Africa PORTS & SHIPS Maritime News

Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

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FIRST VIEW: HÖEGH BRASILIA

Hoegh Brasilia and Lufafa

Car carrier Hoegh Brasilia
Höegh Brasilia. Pictures: Keith Betts

Another of the Höegh Autoliners pure car carriers to visit Durban during April was the 200 metre long, 32m wide HÖEGH BRASILIA (51,731-gt), seen in the upper photograph with the pilot boat LUFAFA also making its way into harbour. For the sake of those who prefer their ship photographs to be ‘uncluttered’ by other craft, the car carrier is shown in the lower picture after the pilot boat had moved on ahead. Built in 2007 at the Tsuneishi Heavy Industries shipyard in Balamban, Philippines, she flies the Panamanian flag and is owned by Kambara Kisen of Fukuyama, Japan, and is managed by Union Marine Management Services based in Singapore. The ship is of course in service with Höegh Autoliners. These pictures are by Keith Betts

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LIBERIA’S THIRD PORT, SINOE, IS BACK IN BUSINESS

Sinoe Port
Greenville port tugs

After a hiatus of about 18 years, the port of Sinoe, Liberia’s third largest, has handled its first ship since the start of the second civil war in 1999.

The port of Sinoe, also known as Greenville, has a basic facility composed of two quays, one 180 metres long and the other 70 metres. The port has traditionally handled the export of…

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GIGABA SAYS AFRICA MUST TRADE WITH ITSELF

World Economic Forum Africa banner

As the World Economic Forum on Africa (WEFA) draws to an end on Friday, South Africa’s Finance Minister Malusi Gigaba has argued that Africa should, more than ever before, trade among themselves.

Minister Gigaba says Africa must boost its intra-regional trade and…

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BOOT CONTRACT SIGNED FOR PORT OF NGQURA LIQUID BULK TERMINAL

Coega Oiltanking, Calulo, Grindrod
artists impression of the planned Ngqura development

The contract for a Build, Operate and Transfer (BOOT) agreement to construct, maintain and operate a new liquid bulk handling terminal facility at the Port of Ngqura, was ceremoniously signed in Port Elizabeth on Thursday (4 May 2017).

The concept engineering design as well as the topographical and geotechnical survey has already been completed and construction is due to commence in the 4th quarter of 2017, with commissioning planned for the 3rd quarter of 2019.

Phase 1 of the liquid bulk facility will…

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GREENPEACE CONCLUDES TOUR WITH RECOMMENDATIONS TO WEST AFRICA

Greenpeace ship
Greenpeace ship Esperanza

Greenpeace has concluded its months long ship tour with strong recommendations to West Africa states. The findings are symptomatic of West African fisheries’ desperate need for effective regulations at a regional level.

The ESPERANZA has been on a two month long expedition in West Africa to document the threat from overfishing to the marine environment and food security for millions of Africans depending on fish. The crew on board, with the support of fishing authorities from coastal countries in the West Africa, aim to reduce the number of vessels fishing illegally or committing different offense.

Eleven vessels fishing illegally were arrested in just three weeks of joint surveillance with local authorities in West African waters, reports Greenpeace.

This is out of 13 fishing regulation infractions identified during the two month Hope in West Africa ship tour, which also included fisheries monitoring and civil society and political engagement in a total of six countries. The results of Greenpeace’s ship tour, which ended in Dakar, have been compiled in a preliminary report just released.

Greenpeace says the findings are symptomatic of West African fisheries’ desperate need for effective regulations at a regional level.

In total, Greenpeace and inspectors from Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Sierra Leone and Senegal boarded and inspected 37 industrial fishing vessels in the region. In Mauritania Greenpeace conducted its own monitoring and presented the findings to the Minister of Fisheries, Mr Nani Chrougha. The 13 infractions included shark finning, incorrect net mesh sizes, transshipment at sea, lack of documentation and fishing outside of permits. The infractions were committed by fishing vessels with Chinese, Italian, Korean, Comoros and Senegalese flags.

