Africa PORTS & SHIPS Maritime News

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002
Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

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FIRST VIEW: STS CRANES EX NGQURA ARRIVE AT DURBAN CONTAINER TERMINAL

Zhen Hua arriving in Durban with two STS cranes ex Ngqura port. Picture by Gerald Maddams, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

STS cranes for Durban ex Port of Ngqura. Picture by Zamendelu Mncwango

STYS cranes for Durban ex Port of Ngqura. Picture by Zamendelu Mncwango
Ship to Shore cranes arriving at Durban container terminal from Port of Ngqura. Pictures (top) of heavylift Zhen Hua by GeraldMaddams, lower two pics by Zamendelu Mncwango

On 12 April 2018, two Liebherr DC Twin lift Cranes were sent from Ngqura Container Terminal to Durban Container Terminal [DCT] in response to an urgent need for more cargo handling equipment. The cranes were sent as deck cargo on the Chinese heavylift vessel, ZHEN HUA.

According to Transnet Port Te4rminalks (TPT), which operates the container terminals at both Ngqura and at Durban, the move is part of TPT’s drive to optimise use of its equipment and increase efficiencies at DCT as well as to ensure optimum berth utilisation.

Of the two cranes that have been redeployed, one will be based at the North Quay for Berth 204 which will assist in deploying a maximum of 4 cranes on a vessel. The other crane has been deployed at Pier 1 to ensure 6 crane capacity at the terminal is restored while one of the STS cranes is being repaired due to storm damage that occurred last year in October 2017. Although these cranes will primarily be utilised at berth 204 and at Pier 1, they will contribute to an overall positive impact to TPT’s Ship Working Hour for quicker vessel turnaround.

In the above three pictures, we see the heavylift ship Zhen Hua entering Durban with the two cranes on board. This picture is by Gerald Maddams.

The following two pictures are taken from on board the vessel as it has come alongside the berth at DCT where the first crane was to be offloaded. Later the ship would move to Pier 1 to repeat the exercise with the second crane. These two pictures are by Zamandelu Mncwango.

 

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UN’S IMO ADOPTS CLIMATE CHANGE STRATEGY FOR SHIPPING

IMO banner appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

The International Maritime Organization has after a week’s discussion adopted a climate change strategy for international shipping. The meeting, held during its 72nd session at IMO Headquarters in London, was attended by more than 100 member states.

Nations meeting at the United Nations International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London have adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from ships, setting out a vision to reduce GHG emissions from international shipping and phase them out, as soon as possible in this century.

The vision confirms IMO’s commitment to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and, as a matter of urgency, to phasing them out as soon as possible.

More specifically, under the identified “levels of ambition”, the initial strategy envisages for…

 

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PWC CALLS FOR MORE STRATEGIC INVESTMENT IN AFRICA’S PORTS

PwC's Andrew Shaw, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Andrew Shaw

ACCELERATED GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT BY STRENGTHENING TRADE

It was reported from Johannesburg on 12 April that Africa needs to take advantage of the economic potential of its ports and shipping sector if it is to realise its growth ambitions. Despite the high volumes of goods that require transport, the development and integration of ports in Africa’s wider logistic chains remains uneven.

Globally, ports are gateways for 80% of merchandise trade by volume and 70% by value. Investment in ports and their related transport infrastructure to advance trade and promote overall economic development and growth is therefore vital – particularly in emerging economies that are currently under-served by modern transportation facilities.

However, port investment must be channelled appropriately to ensure financial sustainability and economic growth. Investment is not always about building new ports or terminals – investment spent on infrastructure without cognisance of the efficiency and effectiveness of the performance of the port may not produce the desired results.

Port performance must be seen in the context of not only port infrastructure shortfalls, but also the fact that port performance has a direct impact on the efficiency and reliability of the entire transport network in which the port is just a node for the transfer of goods.

These are among the key findings of an analysis of port development in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) issued by PwC ( www.PwC.com) on 12 April.

The report, Strengthening Africa’s gateways to trade, was developed in response to the challenges facing SSA’s ports in attracting external investment and highlighting the regional economic and growth benefits thereof.

