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Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news 22 May 2019

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Bringing you shipping, freight, trade and transport related news of interest for Africa since 2002

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TODAY’S BULLETIN OF MARITIME NEWS

These news reports are updated on an ongoing basis. Check back regularly for the latest news as it develops – where necessary refresh your page at www.africaports.co.za

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FIRST VIEW 1: MSC PARIS

MSC Paris arriving in Durban. Picture by Trevor Jones, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online MSC Paris.      Picture by Trevor Jones

The container ship MSC PARIS (IMO 9301483) enters Durban during April this year wit what looks like a fairly large cargo of containers. Owned by Hammonia Schiffahrts and managed by Hammonia Reederei of Hamburg, the 2006-built ship is a product of the Hyundai Heavy Industries Ltd shipyard in South Korea as their hull number 1633. With a length of 335 metres, a beam of 42.8m the ship has a maximum container capacity of 7928 TEU, or 6030 TEU at an average of 14 tonnes. The 102,756-dwt MSC Paris has previously operated with the names MSC Paris (until 2011), Hammonia Hamburg until 2012 and CSAV Paris since then. This picture is by Trevor Jones

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FIRST VIEW 2: BOW JUBAIL

Bow Jubail. Pictures: Trevor Jones, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Bow Jubail. Pictures: Trevor Jones, fgeatured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Bow Jubail.     Pictures: Trevor Jones

The chemical and oil products tanker BOW JUBAIL (IMO 9087025) was a recent caller at Durban and is shown here departing from that port. The 37,499-dwt tanker has been a regular caller in the port for a number of years being part of the Norwegian Odfjell Management fleet, although this particular ship is owned by Saudi Arabia’s National Chemical Carriers. Bow Jubail was built in 1996 and has always remained under the same owner/manager arrangement.    The above pictures are by Trevor Jones

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NO INDICATION WHEN DEEPENING OF DURBAN’S DCT NORTH QUAY MIGHT GO AHEAD

DCT's North Quay - no progress with the deepening project, featured in report in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
DCT’s North Quay , berths  (from left) 203, 204 & 205- no progress with the deepening project

There is still no indication concerning when construction of the deepened, lengthened and widened North Quay berths at Durban Container Terminal will go ahead, after work was halted and the contract cancelled barely a month into startup in September/October 2018.

The contract was halted and subsequently terminated to allow a forensic audit report of…

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TWO KENYA NAVY SHIPS VISIT PORT OF MAPUTO

Kenya Navy patrol ship KNS Shupavu P3130 on a visit to Durban in 2004. Picture by Terry Hutson, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Kenya Navy patrol ship KNS Shupavu P3130 on a visit to Durban in 2004.     Picture by Terry Hutson

Two Kenyan Navy ships have been visiting the Mozambique port of Maputo* this week as part of a training exercise involving operating in international waters.

The two ships (unfortunately identities not known at this stage*) called at the Mozambique capital for a four day visit during which there were interactions with their Mozambican counterparts.

* Any details of this visit, ships’ names etc will be welcome to terry@africaports.co.za

According to the Portuguese-language newspaper O Pais, one of the reasons for the visit was for the Kenyan Navy to be able to interact with the Mozambique Navy in matters of common interest, including operations at sea in the Mozambique Channel.

A second reason is to strengthen ties with Mozambique and its armed forces as well as to provide the opportunity of training together.

The paper reported that prior to arriving in Maputo the two naval ships had visited Madagascar.

From Mozambique they are due to head to other ports along the African coast – details of which are not available at this time.

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PIRATED SHIP APECUS HAS A CHECKERED AND ILLEGAL HISTORY, SAYS NIMASA

Tanker currently named Apecus and subject to a recent attack by pirates, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Tanker currently named Apecus and subject to a recent attack by pirates

While authorities and others try to negotiate the release of five crew members of the 3,075-dwt tanker APECUS (IMO 7333810) who were abducted by pirates * as the vessel lay at anchor off the coast of Bonny Island on 19 April, the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) says it has identified the vessel as having an illegal background.