“After two months at sea documenting and inspecting industrial fishing vessels in the waters of West Africa, it is clear that illegal fishing is worryingly common,” said Pavel Klinckhamers, Hope in West Africa project leader.

“We also found an eagerness among local fishermen, civil society and governments across the region to address the situation and move towards a sustainable fisheries system. The next step is for these stakeholders to show real commitment in working together towards that goal. We look forward to supporting that process.”

Without decision-making powers current managing bodies for the seas, from Cabo Verde to Sierra Leone, including the Sub-Regional Fisheries Commission (SRFC) and the Fishery Committee for the Eastern Central Atlantic (CECAF), can only perform insufficient advisory roles. A lack of transparency on fisheries policies and practices also blights the region. Fisheries authorities’ vessel lists are often incomplete or inaccurate, and the numbers and details of joint venture companies and fisheries access agreements in the region remains opaque.

“With West African fish stocks already in freefall, governments must act right now to ensure food security is no longer threatened by overfishing and illegal fishing,” said Ahmed Diame, Greenpeace Africa Oceans campaigner. “Fish stocks are not restricted to national boundaries, and that is why the solutions to end the overfishing of West Africa’s waters can only come from joint efforts between the countries of this region. Governments must work together to set up and implement an effective regional fisheries management system to safeguard these precious resources now and for generations to come.”

Lian Riln 34
The Chinese fishing vessel Lian Riln 34 being monitored by the Greenpeace vessel

In the latest round of joint surveillance, in Senegal, from 25 to 29 April, Greenpeace and inspectors from the Office of Fisheries Protection and Surveillance (DPSP) identified two cases of illegal fishing. The Marcantonio Bragadin, owned by a Senegalese-Italian joint venture, and Kanbal III, owned by a Senegalese-Spanish joint venture, were both caught using methods to constrict the mesh size of their nets, effectively making the net mesh smaller than the permitted size. The Marcantonio Bragadin reportedly paid a deposit of West African CFA 30 million (€ 45,700) one day later in order to continue fishing. The Kanbal III will be further investigated by the DPSP.

Greenpeace is handing its report to government representatives from Cape Verde, Mauritania, Guinea Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Senegal with strong recommendations as to how West African governments can live up to their responsibility and jointly manage both foreign and local fishing activities in order to safeguard their waters and ensure a fair and sustainable distribution of resources at sea.

In the coming months, Greenpeace will also share its findings concerning the poor working conditions on board many foreign fishing vessels, where drinking water is often in scarce supply and many local crew are left to sleep, eat and wash outside.

Greenpeace is advising that an effective regional fisheries management body be established and national fisheries policies harmonised. Transparency, including bilateral fisheries agreements, the sharing of resources to optimise Vessel Monitoring Systems for tracking fishing vessels, and the setting up of a black list of IUU vessels and non-cooperating captains in the region must be adopted by all countries.

There is an urgent need to establish a committee to monitor stock assessment and catches to bring fisheries capacity in balance with available resources. In addition, the voices of local fishing communities, those hit hardest by industrial fishing in the region, must be made central to the planning and implementation of fisheries management. With West African fish stocks plummeting, the need for such a system is urgent.

See also our earlier report on this expedition: Greenpeace and Guinea patrol intercepts foreign fishing vessels with shark fins

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AFRICAN PETROLEUM SPUDS AYAMÉ-1X EXPLORATION WELL OFF IVORY COAST

drillship West Saturn
Seadrill’s West Saturn. Picture: Shipspotting

The Ayamé-1X exploration well, offshore Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa, has been spud* using the Seadrill WEST SATURN drillship.

The spud took place on 29 April on the well, which is operated by Ophir Energy. and is located on the CI-513 license, reports Petroleum Africa

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PRESS RELEASES

Send your Press Releases here info@africaports.co.za and marked PRESS RELEASE. Provided they are considered appropriate to our readers we will either turn them into a story, or publish them here.

