Africa PORTS & SHIPS Maritime News

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002
Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

Click on headline to go direct to story : use the BACK key to return

SEND NEWS REPORTS AND PRESS RELEASES TO
info@africaports.co.za

News continues below

FIRST VIEW: FRISIA AMSTERDAM

Frisia Amsterdam departing from Durban. Picture: Trevor Jones, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Frisia Amsterdam. Picture: Trevor Jones

The container ship FRISIA AMSTERDAM (39,241-dwt) departs from the port of Durban in this scene taken earlier this week. Built in 2007 at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyards Ltd Co shipyard in South Korea as hull number 0449, the 221-metres long, 30m wide ship has a container capacity of 2824 TEU. The ship is owned by Germany’s Hartmann Schiffahrt and has previously operated with Evergreen Shipping under the Ital fleet as ITAL OTTIMA. As can be observed from the majority of her containers, she is currently in the employ of Maersk Line. This picture is by Trevor Jones

 

News continues below

SERIOUS CHALLENGES –- AND OPPORTUNITIES -– FOR SOUTH AFRICA’S MARITIME ECONOMY

MARITIME EXPERTS: World Maritime University president Dr Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry (left) and South African International Maritime Institute CEO Professor Malek Pourzanjani (right) at the national Maritime Education and Training conference at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Picture: Tanya Europa, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
MARITIME EXPERTS: World Maritime University president Dr Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry (left) and South African International Maritime Institute CEO Professor Malek Pourzanjani (right) at the national Maritime Education and Training conference at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Picture: Tanya Europa

COUNTRY MUST ADAPT TO DIGITAL REVOLUTION, INTERNATIONAL EXPERTS WARN

CAPE TOWN – A predicted global shortage of 150,000 seafarers by 2025 and the exponential pace of technological development will produce serious skills development challenges, and opportunities, for the South African maritime economy, experts have warned.

Speaking at the SA International Maritime Institute’s (SAIMI) Maritime Education and Training conference in Cape Town on Wednesday, World Maritime University president Dr Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry highlighted the urgency of the situation and cautioned all industry players to adjust their sails and “think collaboratively instead of competitively.

“There is significant disruption on the horizon. Many of the jobs currently available are forecast to become obsolete a few years from now. On the plus side, many new jobs will be created,” said Doumbia-Henry.

“As maritime countries, we should examine the needs of new technologies and tailor our maritime education to meet these needs and those for a sustainable future. It is not enough, and short sighted, to educate tomorrow’s leaders based on today’s labour market.”

Under the national government’s Operation Phakisa, the oceans economy is predicted to contribute R177 billion to the GDP and between 800,000 and one million direct jobs by 2033. The ‘Maritime Education and Training in a Digital Era’ conference brings together maritime industry players, government stakeholders and education providers to examine the impact of technology on the education and training of the country’s future maritime workforce.

SAIMI chief executive Professor Malek Pourzanjani said the maritime sector had a vital role to play in addressing the country’s unemployment and job creation challenges, but that skills development needed to keep up with the global digital demand.

“The digital revolution has changed all our lives. We must explore the changes required in maritime education and training to align with technological developments and meet global best practice standards,” said Pourzanjani.

He said technology would also play a key role as the medium of instruction, with the rise of e-learning, distance-based learning and simulator training.

Pictured at the national Maritime Education and Training Conference at CPUT are, from left, Glenn Mattas (Wartsila Africa), Dr Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry (World Maritime University), Professor Malek Pourzanjani (SA International Maritime Institute) and Sobantu Tilayi (SA Maritime Safety Authority). Picture: Tanya Europa, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Pictured at the national Maritime Education and Training Conference at CPUT are, from left, Glenn Mattas (Wartsila Africa), Dr Cleopatra Doumbia-Henry (World Maritime University), Professor Malek Pourzanjani (SA International Maritime Institute) and Sobantu Tilayi (SA Maritime Safety Authority). Picture: Tanya Europa

Some of the specific impediments to SA’s participation in the global oceans economy highlighted by speakers on the opening day of the conference included significant skills gaps, inadequate recruitment and the need to update the ongoing competencies of active seafarers.