* See our earlier report OIL TANKER APECUS CREW REMAIN AS HOSTAGES AS OWNERS NEGOTIATE WITH PIRATES

While expressing sympathy for the missing seafarers and having agreed to collaborate fully with the Nigerian Navy and other interested parties in seeking the release of the men, NIMASA director-general Dr Dakuku Peterside said that investigations have revealed the vessel as an illegal operator.

Dr Peterside said the Apecus has been conducting trading activities…

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MOZAMBIQUE PORT OPERATORS ASSOCIATION IS FORMED

Fernando Couto, first president of Mozambique Port Operators Association, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Fernando Couto, first president of Mozambique Port Operators Association

Port operators in Mozambique have formed a body to represent and promote their interests. The new organisation is known as the Mozambique Port Operators Association (MPOA).

The establishment of an association has been a dream of several port operators who for the past six years have attempted to get such an organisation underway.

Only now has it been possible for…

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MOSSEL BAY CHARITY FISHING COMPETITION PLANNED FOR YOUTH MONTH

Previously hosted Charity Fishing Competition hosted at the Port of Mossel Bay in January 2019, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Previously hosted Charity Fishing Competition hosted at the Port of Mossel Bay in January 2019

Transnet National Ports Authority’s Port of Mossel Bay intends holding a charity fishing competition in honour of Youth Month on 29 June 2019.

The competition has as its aim the raising of funds that will be used by the purchase of sanitary pads to help underprivileged girls stay in school. The sanitary pad outreach programme is hosted by local non-profit organisation, the Call – People of Action, and all proceeds from the competition will go towards needy learners at Groot Brak Secondary School in Great Brak River.

Port manager, Shadrack Tshikalange said the event was planned to coincide with…

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USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN & USS KEARSARGE NAVAL GROUPS JOINT OPS IN ARABIAN SEA

Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ABECSG) and Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (KSGARG) conduct joint operations in the Arabian Sea, part of the US 5th Fleet’s area of operations. The ABECSG and KSGARG, with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, are prepared to respond to contingencies and to defend US forces and interests in the region. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Catie Coyle/Released. USN ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ABECSG) and Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (KSGARG) conduct joint operations in the Arabian Sea, part of the US 5th Fleet’s area of operations. The ABECSG and KSGARG, with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, are prepared to respond to contingencies and to defend US forces and interests in the region. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Catie Coyle/Released. USN ©

On 19 May the US Navy News Service reported that the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group (ABECSG) and the Kearsarge Amphibious Ready Group (KSGARG), with the embarked 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), conducted joint operations on 17 / 18 May in the Arabian Sea, part of the US 5th Fleet’s area of responsibility.

That sea area encompasses about 2.5 million square miles of ocean and includes the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Gulf of Aden, Red Sea, and the Arabian Sea.

This expanse includes three critical choke points at the Strait of Hormuz, the Suez Canal and the Strait of Bab al Mandeb at the southern tip of Yemen.

According to Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Catie Coyle of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs, after the ABECSG deployed to the region in response to credible threat indicators, these operations referred to above highlight the…

Edited by Paul Ridgway
London

An MV-22 Osprey from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM-264) prepares to land on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tristan Kyle Labuguen/Released. ©, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
An MV-22 Osprey from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM-264) prepares to land on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tristan Kyle Labuguen/Released. ©

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CARBON TAX BILL TO CUT EMISSIONS IN SOUTH AFRICA FROM 1 JUNE 2019

Carbon emission taxes aboutto be introduced, feature in report carried by Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

By Tina Costas and James Ross
Norton Rose Fulbright South Africa

South Africa’s carbon emissions are disproportionately high.

There are various causes, the primary one being the country’s reliance on coal in energy generation. To minimise emissions, South Africa has made several international and national commitments to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

The carbon tax, through the 2018 Carbon Tax Bill, will introduce the “polluter-pays principle”. This principle incorporates the costs of damage caused by greenhouse gases into the price of high carbon-emitting goods and services. It should change consumer behaviour and encourage investors to shift towards low carbon options.