THORDON BEARINGS & DRYDOCKS WORLD TEAM UP TO CONVERT SHIPS TO SEAWATER LUBRICATED SHAFT LINES

Thordon seawater lubrivated seals
Thordon Bearings seawater lubricated propeller shaft system

Thordon Bearings and Drydocks World-Dubai (DDW-D) have signed a milestone agreement under which the UAE-based shipyard will work together with Thordon Bearings Inc. to promote the conversion of ships’ oil lubricated propeller shafts to Thordon’s COMPAC open seawater lubricated bearing system.

The agreement will create an action plan in which a specialist team, comprised of Drydocks World-Dubai and Thordon Bearings’ personnel, offer support to ship managers and owners looking to ensure their vessels are fully compliant with environmental legislation prohibiting the discharge of oil from the oil-to-sea interface of ships’ propeller shafts. Shipowners could face substantial financial penalties if their vessels are found to be non-compliant.

Mohammad Rizal, COO of Drydocks World-Dubai, said: “Thordon Bearings is a pioneer in water lubricated propeller shaft bearings, with over 35 years’ of experience in this technology. By entering into this partnership, we will not only have an opportunity to expand our service offering, but will also have the opportunity to provide our customers with a real, long-term solution to the environmental problems they face with oil lubricated stern tube bearings and seals. With concerns increasingly being raised about the impact oil discharges have on the marine environment, converting an oil lubricated system to seawater is the only guaranteed solution for today and tomorrow.”

Terry McGowan, President and CEO of Thordon Bearings said: “Drydocks World-Dubai is an internationally renowned shipyard with the capabilities and state-of-the-art facilities required to carry out some of the world’s most specialised ship and rig repair, maintenance and conversion projects. Having the advantage of offering comprehensive, engineered solutions in partnership with an experienced bearing manufacturer will help further strengthen Drydock World’s position as one of the world’s leading shiprepair yards.”

Leaking shaft seals are known to be a significant contributor to on-going pollution at sea. The use of biodegradable lubricants, which are an improvement over mineral oils, are still a very expensive option for shipowners and some are having seal compatibility issues. Even biodegradable lubricants still need to be reported to authorities when discharges occur. Thordon provides a solution that uses seawater as the lubricant that meets all regulations, eliminating any risk of oil pollution.

Thordon
Thordon seawater-lubcricated seal

“Seawater lubricated propeller shaft bearing systems are less complicated and time-consuming to install than oil lubricated systems, providing clear commercial advantages for the customers,” said McGowan. “There are fewer components, fewer pipe-runs and no air equipment is required with a seawater lubricated system. Plus, with recent class society rule changes, seawater lubricated propeller shaft bearing systems no longer have a pre-determined shaft withdrawals as long as certain monitoring conditions are met”

He added: “This new partnership agreement provides a win-win situation for both parties. DDW-D will stand to benefit from having new customers and a new revenue stream with oil-to-water conversions, while Thordon Bearings will benefit from supplying the COMPAC seawater lubricated bearing equipment for upcoming conversion projects.”

Under the terms of the agreement, Thordon Bearings will also provide equipment, training and guidance to Drydocks World-Dubai personnel and support the yard in carrying out propeller shaft conversion projects to the “highest standards and in the most efficient and cost effective manner”.

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EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

PICS OF THE DAY : YONG XING

general cargo ship Yong Xing

Yong Xing at Port Everglades
Yong Xing. Pictures: Tony de Freitas

The general cargo ship YONG XING (18,207-gt, built 1998), carrying a deck cargo of motor yachts of various types and sizes, departs Port Everglade in Florida USA. Owned, managed and operated by Chipolbrok (Chinese-Polish Joint Stock Shipping Co) of Shanghai, China, the ship flies the flag of Hong Kong. She has a container carrying capacity of 1096 TEUs. These pictures are by Tony de Freitas

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“When you concentrate your energy purposely on the future possibility that you aspire to realize, your energy is passed on to it and makes it attracted to you with a force stronger than the one you directed towards it.”
― Stephen Richards, Think Your way to Success: Let Your Dreams Run Free

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