While technology would lead to fewer on-board crew jobs in the future, marine manufacturer Wartsila’s Mattheo Natali said many more on-shore jobs would be created, involving intelligent data management, cyber security and the like, which enable ships to operate more efficiently, safely and securely.

Danish Maritime Authority expert Andreas Nordseth predicted that the world was “at the doorstep of a third technology jump”, explaining that there had only been two such jumps in shipping history – the shift from wind to engine power and the rise of containerisation.

While digitalisation, smart and autonomous ships presented “an ocean of opportunities”, Nordseth said regulatory bodies had not been able to keep pace with developments and that seafarer training was fast becoming outdated – focusing on subjects such as celestial navigation, but not on future dangers such as cyber security risks.

According to Nick Chubb of the UK-based Marine Society College, the speed of this advancement means that lifelong learning is the new minimum standard.

“The rise in smart shipping is creating a need for specialised, highly educated and better trained seafarers, with technology making courses more cost effective (via apps and online courses) and available to millions.”

The conference, organised by SAIMI, is taking place at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology in Cape Town and concludes today.

About SAIMI:

SAIMI is a direct outcome of national government’s Operation Phakisa, with a core focus on the oceans economy. The institute’s mandate is to coordinate maritime skills development, education, research and innovation to support Operation Phakisa initiatives aimed at growing South Africa’s participation in the maritime economy. SAIMI has its headquarters in Port Elizabeth, and works nationally with stakeholders in maritime education, industry and government. More info is available at www.saimi.co.za

 

News continues below

 

UGANDA/TANZANIA ONE STOP BORDER POST (OSBP) AT MUTUKULA OFFICIALLY OPENS

location of latest One Stop Border Crossing at Mutukula, appearing with Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
location of latest One Stop Border Crossing at Mutukula

President John Magufuli of Tanzania and Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni were joined by the East African Community Secretary General, Ambassador Liberat Mfumukeko to help perform the honours.

Construction of the Mutukula OSBP was carried out with funding of US$11.7 million from the United Kingdom through the Department for International Development (DFID) while the systems and other related soft infrastructure equivalent to US$1.2 million was funded by the Government of Canada, through Global Affairs, Canada.

The OSBP investment includes…

 

News continues below

BAGAMOYO PORT AND SPECIAL ECONOMIC ZONE GETS GOVT GO-AHEAD

Proposed layout of the future Bagamoyo special economic zone, appearing with Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Proposed layout of the future Bagamoyo special economic zone

The go-ahead for the construction and development of the Bagamoyo Special Economic Zone has been granted by the Tanzanian government by way of a formal letter handed to the managing director of China Merchants Port, Bai Jingtao.

China Merchants Port will be developing the Bagamoyo special economic zone jointly with partners in Oman.

“With the approval by the Cabinet meeting, the Tanzanian government formally agreed and accepted the comprehensive proposal submitted by the China Merchants Port and the Oman Sovereign Fund on 31 March this year,” said the Tanzania Ambassador to China.

The formal approval by the government represented a…

 

News continues below

NIGERIAN PIRATES TAKE HOSTAGES OFF BULK CARRIER VENUS BAY

Venus Bay, latest ship to be attacked by pirates in the Gulf of Guinea. Picture: Shipspotting
Venus Bay, latest ship to be attacked by pirates in the Gulf of Guinea. Picture: Shipspotting

Pirates operating out of Nigerian waters attacked and boarded a bulk carrier VENUS BAY on 11 November, kidnapping ten hostages when leaving the ship.

The armed pirates attacked the vessel shortly before 08h30 in position 04 07N 007 00E, about 23 miles south of Bonny in the Gulf of Guinea.

After penetrating the bridge of the ship the pirates opened fire, breaking windows, before proceeding to steal cash and belongings from the ship’s crew. They then made ready to leave…

 

News continues below

FRENCH SHIPBUILDER PIRIOU SETS UP NAVAL SHIPYARD IN SENEGAL

90 metre tuna purse seiner built by Piriou, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
90 metre tuna purse seiner built by Piriou

Following the establishment of the West Atlantic Shipyard in Nigeria in 2004, then in Vietnam in 2006 and in Algeria in 2013, France’s Piriou group has continued with its international development programme and has set up a ship repair yard in Senegal.