Readers are invited to download the report by: CLICKING HERE

Why ports matter

Sub-Saharan Africa's ports, as appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Sub-Saharan Africa’s ports

As an emerging market region endowed with vast resources and a growing population, SSA must accelerate its market access and trade across the region and with the rest of the world. PwC analysis shows that a 25% improvement in port performance could increase GDP by 2%, demonstrating the close relationship between port effectiveness and trade competitiveness. With growing congestion in many African ports, Africa runs the risk of sacrificing further growth through lack of investment in port terminal infrastructure. Access to effective ports, interconnecting infrastructure and efficient operations to cope with current demand and future growth, will lead to reduced costs and improved overall freight logistics efficiency and reliability – all of which are fundamental to the region’s future success.

PwC Report, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Despite the high volumes of goods that require transport, the development and integration of ports in Africa’s wider logistic chains remains uneven. Some ports are important generators of benefit and serve large hinterland areas, often extending beyond national borders. Others lag in terms of available facilities, reliability and efficiency in the handling of freight, which increase supply-chain costs. The disparities in performance between different ports impacts on Africa transport logistic chains, and makes African countries less competitive than they could be.

Dr Andrew Shaw, PwC Africa Transport and Logistics Leader, commented: “Ports are a vital part of the supply chain in Africa, with many ports having a far-reaching hinterland often spanning a number of countries, which makes them a natural focus for regional development.

“In this report we show that the global transportation and logistics industry can no longer afford to ignore developments in Africa. Logistics service providers and ports in particular will continue to play a key facilitator role in trade competitiveness and thus facilitate trade and sustained economic growth across the region.

“Trade competitiveness requires governments and key stakeholders to see ports as facilitators of trade and integrators in the logistics supply chain. Efficient ports can make countries and regions more competitive and thus improve their growth prospects. The reliability and efficiency of each port terminal, including minimising delay to shippers, is critical to enhancing future trade facilitation.’

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

 

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CARGO HANDLING TO INCREASE AT TANZANIA’S TANGA PORT

Port of Tanga showing lighters alongside the berths, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Tanga showing lighters alongside the berths

Tanzania’s oldest sea harbour and gateway, Tanga Port, is to have its cargo handling capability increased by 300% in the coming two years.

That’s the news from Tanga Port Manager, Percival Salama, as related by the Tanzanian newspaper, The Citizen.

Salama said this would enable the port to handle increased investment in the immediate region and also the hinterland that Tanga serves.

The Port of Tanga currently is capable of handling 750,000 tonnes of cargo…

About Tanga

Ship at anchor in the bay at Tanga, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Ship at anchor in the bay at Tanga

The port and town (now city) of Tanga dates back to at least the 14th Century when Persian seafarers and traders began using it as a safe harbour on the East African coast. The area has been occupied since the Iron Age based on the evidence of iron-age workings in the area.

Some quarters date the use of Tanga Bay as a harbour and trading post even further back to around

source: Africa PORTS & SHIPS

 

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DURBAN TUG INYALAZI CRUSHED AGAINST BERTH BY CAR CARRIER CSCC ASIA

Inayalzi assisted by Uthukela move across Durban Bay after the collision. Picture: Gerald Maddams, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Inayalzi assisted by Uthukela moves across Durban Bay after the collision. Picture: Gerald Maddams

Video ex YouTube

[1:00]

The short video above gives a graphic indication of something that went horribly wrong while the China Shipping Ro-Ro car carrier CSCC ASIA was being berthed at Durban’s R Berth.

The incident happened on Friday morning – the 13th of April which will no doubt add something further to those who believe the date to bring with it bad luck.

Unlucky it certainly proved to be for one of Durban’s older tugs, the Schottel-driven Inyalazi, built 1984, which was on her berth at the tug basin, which is close to R berth.

According to Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) they were notified that a…

 

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PANAMA JACK’S IN MOVE TO CAPE TOWN CRUISE TERMINAL

Cape Town Cruise Terminal, new home of Calico Jack's, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Cape Town Cruise Terminal, new home of Calico Jack’s

When the news broke that the harbour-side restaurant known as Panama Jack’s would have to move from its location within the harbour at Cape Town, very many patrons were unhappy.

