Africa PORTS & SHIPS Maritime News

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002
Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

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FIRST VIEW: CNS HAIKOU 171

CNS Haikou 171 in Cap[e Town, February 2018. Picture: Ian Shiffman, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
CNS Haikou 171. Picture: Ian Shiffman
The Chinese naval destroyer CNS HAIKOU 171 which arrived in Cape Town yesterday for a short visit, together with two other Chinese naval ships (see Pics of the Day below). Haikou 171, which was built in 2005, is a missile destroyer of the type 052C or Lanzhou class designed primarily for fleet air defence purposes. This particular ship was among the three vessels that undertook China’s first deployment to the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Aden in 2008 on counter piracy patrols. This picture is by Ian Shiffman

 

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QUESTIONS ASKED OVER TRANSNET’S DECISION NOT TO BRING DISCIPLINARY ACTION OVER LOCO DEALS

TFR class 44 diesel-electric locomotives built by General Electric. Picture: Wikipedia Commons, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
TFR class 44 diesel-electric locomotives built by General Electric. Picture: Wikipedia Commons

Questions are being raised over Transnet’s decision not to institute any disciplinary processes or suspensions of any of its officials who might have been involved with the controversial R54 billion procurement of locomotives from four locomotive companies, in which kickbacks to outside agents involving the Gupta family have been alleged.

See Transnet’s statement in yesterday’s Africa PORTS & SHIPS Transnet calls for independent forensic auditor to further investigate locomotive purchase

In the statement Transnet said that Werksmans Attorneys report on the investigation it had carried out…

 

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LAMU PORT CONSTRUCTION FALLS BEHIND

The Lappset Corridor project based on a new port at Lamu. Map: Wikipedia Commons, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
The Lappset Corridor project based on a new port at Lamu. Map: Wikipedia Commons

Construction of the first phase of a new deepwater port at Lamu in north-eastern Kenya has fallen behind by at least three months.

The new port will ultimately have 32 berths, making Lamu one of the largest ports on the African east coast. However, the first of these berths will now be ready only in June, instead of…

 

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SA AGULHAS RETURNS – CADETS’ LIVES CHANGE AFTER ANTARCTICA JOURNEY

SA Agulhas from the air, PICTURE BY SAMSA, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
SA Agulhas from the air. Pictures: Samsa

The research and training ship SA Agulhas returned to South Africa on Friday, arriving in the Port of Port Elizabeth after completing an 83-day journey to the Antarctic region. On board the ship were 20 cadets, fresh from a unique experience not available to many.

The vessel, which is the South African Maritime Safety Authority’s (SAMSA) dedicated training vessel, sailed for Antarctica on 24 November, 2017, via Mauritius carrying the 20 cadets who are enrolled at several South African institutions pursuing maritime studies.

On arrival at Port Elizabeth the cadets were excited, anxious and described having “had an experience of a lifetime which changed their lives.” The expression on their faces, as they finally docked, spelt joy as well as a bit of relief at being home. Their lives had changed, they said. Given that many were afraid of the ocean, they were now proud to say they “walked on the Antarctic ice”.

The cadets – seven women and 13 men, all young, said they welcomed the opportunity to be part of the expedition.

SA Agulhas was chartered by an Indian science team who boarded and left the ship at Port Louis, Mauritius.

Delighted to be home. Picture: SAMSA, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Delighted to be home. Picture: SAMSA

During the journey to the “end of the earth” as the cadets described it, they engaged in unique maritime training sessions, with the added bonus of meeting new people from all over the world.

SAMSA Operations Manager for SAMSA’s Maritime Special Projects, Roland Shortt, said the journey of SA Agulhas was an exceptionally unique experience.

Highlighting how crucial it is to keep SA Agulhas at sea, he explained that the role of the training vessel served to enhance maritime training and also contributed to the development of the oceans economy.

“There is a dedicated cadet training programme on board where they receive direct training as if they were in a classroom. They have dedicated training officers whose sole purpose is to groom, mentor and train the cadets. Their training involves many tasks including bridge watch keeping (navigation), passage spanning, and astronavigation.

“They also get to be trained in the engineering side of the ship. This exposes them to training on maintenance of the ship’s power plant,” said Shortt.

“Unlike putting them in a merchant vessel, where they would be shadowing the officers, in the SA Agulhas they do not merely watch; they are dedicatedly taken through the process, layer by layer,” he explained.

Shortt said the scientific team carried out a lot of different areas of research, ranging from atmospheric research which entailed taking air samples, to releasing atmospheric balloons. Research was also conducted in the water, taking water samples from the ocean continuously.

