul Ridgway
London

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STRONG WINDS, SEA SWELL CLOSES DURBAN PORT TO INCOMING VESSELS

Port of Durban entrance, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Tuesday, 13 November 2018: 12h20:  As a result of strong winds buffeting the KwaZulu-Natal coast, where the north-easterly is gusting at over 35 knots and a forecast of this increasing possibly to 45 knots today (Tuesday), the Port of Durban has been closed to incoming traffic. (see below)

This decision is enforced by the strong swell of 5 metres at the entrance to the port.

The port closure will be reassessed later in the day.

UPDATE: The following Port Notification update was issued Tuesday at 18h00:

Port Information Update: Weather Interruptions

Please note that incoming movements has been suspending as from yesterday at 18h30, 12 November 2018. Weather condition recoded as follows:

  • Yesterday at 18h30, 12 November 2018; wind 50 knots NE’ly and swell at 5m
  • Currently 17h30, 13 November 2018; wind 40 knots NE’ly and swell at 5.5m

It must be noted that the prevailing weather conditions makes it unsafe to safely navigate vessel into the Port entrance. Port Control together with our Marine Pilots are continuously monitoring the situation 24/7. Weather is predicted to only start subsiding by tomorrow morning, Wednesday 14 November 2018.

Further updates

Wednesday morning (06h00):  The day has dawned sunny and with only a slight breeze blowing though this may increase in velocity during the day.

Wednesday 12h00, Port Control advises the following:

Kindly be advised that the Port of Durban has officially opened at 06:00 am this morning ,We have started with incoming vessels and we have a total of 16 incoming vessels to be serviced , 2 sailing vessels and 3 shifting vessels .

We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience caused by the weather delays and we are doing our level best to service the vessels .

 

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IMO DURBAN WORKSHOP HAS SHIPPING SAFETY & SECURITY UNDER SPOTLIGHT

Delegates to the IMO workshop on the implementation of the Djibouti Code of Conduct gather for a group picture ahead of the three-day meeting being held in Durban, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Delegates to the IMO workshop on the implementation of the Djibouti Code of Conduct gather for a group picture ahead of the three-day meeting being held in Durban

A three-day International Maritime Organization (IMO) workshop being held in Durban this week is focusing on ship safety and security issues, with a focus on the clamping down on piracy and other forms of criminal activity in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden.

Under the spotlight are discussions on the establishment of National Maritime Information Sharing Centres in each of the states that have signed up to the Djibouti Code of Conduct (DCoC) – a regional counter piracy programme whose main objective is repressing piracy and armed robbery against ships in the Gulf of Aden and West Indian Ocean.

Discussions are also centring on creating synergy with the newly-established Regional Maritime Information Fusion Centre (RMIFC) in Madagascar and the Regional Maritime Operational Coordination Centre (RMOCC) in Seychelles.

“The workshop will also discuss the development of common Standard Operating Procedures and incident reporting formats to promote interoperability and a regional strategy for information sharing to achieve Maritime Domain Awareness,” says the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) which is hosting of the workshop along with the Department of Transport (DoT).

The workshop began yesterday (Monday, 12 November 2018) and will run to Wednesday, 14 November 2018. It is being attended by delegates from the Gulf of Aden and West Indian Ocean region some of whom are member States, including South Africa.

SAMSA Chief Operations Officer Sobantu Tilayi says it is an “honour and privilege” to host such an important workshop.

The DCoC – and its revised version, known as the ‘Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct 2017’ – is aimed at tackling all acts of criminality in the maritime environment, including illicit maritime activities such as human trafficking and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

According to the IMO in a statement on its website, the Jeddah Amendment “recognizes the important role of the ‘blue economy’ including shipping, seafaring, fisheries and tourism in supporting sustainable economic growth, food security, employment, prosperity and stability.”

But the Agreement expresses “deep concern about crimes of piracy, armed robbery against ships and other illicit maritime activity, including fisheries crime, in the Western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden. Such acts present grave dangers to the safety and security of persons and ships at sea and to the protection of the marine environment.”

Of 17 eligible countries to sign the DCoC and its revised version, the Comoros, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Jordan, Madagascar, Maldives, Mozambique, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen, Kenya and Somalia are now signatories.