The law, announced in the 2019 Budget Speech, comes into effect on 1 June 2019. It will operate in two phases – the first from 1 June 2019 to 31 December 2022, the second phase from 2023 to 2030.

Companies, individuals and public entities will be liable to pay the carbon tax if conducting an activity that results in the emission of GHGs above the prescribed emission thresholds. The greenhouse gases covered include carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons and sulphur hexafluoride.

The three general categories of emissions specified are fuel combustion, industrial processes, and fugitive emissions. The emissions thresholds for these categories are set out in Schedule 2 of the Bill, and are sector specific.

The tax is measured per ton of CO2 or CO2 equivalent. The headline tax rate is R120 per ton of CO2 equivalent. This rate is subject to inflation plus 2% until end of phase 1, and will then be increased in line with inflation. The headline rate is subject to a number of tax breaks in the form of allowances and performance incentives. These offsets provide a baseline tax break of 60%, and a maximum tax break of 95% during phase 1. The tax breaks create an effective carbon tax rate of between R6/t and R48/t for carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2e) emissions during phase 1.

The National Treasury has advised that energy-intensive sectors will be “cushioned” through measures that have been introduced to ensure that the tax does not raise the price of electricity. This will supposedly be achieved through a tax credit for the renewable-energy premium built into the electricity tariffs, as well as a credit for the existing electricity generation levy.

According to a statement from the Treasury, the South African Reserve Bank (SARS) will publish draft rules for consultation, which will regulate carbon offsets, trade exposure regulations, and benchmarking. The performance and operational structure of the tax will be reviewed after three years.

The impacts on industry will vary by sector. The average consumer will feel the impact of direct and indirect costs as the price of goods and services rise. The tax will cause a fuel increase of 9 c/l on petrol and 10c/l on diesel as of 1 June 2019.

South Africa is also a signatory to the 2015 Paris Agreement, enforced in November 2016, which requests signatories to outline and communicate their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) or post-2020 climate actions.

Parties to the Agreement are obliged to report regularly on their emissions and reduction efforts. South Africa’s NDC was submitted on 1 August 2015, and will be assessed during the global stocktake every 5 years after implementation, from 2020. South Africa’s NDC identifies a carbon tax as a measure to achieve the “absolute decline of GHGs from 2040”.

Under its national commitment, GHG emissions are expected to peak between 2020 and 2025, plateau between 2025 and 2035, and then decline.

Businesses should assess the extent of their exposure to the tax and act accordingly. As an example, price increases on taxable activities such as transport could necessitate a supply chain review. Additionally, implementation of any mitigation measures to minimise the impact of the tax should be accomplished during phase 1, since the operational specifics of phase 2 are still uncertain.

Finally, and on a positive note, the intention to move away from carbon reliance, and the recent structural changes within Eskom, may create an opportunity for investors in the field of renewable energy and assorted green industries.

* see related article ANGLO AMERICAN PERFORMS FIRST CARBON OFFSET IRON ORE SHIPMENT FROM SOUTH AFRICA TO EUROPE

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GERMANY TO RETURN HISTORIC 15TH CENTURY CAPE CROSS NAVIGATION LANDMARK TO NAMIBIA

The Cape Cross padrao at the museum in Germany, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The Cape Cross padrao at the museum in Germany

A historic and important 15th Century navigational padrao, a stone cross erected by the Portuguese explorers as a landmark on a promontory of the southern African coast that came to be known as Cape Cross in what is now Namibia, is to be returned to the southern African country by a German museum.

This was announced a week ago by Germany’s Culture Minister, Monika Gruetters. “The restitution of the Stone Cross of Cape Cross is a clear signal that we are committed to coming to terms with our colonial past,” she said.

The minister said that for too many decades, the colonial time has been a blind spot in Germany’s remembrance culture.

The stone cross was placed on the south-west African coast in 1486 and from 1500 onwards has been shown clearly on maps as Cape Cross.