Piriou has partnered with Ngom & Freres to create Piriou Ngom Senegal, with Mr Ababacar Ngom, appointed as managing director.

Ngom has been involved in the Senegalese maritime sector for over 20 years. The new company provides…

 

News continues below

NSRI CALLED OUT FOR MEDIVAC OF PATIENTS AT SEA

Going alongside the bulker off Port Elizabeth. Picture: NSRI, appearing with Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Going alongside the bulker off Port Elizabeth. Picture: NSRI

The National Sea rescue Institute (NSRI) has been called out on two occasions this week to undertake medivacs of patients from ships at sea.

At 07h00 on Wednesday 15 November, NSRI Agulhas station 30 was requested to launch and rendezvous with the deep-sea fishing trawler BASANI, 10 nautical miles south of Struisbaai.

After making the rendezvous, a 39 year old male crewman, suffering dehydration, was taken aboard the sea rescue craft and taken ashore to Struisbaai without incident where…

 

News continues below

REPLENISHMENT AT SEA

US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael H Lehman/Released ©USN, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Michael H Lehman/Released ©USN

US Navy’s Atlantic Ocean deployment

We publish this short report as much for the quality of the accompanying photograph as for the relevance of this example of refuelling at sea.

Our picture shows a fuelling probe sent from the crew of the fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) to a fuelling sponson aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) during replenishment at sea, otherwise known as a RAS.

This commonplace evolution takes place on the world’s ocean, day and night, year round, in most weathers and becomes second nature to the navies of the day.

For a filmed example of a RAS between USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and USNS Rainier (T-AOE 7): CLICK HERE

Iwo Jima, components of the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit are conducting a Combined Composite Training Unit Exercise that is the culmination of training for the Navy-Marine Corps team and will certify them for deployment.

This illustration was kindly provided by the US Navy as part of its Atlantic Ocean deployment news service on 14 November.

Reported by Paul Ridgway
London

 

News continues below

PRESS RELEASES

Send your Press Releases here info@africaports.co.za and marked PRESS RELEASE. Provided they are considered appropriate to our readers we will either turn them into a story, or publish them here.

INFRASTRUCTURE & TECHNOLOGY WILL SHAPE AFRICA’S FUTURE

Infrastructure, with technology the key to Africa's growth, appearing with Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Infrastructure, with technology the key to Africa’s growth

Following a sharp slowdown over the past two years, recovery is now underway in Sub-Saharan Africa. GDP growth in the region is expected to strengthen to 2.4 per cent in 2017 from 1.3 per cent in 2016, according to the October edition of Africa’s Pulse, a bi-annual analysis conducted by The World Bank.

Nigeria and South Africa, the continent’s two largest economies, are leading the rebound and, looking further ahead, The World Bank forecasts that growth across Sub-Saharan Africa will rise to 3.2% in 2018 and 3.5% in 2019. This is encouraging news. But growth is patchy across the region, remains well below the pre-crisis average and is “weak in several key dimensions” cautions World Bank Chief Economist for Africa, Albert Zeufack – notably low investment growth and falling productivity growth.

“This calls for more sweeping structural reforms that can help ensure that economic growth is anchored on a strong footing,” he says. His comments are echoed by Akinwumi Adesina, President of the African Development Bank, quoted in a recent article by The Economist, who observes: “It requires a major effort to fix structural problems as well as infrastructural problems in Africa.”

How to tackle structural and infrastructural barriers to trade, both within Africa and between Africa and the rest of the world, will be at the heart of the debate at the upcoming TOC Africa conference in Durban, 5-6 December. That includes both hard infrastructure – the power, telecommunications and transport networks needed to make industry and trade work efficiently – and the soft infrastructure in the shape of the paperwork and processes that accompany every physical goods movement.