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PIRACY–EU NAVFOR PROTECTION TEAM KEEPING VITAL FOOD AID SAFE

Croatian AVPD team guarding the ship WFP Petra II, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Croatian AVPD team guarding the ship WFP Petra II

Protecting World Food Programme (WFP) and vulnerable vessels in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden is one of Operation Atalanta’s key tasks.

The WFP ship PETRA II has an embarked EU NAVFOR security team, known as…

LNG TANKER EVADES ARMED PIRATES IN GULF OF GUINEA

A LNG tanker came under attack in the Gulf of Guinea on 6 November, it has now been reported.

The attack took place in position…

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SUCCESSFUL AFRICA OIL WEEK 2018 CLOSES WITH PROMISING OUTLOOK FOR AFRICA

Africa Oil Week banner, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Africa Oil Week – the leading event dedicated to the African Oil and Gas industry successfully wrapped up after a content-packed conference and exhibition in Cape Town last Friday (9 November).

The leading business and intelligence business platform spread across five days was attended by over 1,500 delegates.

Delegates from around the world exchanged thoughts and the latest insights taking place in Africa and the future of the Oil and Gas industry. The conference also held sessions focusing on African Production, Exploration and Future Outlooks for the sector as well as the energy transition outlook to 2050 and how technology and finance are creating new options for gas.

This year, 17 Government ministers were in attendance at the event, including ministers from South Africa, Nigeria, Mali, Uganda, Gambia, Congo, Niger, Cote d’lvoire, Guinea, Namibia, and Sudan. Additionally, during the course of the event, more than 200 speakers took part in the conference and exhibition, providing over 50+ hours of industry insights and networking opportunities.

“The conference has tackled some of the most compelling issues facing the African upstream today. With luminaries such as Hon Minister Jeff Radebe, Minister of Energy, Republic of South Africa and Dr Fatih Birol, Executive Director, IEA, outlining their commitment to a sustainable future, Hon Minister Kachikwu confirming the direction of the Nigerian upstream and the American government confirming their commitment to African energy development, Africa Oil Week delivered both insights and tangible take-aways for operators, banks, service companies and governments alike,” said Paul Sinclair, Conference Director.

On the final day of the event, AOW hosted a dedicated student programme new for 2018, which more than 100 students attended. The session was partnered with institutions including University of Cape Town, University of the Western Cape, University of Namibia and University of Dar es Salaam and focused on capacity building and workforce development.

The next Africa Oil Week event will take place in Cape Town, South Africa on the 4 – 8 November 2019. For the more information about the event please visit: www.Africa-OilWeek.com

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EXERCISE TRIDENT JUNCTURE 2018 – NATO DESTROYS WARTIME MINES

Multi-mission warship HNLMS Karel Doorman, observed from HNLMS Johan de Witt, an amphibious platform, (both of the Royal Netherlands Navy) berthed early October in Trondheim ahead of NATO’s Exercise Trident Juncture 18 sea-phase off coast of Norway. Photos kindly provided by NATO MARCOM ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Multi-mission warship HNLMS Karel Doorman, observed from HNLMS Johan de Witt, an amphibious platform, (both of the Royal Netherlands Navy) berthed early October in Trondheim ahead of NATO’s Exercise Trident Juncture 18 sea-phase off coast of Norway. Photos kindly provided by NATO MARCOM ©

Standing NATO Mine Counter Measures Group One (SNMCMG1) under the command of Commander Peter Ramboer of the Belgian Navy located and destroyed in Norwegian waters two mines from the Second World War while conducting training as a part of Exercise Trident Juncture 2018.

Here the group was practicing clearing sea routes for an amphibious assault when the Norwegian minehunter HNoMS Maaloey detected two historical mines. After inspection with…

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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NAVY TUG DE MIST SINKS IN SIMON’S TOWN HARBOUR

De Mist in November 1978 undergoing sea trials at Durban. Picture: Trevor Jones, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
De Mist in November 1978 undergoing sea trials at Durban.    Picture: Trevor Jones

One of the decommissioned SA Navy tugs has sunk in Simon’s Town harbour.

The tug is DE MIST which was decommissioned in or about 2015/16 when replaced by the newly built tug IMVUBU. De Mist sank at her mooring on Saturday shortly after officers doing rounds noticed her listing to one side.