Samples were taken to test for salinity, its temperature, and its density.

Shortt said once the vessel reached the ice in Antarctica, other research activities took place.

“They conducted servicing and retrieving of scientific apparatus left in the ocean in-between surveys, generally for periods of about 12 months,” he said.

 

Welcome home, cadets parade proudly as the ship enters port. Picture: SAMSA, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Welcome home, cadets parade proudly as the ship enters port. Picture: SAMSA

 

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NIMASA AND NIALS HOLD 7TH STRATEGIC ADMIRALTY LAW SEMINAR FOR JUDGES

NIMASA banner, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

The Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) says that it is taking deliberate steps to ensure working with the judiciary and other arms of government in order to reposition Nigeria’s maritime industry, and will act as a conduit to provide information and news of maritime laws affecting the sector.

NIMSA director-general Dr Dakuku Peterside was opening the 7th Strategic Admiralty Law Seminar for judges which has as its theme ‘Towards effective Admiralty in a Blue Economy’, organised jointly by NIMASA and the Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (NIALS).

Peterside said that in initiating the event, the Agency was not…

 

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CARGO OWNERS AND INSURERS WILL HAVE TO PAY MORE FOR PIRACY IN GENERAL AVERAGE

Kirsten Mullins, Associate, Norton Rose Fulbright, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Kirsten Mullins, Associate, Norton Rose Fulbright

In its October 2017 judgment in the Longchamp, the UK Supreme Court held that operating costs incurred while negotiating a ransom with pirates fell within the extra expenses allowed in general average (GA) by Rule F of the York-Antwerp (1947) Rules (the Rules). The Supreme Court has extended ship owners’ claims for GA and accordingly extended the liability of cargo owners and insurers for GA contributions.

The Rules govern the principles of general average between parties to a carriage contract. They apply to most carriage contracts by being incorporated into the contracts.

The principle of GA was explained by Gibbs CJ in The Hibernia (1816) to be the situation in which “… two or more parties are concerned in a common sea risk, and one of them makes a sacrifice for the general safety, the loss shall be assessed upon all in proportion to the share of each in the venture; and the greater sacrifice of the first shall be compensated by the contributions of the others.”

Rule A provides that, “There is a general average act when, and only when, any extraordinary sacrifice or expenditure is intentionally and reasonably made or incurred for the common safety for the purpose of preserving from peril the property involved in a common maritime adventure”.

Rule C provides that, “Only such losses, damages or expenses which are the direct consequence of the general average act shall be allowed as general average.

“Loss or damage sustained by the ship or cargo through delay…shall not be admitted as general average”.

Rule F extends GA beyond that provided at common law and in Rule A to include, “Any extra expense incurred in place of another expense which would have been allowable as general average shall be deemed to be general average and so allowed without regard to the savings, if any, to other interests, but only up to the amount of the general average expense avoided.”

The matter involved the hijacking of The Longchamp by Somalian pirates who demanded a ransom of US$ 6m for its release. The ship owners’ hired expert ransom negotiators to secure the release of the vessel. The negotiations lasted 51 days with the resultant ransom being US$ 1,85m.

During the course of the 51 day negotiation period, the ship owners’ incurred vessel-operating expenses to the value of US$ 160,000 in the form of crew wages, high risk area bonuses, food and supplies and bunkers. They claimed these as vessel operating expenses under Rule F on the basis that they were additional expenses incurred in substitution of the immediate payment of the initial ransom paid.

The majority judgment of Lord Neuberger in the Supreme Court upheld the appeal of the ship owners’ on the basis that the reference in Rule F to “…another expense which would have been allowable as general average” was a reference to the nature of the expense and not the amount of the expense. Therefore regardless of whether or not the amount of US$ 6m would have been ‘reasonably made’, the payment of the ransom was a GA act in nature and hence the vessel-operating expenses were claimable under Rule F. It was held further that the provision at the end of Rule F, “…only up to the amount of the general average expense avoided”, acted as a cap on the actual expense and accordingly addressed the quantum limits.

Lord Neuberger also addressed the common practice adopted by average adjusters to view the wording “extra expense” in Rule F as requiring a different course of action to be taken to that of the GA act and said that he was not of the view that the Rules required this. He held further that the payment of US$ 6m and the negotiation process with a resultant lesser payment of US$ 1,85m were two different courses of action and not simply a variant of one course of action as the cargo interests had contended.