When the Portuguese explorers sailed along the African Atlantic coast seeking a way into the Indian Ocean that could open up trade with India and the Far East, they left large heavy stone cross markers or padraos at significant places, often natural headlands along the coast but also sometimes at places marking the extent of each voyage.

The replica padrao that currently occupies a prominent position at Cape Cross. Picture: courtesy Wikipedia, as featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The replica padrao that currently occupies a prominent position at Cape Cross. Picture: courtesy Wikipedia

Cape Cross was planted in 1486 by the Portuguese explorer Diogo Cão in 1486 – Cão reached as far south as 22°10′ S before turning back. He was followed two years later by Bartolomeu Dias, who succeeded in becoming the first European to round the southernmost tip of Africa and sailing into the Indian Ocean.

Dias only went as far as present day Algoa Bay before he turned back, leaving the glory of opening a trade route to India to Vasco da Gama.

The padrao at Cape Cross remained in situ until the 1890s when the occupying Germans removed it to Germany. In 2006 the 3.5 metre high cross, which weighs 1.1 tonnes, went on display at the the German Historical Museum in Berlin.

In 2017 the Namibian authorities began requesting its return, which has now been acceded to and could be the start of a return to Namibia of other artefacts and human remains.

Namibian ambassador to Germany, Andreas Guibeb said the return of the cross is “important as a step for us to reconcile with our colonial past and the trail of humiliation and systematic injustice that it left behind.”

The planned return of the padrao from Cape Cross could mark the beginning of many other artefacts that were removed from African colonies to museums and private collections across Europe, something that is increasingly being demanded by the former colonies in Africa.

The museum that has agreed to return the 500-year cross pointed out that although the cross in not of African origin, it did highlight how “descendants from Europe and Africa can engage in dialogue that does historical justice” to it.
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The museum also acknowledged the outstanding significance an artefact like this padrao has to the people of Namibia and the special contribution it can make on site in the future to understanding Namibia’s history.

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BOAT TRAGEDY ON LAKE ALBERT LEAVES MORE THAN 30 DEAD


Video clip of the aftermath of the boating tragedy on Lake Albert [1:35]

A passenger-carrying boat with over 50 people on board has capsized and sunk on Lake Albert leaving more than 30 people dead.

The boat was carrying celebrating football players and fans from the Fofo Landing Site in Buseruka sub-county to Runga in Hoima District but got no further than about 300 metres from its starting point when the boat capsized, throwing everybody on board into the water.

Eyewitnesses said the cause of the capsizing may have been…

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MARKING WORLD SAFETY & HEALTH DAY AT WORK IN PORT OF DURBAN

The port’s safety mascot iSenzo was part of last Friday's commemoration at Durban Harbour, where Acting Port Manager Nokuzola Nkowane addressed port employees on the day. iSenzo is the funny looking guy left of centre in the back row. You'll notice him again in the picture lower down, standing next to the acting port manager, Nokuzola Nkowane. Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
The port’s safety mascot iSenzo was part of last Friday’s commemoration at Durban Harbour, where Acting Port Manager Nokuzola Nkowane addressed port employees on the day. iSenzo is the funny looking guy left of centre in the back row. You’ll notice him again in the picture lower down, standing next to the acting port manager, Nokuzola Nkowane

Transnet National Ports Authority at the Port of Durban chose last Friday, 17 May to rally port employees together for World Day for Safety & Health at Work.

In case you are wondering, this is the International Labour Organisation’s (ILO) global day usually observed on 28 April each year,but postponing its own observation to a weekday event allowed the port authority to reach more employees about this important issue.

This year is also the 100th anniversary of the World Health and Safety Day at Work.

“This year the International Labour Organization’s theme for World Day for Safety and Health is ‘A Safe and Healthy Future of Work’, said Durban’s Acting Port Manager, Nokuzola Nkowane.

“This theme is about celebrating and building on the wealth of knowledge and action accumulated over 100 years, as we get ready to face and appreciate the changes brought forward by the future of work, such as changing work arrangements, technology, demographics, globalisation, climate change, and other drivers,” she said.