Navy divers were called but they were unable to arrest…

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REMEMBRANCE: THEIR LIVETH FOR EVERMORE

The Band of the Royal Marines performed at the Royal British Legion Festival of Remembrance held at the Royal Albert Hall on the evening of 10 November. Photo: Sergeant Randall (Royal Logistics Corps). MoD Crown Copyright 2018 ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SDHIPS maritime news
The Band of the Royal Marines performed at the Royal British Legion Festival of Remembrance held at the Royal Albert Hall on the evening of 10 November. Photo: Sergeant Randall (Royal Logistics Corps). MoD Crown Copyright 2018 ©

One hundred years ago, the First World War ended, and a new world began.

The example and experience of those who lived through it shaped the world we live in today. At the Festival of Remembrance in London this year, in the presence of The Royal Family, The Royal British Legion led the nation in saying Thank You to all who served, sacrificed and changed our world. This event was held on the night of 10 November.

Attended by HM The Queen, Patron of The Royal British Legion, and senior members of the Royal Family, this year’s programme included special guest artists Sir Tom Jones, Sheridan Smith, Sir Bryn Terfel, Tom Fletcher and Danny Jones, Sheku Kanneh-Mason and the Kingdom Choir.

They performed alongside the Band of HM Royal Marines, the Band of the Coldstream Guards, Band of the Scots Guards, Band of the Irish Guards, the Countess of Wessex’s String Orchestra, the Central Band of the Royal Air Force, and the Royal Air Force Squadronaires.

This event included serving and veterans’ representatives from across all three-Armed Services and had a finale with the traditional Two Minute Silence as poppy petals fell from the roof of the Royal Albert Hall, representing all lives lost in war.

On Sunday (11 November) Her Majesty and members of the Royal Family joined thousands to commemorate the centenary of the end of the First World War as part of the traditional National Service of Remembrance.

A two-minute silence was held at 11h00 and wreaths laid at the Cenotaph to commemorate the servicemen and women killed in all conflicts from the First World War onwards.

HRH The Prince of Wales laid a wreath on behalf of Her Majesty and an Equerry on behalf of The Duke of Edinburgh. Wreaths were laid by the Commonwealth High Commissioners and the Prime Minister also attended the service along with other members of the Cabinet, former Prime Ministers and Armed Forces personnel.

Hundreds of representative from veterans’ organisations including the Merchant Navy and the Fishing Fleets took part and marched past the Cenotaph to lay their wreaths then continue to Horse Guards Parade where HRH The Princess Royal took their salute.

This year the event took on an additional poignancy as the nation marked 100 years since the signing of the Armistice which ended the war on the Western Front at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918.

Federal German President HE Frank-Walter Steinmeier laid a wreath on behalf of the German people. It is the first time since the Cenotaph was erected and designated the national war memorial in 1920 that a representative of Germany has taken part in the National Service of Remembrance and his attendance symbolises the peace and friendship that exists between our two countries today.

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

At the Cenotaph in Whitehall, 11 November, left to right are First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Sir Philip Jones; Chief of the Defence Staff General Sir Nick Carter; Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier and Chief of the General Staff General Mark Carleton-Smith. MoD Crown Copyright 2018 ©, featured n Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
At the Cenotaph in Whitehall, 11 November, left to right are First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Sir Philip Jones; Chief of the Defence Staff General Sir Nick Carter; Chief of the Air Staff Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier and Chief of the General Staff General Mark Carleton-Smith. MoD Crown Copyright 2018 ©

 

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MADAGASCAR BY ESA’S COPERNICUS SENTINEL

Id 411360/Madagascar/Released 09/11/2018 10:00 am/Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO©, featured n Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Id 411360/Madagascar/Released 09/11/2018 10:00 am/Copyright contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO©

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission takes us over Madagascar.

This huge island nation, located off the east coast of Africa and seen in the right of the image, has a population of around 25 million. More than half of the country’s inhabitants are aged under 25. The island is also home to rare flora and fauna, having developed its own ecosystems and wildlife since splitting from the African continent some 160 million years ago.