The judgment is an important one for cargo owners and insurers in South Africa. The majority of GA adjustments take place in England subject to English law and accordingly this judgement will increase the amount of GA payable by cargo interests in a piracy situation. Although piracy incidents have declined lately, this may be a temporary lull and cargo owners and, more importantly, insurers who pay the GA contributions are advised to bear this decision and its effects in mind. This is particularly when insuring goods passing through active piracy areas which, at the moment, are mainly the South China Sea and the seas off West Africa.

By Kirsten Mullins
Associate, Norton Rose Fulbright

 

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COUNTERFEIT GOODS WORTH NEARLY US$1 MILLION SEIZED AT MOMBASA PORT

Bags of Kakira sugar, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Bags of Kakira sugar

Kenya’s Bureau of Standards (KEBS) has intercepted contraband worth KSh100 million (US$987,700) in a raid conducted at the port of Mombasa.

The discovery of counterfeit goods and illicit imports came as part of the government’s crackdown on smuggling of fake goods that has flooded the Kenyan market.

Included in the seized goods was sugar valued at Sh30 million (US$296,000), shoes worth…

 

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ISUZU MOTORS EASTERN CAPE INVESTMENT A BOOST FOR SOUTH AFRICA

Isuzu's SUV entry, the MUX utility vehicle, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Isuzu’s SUV entry, the MUX utility vehicle

The South African economy has received a major boost with the Isuzu Motors purchase of the Struandale (former General Motors) plant in Port Elizabeth.

In a statement on Sunday, the Department of Trade and Industry (dti) said the launch of the plant will boost investor confidence in the country.

Last year, Isuzu announced it would purchase the light commercial vehicle operations in Port Elizabeth as well as the balance of shareholding in its Isuzu Trucks South Africa operations.

The Japanese manufacturer purchased the Struandale plant, which belonged to General Motors. General Motors in May 2017 announced that it was disinvesting in South Africa. The move, it said at the time, was part of a broader, international strategic restructuring position by the company to exit certain markets.

Isuzu Motors, consolidated into one business now known as Isuzu Motors South Africa (IMSA), became effective from…

 

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ICHCA PUBLISHES DETAILS OF INNOVATIVE SUPPLY CHAIN SAFETY MEASURES

appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

ICHCA International has just published a digest of entries to the 2nd TT Club Innovation in Safety Award, comprising no fewer than twenty-two effective improvements to supply chain practices

Presented at ICHCA’s 65th anniversary conference last year, the 2nd TT Club Innovation in Safety Award aimed to highlight the importance of safety at a time of increased operational demands on the cargo handling infrastructure and operations worldwide. The Award, open to any individual or organisation involved in cargo logistics around the world, required entrants to show that a product, idea, solution, process, scheme or other innovation had resulted in a demonstrable improvement to safety. The range of entries displayed both a great diversity of safety issues, as well as tremendous passion, effort and ingenuity.

Welcoming the digest’s publication..

 

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GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

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EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

 

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

 

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

 

PICS OF THE DAY : CHINESE NAVAL SHIPS IN CAPE TOWN, CNS YUEYANG 575 and CNS QINGHAIHU 885

Yueyang 575 in Cape Town Pictures: Ian Shiffman, appearing with Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Qinghaihu in Cape Town, picture by Ian Shiffman, appearing with Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Chinese naval ships in Cape Town, Yueyang (top) and replenishment support ship Qinghaihu (middle and lower). Pictures by Ian Shiffman. Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Chinese naval ships in Cape Town, Yueyang (top) and replenishment support ship Qinghaihu (middle and lower). Pictures are by Ian Shiffman

Three Chinese naval ships, the destroyer HAIKOU 171, the frigate YUEYANG 575, and the support ship QINGHAIHU 885, have arrived in Cape Town for a short visit – see ‘First Pic’ above. Yueyang 575 is a type 054A class multi-role frigate of 4053 tons displacement. The type of which at least 23 are in service with the Chinese Navy, first entered service from 2008, though Yueyang is a much more recent building. The 37,000-ton support ship CNS QINGHAIHU (pennant 885) was originally laid down in the Ukraine as a merchant Soviet Navy merchant tanker but was not completed due to a shortage of funds. The unfinished ship was sold to China from the Ukraine in 1993 and completed as a naval support vessel (oiler). The three ships in the flotilla now in Cape Town have been doing duty in the Gulf of Aden region and are thought to be returning home on completion of that deployment. These pictures by Ian Shiffman

 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“One day, someone showed me a glass of water that was half full. And he said, “Is it half full or half empty?” So I drank the water. No more problem.”
– Alexander Jodorowsky

 

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