As Ziad Hamoui, Ghana National President for the Borderless Alliance and a speaker at TOC Africa, observes in a recent editorial on LinkedIn: “By improving the local and regional transport infrastructure, enhancing governance and accountability, creating a more enabling business environment for local companies to grow, prosper and compete and, most importantly, removing the multiple barriers to regional trade and transport that plague the continent, Africa will begin to increase its share of inter and intra-regional trade.”

In terms of removing trade barriers, the African Union’s Continental Free Trade Area, designed to boost intra-Africa trade, and the World Trade Organization’s Trade Facilitation Agreement, which came into force in February 2017, are both significant steps towards simplifying, modernising and harmonising export and import processes.

Technology will have a significant role to play in realising the benefits of such reforms. Collaborative e-platforms, mobile money transfer and financing solutions like M-Pesa, real-time remote tracking technology and a host of new cloud and smartphone applications can help “reduce some of the costs and frictions of doing business in Africa” – as The Economist puts it.

But technology is not a panacea and does not negate the need for serious investment in hard infrastructure – the seaports, road and rail transport systems connecting African nations with each other and the rest of the world. Harvard professor Calestous Juma argues that “infrastructure is both the backbone of the economy and the motherboard of technological innovation” and that “African countries need adequate infrastructure to realise their full potential.”

Congestion and poor productivity in ports and hinterland networks cost Africa dearly in more ways than one. Addressing this mammoth challenge will require huge funding and expertise that governments alone simply cannot provide. So, creating the right structural framework for private sector investment by African and overseas interests will be crucial. FDI in Africa has dropped since the financial crisis and this clearly needs to be addressed.

The recent news of DP World’s Somaliland port and freezone investment is one encouraging example and attendees at TOC Africa will hear first-hand from a range of private sector investors across the continent. That includes global and regional terminal operators such as DP World and ICTSI, private developers and operators of port logistics clusters and corridors including South Africa’s Dube Tradeport, Maputo and Walvis Bay Logistics Corridors, plus investors including veteran private equity fund management African Infrastructure Investment Managers and new online investment platform Afriscaper.

TOC Africa runs between 5-6 December at the ICC Durban, South Africa. See Africa PORTS & SHIPS’ Events Diary for details CLICK HERE

 

News continues below

GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

in partnership with – APO

 

News continues below

TO ADVERTISE HERE

Request a Rate Card from info@africaports.co.za

 

EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

 

News continues below

CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

 

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

 

PIC OF THE DAY : ATLANTIC KLIPPER

Atlantic Klipper arriving in Durban. Picture: Keith Betts, appearingin Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Atlantic Klipper at Durban for bunkers. Picture: Keith Betts, appearing in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Atlantic Klipper. Picture: Keith Betts

Seatrade’s refrigerated ‘reefer’ vessel ATLANTIC KLIPPER (15,692-dwt) brings this edition to a close. The ship is shown here arriving with a significant number of reefer containers on board before docking at a laybye berth to take bunkers. Owned and managed by Seatrade Groningen of The Netherlands, Atlantic Klipper was built in 2011 at the Kitanihon Shipbuilding shipyard in Hachinohe, Japan. She flies the Netherlands flag, being homeported in Scheveningen. These pictures are by Keith Betts

 

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Love is holy because it is like grace–the worthiness of its object is never really what matters.”
― Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

ADVERTISING

For a Rate Card please contact us at info@africaports.co.za

Don’t forget to send us your news and press releases for inclusion in the News Bulletins. Shipping related pictures submitted by readers are always welcome. Email to info@africaports.co.za

TABLE BAY UNDERWAY SHIPPING
SHIP PHOTOGRAPHERS
Colour photographs and slides for sale of a variety of ships.

Thousands of items listed featuring famous passenger liners of the past to cruise ships of today, freighters, container vessels, tankers, bulkers, naval and research vessels.

P O BOX 809, CAPE TOWN, 8000, SOUTH AFRICA
snai@worldonline.co.za
http://home.worldonline.co.za/~snai

 

South Africa’s most comprehensive Directory of Maritime Services will shortly be listed on this site. Please advise if you’d like your company to be included. To sign up for a free listing contact info@africaports.co.za or register online