Preserving its impressive biodiversity is an…

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

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WS SIRIUS, MOST POWERFUL HARBOUR & OCEAN-GOING TUG ENTERS SERVICE IN BRAZIL

WS SIRIUS. Picture: Wilson Sons Rebocares, featured in Africa aPORTS & SHIPS maritime news
WS SIRIUS.      Picture: Wilson Sons Rebocares

WS Sirius, the most powerful harbour and ocean going tugboat in Brazil, with a bollard pull of 90 tons, owned by Wilson Sons Rebocares, entered service last week in Porto Açu, located in the north of the State of Rio de Janeiro.

The tug’s more robust design, new and more efficient…

 

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TWENTY-SEVEN SOUTH AFRICAN ORGANISATIONS TAKE PART IN CHINESE IMPORT EXPO

Rob Davies, SA minister of trade & induatry, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Rob Davies

Twenty-seven South African organisations were hoping to clinch trade deals at the China International Import Expo (CIIE) last week.

The organisations, from agro-processing, footwear and…

 

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MAPUTO-CATEMBE BRIDGE OPENS OVER MAPUTO BAY

Picture: Deutsche Welle / R da Silva, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Picture: Deutsche Welle / R da Silva

The delayed opening of Africa’s longest suspension bridge across Maputo Bay, connecting the Mozambique capital with the town of Catembe on the opposite side of the wide estuary forming Maputo Bay, was officially opened on Saturday, 10 November 2018. 

The bridge, which is claimed to be the longest suspension bridge in all of Africa, was designed and built by…

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MOZAMBIQUE ISLAND HOSTS 15th SEMNIAR ON INDO-PORTUGUESE HISTORY

Fort of San Sebastian defends the island of Mozambique. Picture: Terry Hutson , featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Fort of San Sebastian defends the island of Mozambique.   Picture: Terry Hutson

Researchers and historians have been able to share experiences and deepen knowledge about the Indian Ocean at the International Seminar on Indo-Portuguese History which was held on the Island of Mozambique in Nampula province between 31 October and 3 November.

This was the fifteenth seminar on the Indian Ocean – chosen because of its importance in socio-economic and cultural relations between Portugal and India – and was organised by Universidade Lúrio and Universidade Nova de Lisboa.

The rector of the Lúrio University, Francisco Noa, was the first speaker and looked at the dimension of knowledge in the imagery of the Indian Ocean.

Island seminar held in November 2018 on Mozambique Island, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Island seminar held in November 2018 on Mozambique Island

The Island of Mozambique, the island city that gave its name to the country, celebrated its bicentennial anniversary this year. In centuries past it was one of the main stopovers in the round trips of the ships plying between Lisbon and Goa, as well as an important trading hub. The island was also an important trading hub in the days pre-Portuguese with ships from India and Oman making regular calls.

The East African coast was part of the state of India until 1752, in continuation of relationships forged in previous centuries and projected to the present day. The border of the Western Indian Ocean has long been a meeting point for Africans, Indians and Europeans, providing rich human and cultural exchange in an atmosphere of intense commercial activity.

The island of Mozambique became the centre of the Portuguese presence and one of the main planks of the intercontinental voyage, and where India shaped its longest-lasting territorial presence in the Zambezi basin.

This was the focus of the 15th International Seminar on Indo-Portuguese History, in the year in which this forum celebrates 40 years of existence and marks the second centenary of the island’s elevation from Mozambique to the city.

Themes during the seminar included:

– Mozambique – bicentennial city
– Mozambique and the India Route
– African, Indian and European: migrations and commercial networks
– Religious identities, territories and political configurations on the East African coast
– Material and visual culture in the Indian Ocean

For more information on the papers presented (mostly in Portuguese) visit CLICK HERE

1598 map of Ilha de Mocambique, featured n Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
1598 map of Ilha de Mocambique

 

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HNoMS HELGE INGSTAD NATO WARSHIP COLLISION

HNoMS HELGE INGSTAD 8 November 2018

It was reported from NATO MARCOM in Northwood, NW London that the Norwegian Navy’s HNoMS HELGE INGSTAD was involved in a collision with the Malta-flagged oil tanker SOLA TS in Norwegian waters at around 04h00 on 8 November while sailing inner Fjords for navigation training.

Due to the damage to the frigate it was moved to a safe place and the crew was evacuated in a professional manner. There are no reports of damages or leaks from the oil tanker and no report of serious injuries, though eight crewmembers are being treated for minor injuries.