Port mascot iSenzo and port manager Nokuzola Nkowane and staff taking part in the World Day for Safety & Health at Work at the Port of Durban, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Port of Durban employees were invited to view real-world first aid simulations and vessel evacuation procedures alongside the port’s N-shed passenger terminal. There were demonstrations of the correct protocol for dealing with electrical incidents in the port environment

Nkowane said TNPA was striving to reduce disabling injuries in the workplace through programmes such as its ZERO HARM initiative.

“We must all commit to improving our knowledge of occupational safety, health and environment in the workplace so that we can protect ourselves, our colleagues and those we come into contact with in the Port of Durban,” she said.

Durban port employees were invited to view real-world first aid simulations and vessel evacuation procedures.

Demonstrations of safety drills were part of the day's events. Featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news
Demonstrations involving safety drills and simulations were part of the day’s events.

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FIRE ON BOARD A SECOND GRIMALDI CAR CARRIER RORO

Grande Europa. Picture: courtesy Salvamento Maritimo, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online
Grande Europa.      Picture: courtesy Salvamento Maritimo

Following another two fires that broke out on board another of their RoRo car carriers last week 15 May, the Grimaldi Group has called for more stringent controls and regulations on rolling cargo units and containers.

In March this year Grimaldi lost their RoRo car carrier vessel GRANDE AMERICA* which caught fire in the Bay of Biscay and later sank near the French Atlantic coast. The latest fire last week…

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CMA CGM HIKES SHIPPING RATES FROM ASIA TO AFRICA US 4300-400

CMA CGM Tigris arriving in Durban. Picture by Trevor Jones, gfeatured in article in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online CMA CGM Tigris arriving in Durban.    Picture by Trevor Jones

French shipping line CMA CGM is to levy rate increases on cargo between Asia and Africa as from 1 June, the company said in a statement.

Asia to South Africa:

A US$400 per TEU increase is to be charged on all cargo dry, reefer, OOG and breakbulk from Asia including China, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia to all ports in South Africa.

Kenya and Tanzania:

CMA CGM will levy a US$300 per TEU increase on all cargo dry, reefer, OOG and breakbulk from Asia including China, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan and Southeast Asia to both countries, also commencing from 1 June 2019.

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CMA CGM SEASONAL ADJUSTMENTS TO NOURA EAST AFRICAN SERVICE

NOURA seasonal upgrade map, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online NOURA seasonal upgrade

French shipping line CMA CGM has revealed its seasonal “broadening of the service evolution” of its port coverage to East Africa, namely the NOURA service.

A direct weekly call to Maputo, Mozambique, will be added on NOURA during austral winter from Weeks 26 to 36, thus offering a competitive transit time from Jebel Ali to Maputo of 29 days.

This will commence with the vessel CMA CGM LA TOUR, ETD Jebel Ali on 1 June 2019, with the new NOURA seasonal rotation becoming:

Primary route:
Jebel Ali – Mombasa – Mogadishu – Longoni – Beira – Maputo (MPS) – Port Victoria – Jebel Ali

Secondary route:
Jebel Ali – Mombasa – Mogadishu – Longoni – Nacala – Maputo (MPS)- Port Victoria – Jebel Ali

During the period, a 7th ship will be added to the Noura service, enhancing the schedule reliability.

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ANGLO AMERICAN PERFORMS FIRST CARBON OFFSET IRON ORE SHIPMENT FROM SOUTH AFRICA TO EUROPE

Anglo American logo featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

The Anglo American mining company has offset the carbon emissions for an ocean freight voyage from South Africa to Europe, using RightShip’s verified carbon accounting tool and offset credits purchased from South Pole.

Carbon offsetting is a method introduced to reduce the carbon footprint of,in this case, an ocean voyage, by purchasing carbon offset credits that help fund the reduction of emissions elsewhere.

The credits purchased by Anglo American came from the Swiss carbon financing company South Pole.