Rather rough and ready in style, the restaurant had quickly become a favourite among Capetonians and many a visitor to the Mother City was taken there as if on a pilgrimage. In many respects Panama Jack’s was…

 

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RMS ST HELENA IS SOLD, BECOMES MNG TAHITI

RMS St Helena, as she will be remembered. Picture by Ian Shiffman, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
RMS St Helena, as she will be remembered. Picture by Ian Shiffman

In other news from Cape Town, Ian Shiffman reports that a buyer for the mail ship RMS St HELENA has been found and the ship already sold.

RMS St Helena operated the regular service between Cape Town and the South Atlantic island of St Helena, providing the only means of transport – both human and cargo – to and from….

 

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** CRUISE NEWS **
VIKING LINE CREATES SAILING SHIP WITH ROTOR SAIL ON VIKING GRACE

Viking Grace before the installation, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Viking Grace before the installation

The cruise ferry ship VIKING GRACE of Viking Line was transformed last week into a sailing ship.

On Thursday, 12 April 2018 Viking Grace became the world’s first passenger ship to be equipped with a rotor rail from which the ship will be able to operate with wind power.

Developed by the Finnish company Norsepower Oy Ltd, the Rotor Sail Solution will cut fuel consumption and reduce emissions by up to 900 tonnes annually. Viking Line commenced operating the Viking Grace on wind-assisted voyages between Turku (Finland) and Stockholm (Sweden) from 12 April 2018.

The cylindrical rotor sail installed on M/S Viking Grace is…

 

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** INTERNATIONAL NEWS **
US, FRENCH AND BRITISH FORCES HAVE STRUCK TARGETS IN SYRIA

The guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) fires a Tomahawk land attack missile. Laboon is deployed to the US 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners, and preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kallysta Castillo/Released ©) appearing in Afric a PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) fires a Tomahawk land attack missile. Laboon is deployed to the US 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners, and preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region. (US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kallysta Castillo/Released ©)

The following is a little removed from our normal area of interest but some readers who missed the weekend news might appreciate reading and seeing the following:

US, French and British forces have struck targets in Syria, US warships in action

At 02h00 UK time on 14 April, British forces joined close Allies (US and France) in a precision strike on Syrian installations involved in the use of chemical weapons.

The UK element of the carefully coordinated joint action was contributed by four Royal Air Force Tornado GR4s. They launched Storm Shadow cruise missiles at a military facility – a former missile base – some 15 miles west of Homs, where the regime is assessed to keep chemical weapon precursors stockpiled in breach of Syria’s obligations under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

The guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) fires a Tomahawk land attack missile. Monterey is deployed to the US 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners and preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region. (US Navy photo by Lt (JG) Matthew Daniels/Released ©), appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) fires a Tomahawk land attack missile. Monterey is deployed to the US 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations to reassure allies and partners and preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region. (US Navy photo by Lt (JG) Matthew Daniels/Released ©)

Statement by the NATO Secretary General

“I support the actions taken by the United States, the United Kingdom and France against the Syrian regime’s chemical weapons facilities and capabilities. This will reduce the regime’s ability to further attack the people of Syria with chemical weapons.

“NATO has consistently condemned Syria’s continued use of chemical weapons as a clear breach of international norms and agreements. The use of chemical weapons is unacceptable, and those responsible must be held accountable.

“NATO considers the use of chemical weapons as a threat to international peace and security, and believes that it is essential to protect the Chemical Weapons Convention. This calls for a collective and effective response by the international community.”

Our photographs here show US Navy assets in action. As far as is known British and French operations were conducted solely from the air.

Reported by Paul Ridgway
London

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GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

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EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

 

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

 

PIC OF THE DAY : RMS ST HELENA

RMS St Helena at the island. Picture courtesy: St Helena Tourism
RMS St Helena.     Picture courtesy St Helena Tourism

As has been reported above, the former mail ship known as RMS St HELENA has been sold to a company by name of MNG Maritime and renamed MNG TAHITI. Details are in the story above. So it is farewell to a regular caller at Cape Town, who knows whether we shall ever see her likes again. This picture if the ship at the island is courtesy St Helena Island Tourism

 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”
– Niels Bohr

 

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