The Norwegian Armed Forces are working with the Norwegian Coastal Authority to address the situation. HNoMS Helge Ingstad is part of the Standing NATO Maritime Group One (SNMG1). The group was sailing in and around the Fjords, following their participation in exercise Trident Juncture 2018 which concluded on 7 November.

The rest of SNMG1’s ships are understood to be positioned nearby at sea in the event that further assistance is required.

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

Video of the action taken to save the frigate.

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MOZAMBIQUE NAVY OFFICERS & PERSONNEL TRAINING IN INDIA

This is thought to be the type of Interceptor patrol boat being donated to Mozambique, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
This is thought to be the type of Interceptor patrol boat being donated to Mozambique

A group of Mozambique Navy officers and personnel are undergoing a two-week training course at Chennai in India in preparation of India donating two Interceptor patrol boats to the African country.

A statement issued by the Indian Navy said that India and Mozambique had started…

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GAS PROFITS TO PAY PORTION OF MOZAMBIQUE’S EMATUM DEBT

Ematum fishing trawlers that helped to collapse the Mozambique economy, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Ematum fishing trawlers that helped to collapse the Mozambique economy

Creditors and Mozambican government agree new bond loan restructuring

Mozambique has been able to come up with a plan to exchange US$726.524 million in bonds for new debt and a percentage of profits from natural gas exploration.

This is in relation to the 2016 debt crisis that the current government ‘inherited’ from the previous government involving US$1.4 billion of unauthorised debt arising from the procurement of 30 fishing and security vessels that the country neither wanted nor needed.

The order for the 24 trawlers and six patrol vessels was…

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DAMEN TO PRESENT NEW LEASING FUND FOR AFRICAN SHIPOWNERS

Drawing of Damen Sea Fisher stern trawler, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Drawing of Damen Sea Fisher stern trawler

Damen intends presenting its new vessel leasing fund which is specifically designed for African shipowners when it stages the first Damen Fishing Seminar* in Cape Town on 22 November.

*See that announcement HERE

“The new fund is particularly interesting for smaller, private fishing vessel owners,” says…

 

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SYRAH RESOURCES SELLS MOZAMBIQUE GRAPHITE TO CHINESE BUYER

 

Australia’s Syrah Resources has entered into a binding agreement to supply graphite extracted in Mozambique to China’s Qingdao Taida-Huarun New Energy Technology Co Ltd under a binding contract, the company said in a statement just released.

In terms of the agreement which enters into force immediately, the agreement with…

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MSC MUSICA ARRIVES IN SOUTH AFRICA AT START OF 2018/19 SUMMER SEASON

MSC Musica arriving Durban Pictures taken shortly before sunrise by Clinton Wyness (05h40) and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

MSC Musica arriving Durban Pictures taken shortly before sunrise by Clinton Wyness (05h40) and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

MSC Musica arriving Durban Pictures taken shortly before sunrise by Clinton Wyness (05h40) and featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
MSC Musica arriving Durban. Pictures taken on a cell phone by Clinton Wyness (05h40), shortly before sunrise

The cruise ship MSC MUSICA (IMO 9320087) arrived in Durban at dawn this morning (Wednesday 7 November) to kickstart a six-month summer cruise season sailing out of Durban and Cape Town.

The 294-metre long, 92,409-gt MSC Musica has replaced the slightly smaller MSC SINFONIA that handled MSC’s recent previous South African cruising calendar. Normally structured for 2,550 passengers in 1275 cabins and suites, the ship will carry over 3200 while cruising locally because many South Africans cruise as a family group, with additional beds/bunks installed in the cabins.

Most of Musica’s cruises will be out of Durban on 3, 4 and 5-night cruises to Mozambique destinations. Longer cruises are available to Mauritius and the ship will also undertake a short season cruising from Cape Town to Walvis Bay in Namibia.

MSC Musica remains in Durban overnight before beginning her cruises tomorrow (Thursday).

 

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GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

in partnership with – APO

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Request a Rate Card from info@africaports.co.za

 

EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

 

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

 

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

 

 

 

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THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“One of the advantages of being disorganized is that one is always having surprising discoveries.”
– AA Milne (Winnie-the-Pooh)

 

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