Anglo American is a major transporter of of bulk commodity products and says it places protection of the environment and sustainability at the…

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CHEVRON WALKS AWAY FROM ANADARKO PURCHASE

Anadarko Petroleum, from a report carried by Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

US oil and energy giant Chevron is no longer interested in a bidding war with Occidental Petroleum for Anadarko Petroleum, the company has announced.

Chevron at one stage appeared to have secured a purchase agreement with Anadarko, until the appearance of Occidental Petroleum.

Chevron’s response to the increased offer made by…

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GHANA’S PRESIDENT INTERCEDES IN TEMA PORT DISPUTE

The Tema new port and terminals, due for completion in the coming months, featured in African PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online The Tema new port and terminals, due for completion in the coming months

Ghana’s president Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addohas become involved in the dispute between Ghana Ports and Harbour Authority (GPHA) and other stakeholders over the Tema Port Expansion project.

The president took part in a closed-door meeting with the relevant parties seeking a resolution between them, according to a report in the Ghanaian Times.

GPHA workers have raised concerns over an agreement with…

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MORE ACTS OF PIRACY REPORTED FROM GULF OF GUINEA

The flag of a pirate ship of old might not be seen today but acts of piracy are almost as common as ever, from a feature in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online The flag of a pirate ship of old might not be in use today but acts of piracy are almost as common as they ever were

Several more acts of piracy or attempted piracy have been reported from the Gulf of Guinea region.

On 5 May it is reported that armed pirates attacked a tug that was underway approximately 41 nautical miles south-west of Luba in Equatorial Guinea.

This was in position 03:04N – 007:59E at 12h00 UTC and not far from where just more than a week ago the semi-submersible heavylift ship…

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DEBMARINE NAMIBIA CONTRACTS DAMEN TO BUILD SEVENTH DIAMOND RECOVERY VESSEL

SS Nujoma, another fairly recent Debmarine Namibia diamond recovery newbuild, built by Klevens Verft and completed in Cape Town in June 2017 at a cost of US$157 million. Reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news SS Nujoma, another Debmarine Namibia diamond recovery newbuild, built by Klevens Verft and completed in Cape Town in June 2017 at a cost of US$157 million.

Debmarine Namibia announced yesterday (Thursday 16 May) the construction of the world’s first ever custom-built diamond recovery ship.

The new vessel is expected to cost US$468 million and represents the largest ever single investment in the marine diamond industry.

The ship will be the seventh vessel in the Debmarine Namibia fleet and is scheduled to commence operations in 2022. On completion the ship is expected to add 500,000 carats annually to Debmarine Namibia’s production, an increase of approximately 35% on current production.

Following an extensive global tendering process, Damen Shipyards were selected to build the ship which was based on Damen’s strong track record for delivering quality vessels and their advanced technological capabilities.

The new ship will incorporate the latest marine technologies that will drive improved safety performance while optimising efficiency and utilisation rates.

“We note and appreciate the investment announced today by Debmarine Namibia,” said Tom Alweendo, Namibia’s Minister of Mines and Energy. It is through investments like this we can continue to develop Namibia’s economy.”

He said the government will continue to do what it can to promote and encourage investment in the mining sector.

Bruce Cleaver, CEO of the De Beers Group said that some of the highest quality diamonds in the world are found at sea off the Namibian coast. “With this investment we will be able to optimise new technologies to find and recover diamonds more efficiently and meet growing consumer demand across the globe.”

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PRESIDENT NYUSI CONCERNED THAT ARMED VIOLENCE IN NORTH OF MOZAMBIQUE COULD SPREAD

Map showing location of village of Anga near Mocimboada Praia in northern Mozambique, the scene of the latest atrocity, reported in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news

Mozambique’s President Filipe Nyusi says he is concerned that armed violence in the north of Mozambique could spread.

He was speaking in an interview with the Canal de Moçambique newspaper and said that the government was anxious to discover the reason for the armed attacks on civilians in the very north of the country, because he said there are fears that they could spread.

Meanwhile on Monday this week yet another attack took place in Cabo Delgado province in the village of Anga, which is just seven kilometres from the official residence of the District Administrator of Mocímboa da Praia, reports the independent newssheet A Carta de Moçambique.

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APM TERMINALS INLAND SERVICES TO BE INTEGRATED INTO MAERSK LOGISTICS

Maersk Logistics & Services image, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

APM Terminals Inland Services is to be integrated into Maersk Logistics & Services as from 1 August 2019.

Announcing this yesterday (Thursday 16 May) Maersk said the integration was aimed at providing customers with seamless access to a wider range of logistics & services offerings and was the next step in the implementation of A.P. Moller – Maersk’s strategy of offering customers’ end-to-end solutions.

The Inland Services portfolio consists of a network of inland terminals around the globe made up of 36 business units with over 100 locations. By bringing together all operations skills and capabilities within logistics, Maersk says it…

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SOUTH AFRICAN PORT STATISTICS FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL ARE NOW AVAILABLE

Port of Richards Bay multi purpose and dry bulk terminals, as featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online Port of Richards Bay multi purpose and dry bulk terminals

Port statistics for the month of April 2019, covering the eight commercial ports under the administration of Transnet National Ports Authority, are now available.

Leading port by way of cargo throughput measured in tonnes was Richards Bay, which was followed by Durban and then Saldanha Bay.

Details of the port throughputs, ships berthed and containers numbers handled can be seen in the Tables below.

Total cargo handled for the month of March amounted to…

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REPORT PUBLISHED ON INDUSTRY-LEVEL RESPONSE TO MARINE PLASTIC POLLUTION

Pollution from the sea. Image: YouTubefeatured in report carried in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online Pollution from the sea.    Image: YouTube

A report that follows a roundtable discussion hosted by the Institute of Marine Engineering, Science & Technology (IMarEST) together with the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), has been published.

Seen as an industry-level response to marine plastic pollution, the discussion looked to gauge a wider industry perspective into the challenges, management practices and attitudes of professionals across the marine industry.

The subsequent report is now available to download and gives an overview of the discussion and recommendations directly from industry on how the IMarEST can support education efforts targeted across marine sectors.

IMarEST logo, featured in Africa PORTS & SHIPS maritime news online

Marine activities, although proportionately lower contributors than other industries, are acknowledged contributors to marine plastic litter and an estimated 5.2 trillion pieces of plastics are circulating in the oceans.

By making their way into marine life, plastics are responsible for the deaths of over 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine mammals yearly, amongst a tidal wave of other environmental issues. The report seeks to investigate how the marine industry can reduce its environmental footprint when it comes to ocean plastics.

Given the plethora of environmental risks and consequences for marine services, the report suggests that a robust review of common practices and of the infrastructure to support proper disposal and management of plastics is required – one that considers the needs of different marine sectors and the drivers for plastic generation in order to identify new solutions.

Readers can download the report CLICK HERE to open, then click on VIEW to open pdf file (confirm agreement for tracking).

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GENERAL NEWS REPORTS – UPDATED THROUGH THE DAY

in partnership with – APO

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EXPECTED SHIP ARRIVALS and SHIPS IN PORT


Port Louis – Indian Ocean gateway port

Ports & Ships publishes regularly updated SHIP MOVEMENT reports including ETAs for ports extending from West Africa to South Africa to East Africa and including Port Louis in Mauritius.

In the case of South Africa’s container ports of Durban, Ngqura, Ports Elizabeth and Cape Town links to container Stack Dates are also available.

You can access this information, including the list of ports covered, by going HERE remember to use your BACKSPACE to return to this page.

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CRUISE NEWS AND NAVAL ACTIVITIES


QM2 in Cape Town. Picture by Ian Shiffman

We publish news about the cruise industry here in the general news section.

Naval News

Similarly you can read our regular Naval News reports and stories here in the general news section.

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THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.”

– Eleanor Roosevelt

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Don’t forget to send us your news and press releases for inclusion in the News Bulletins. Shipping related pictures submitted by readers are always welcome. Email to info@africaports.co.za

 

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